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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1993
We all have opinions. They are usually based on some belief. What is interesting is that most people do not realize this, and present their opinion as fact based on a belief they consider a fact. Raymond P. Gauer (letter on ACLU director Ramona Ripston, May 20) lists a number of Ripston's "projects," which he obviously thinks are bad. Let's look at the other side of the coin. Pornography--legal in Denmark and they have far less problems with sex crimes than we do. Legalization of drugs--more and more people involved with the failing drug war are calling for legalization.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By Stefan Halper and Lezlee Brown Halper
Beijing has no shortage of issues to confront. There's the South China Sea, uncontrollable corruption, a slowing economy and factional disputes within the party and military. But Chinese officials also face one of the most difficult challenges in modern statecraft: how to conquer a myth. Despite China's attempts to dislodge its mythic appeal, Tibet as Shangri-La seems firmly set in the world's imagination. The once-independent nation, set high on a broad plateau adjacent to the Himalayas, is a worldwide symbol of mystery, aspiration, spirituality and possibility.
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OPINION
July 28, 2013
If you've ever tried to submit a poem to Opinion, you've probably gotten a reply noting that we simply don't print poetry. We didn't print the poem that came in the shape of the World Trade Center towers after 9/11; we didn't print the poem that came in this month after the Trayvon Martin verdict; and we didn't print any of the hundreds of poems that came in between those events. But we've decided to make a one-time exception. We are inviting Op-Poetry submissions from readers, and on Sunday, Aug. 25, we'll devote a page of our print section to the best of what comes in. And we'll feature more of it on the Opinion website.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014
Re "Shooter said to be furious," April 5 The article states that investigators may never have a motive for Ft. Hood shooter Army Spc. Ivan Lopez. Really? A soldier who was being treated for depression and anxiety was granted less than two days to go home to Puerto Rico for his mother's funeral five months ago; more recently, he was denied another temporary leave to return home to deal with family matters related to his mother's death. This man was sent into harm's way to protect our country, and we can't give him compassionate leaves of duty during such a tragic time in his life?
OPINION
August 26, 2012 | By Cary Schneider and Sue Horton
" There are two sides to every issue: One side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil. " - Ayn Rand's hero John Galt speaking in "Atlas Shrugged" Ayn Rand's novel "Atlas Shrugged" has polarized opinion for more than 50 years. Its fans - including, until recently, vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan - applaud the book's celebration of rugged individualism and no-holds-barred capitalism. Its critics dismiss it as heartless, simplistic and elitist. In the novel, many of the nation's most brilliant and innovative entrepreneurs and business leaders have disappeared, leaving the nation in chaos.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alzheimer's disease and other dementias not only destroy the lives of those who suffer from them but take a devastating toll on family caregivers and on those who must pay the cost of care. An estimated 5 million people in the United States suffer from Alzheimer's. But that number will increase exponentially in the years ahead because of what Robin Barr, a senior official at the National Institute on Aging, calls "an aging tsunami. " A highly cited published research analysis estimates that the number of people with Alzheimer's around the world will jump from 36 million today to 115 million by 2050.
OPINION
September 21, 2013
Re "'This is the line in the sand,' House Republicans say," Sept. 19 Paraphrasing Mark Twain, there are lies, damned lies and statistics. The Republicans are distorting the facts on public support for Obamacare. The September Pew Research poll shows that 53% disapprove of Obamacare, while 42% approve. What Republicans are not saying is that, according to a May CNN poll, more than a quarter of those disapproving are opposed because the law does not go far enough. The Pew poll also reports that about half of the 53% who disapprove of the law (27% overall)
OPINION
July 20, 2013
Since George Zimmerman was acquitted last Saturday on all charges in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, The Times has received more than 250 letters reacting to the verdict and its aftermath. Almost all of the letters have been pointed and earnest, and readers on all sides of the debate have found little to like about the case and its aftermath. Most of the letters can be placed into four broad categories: Those who say the jury got it right (although a sizable number of those say the outcome wasn't necessarily just)
OPINION
April 20, 2012
Got a beef with the L.A. Times? Read something in the paper that really ticked you off, but haven't got a place to make your opinion heard? Want to write an article about it and get it into The Times? Blowback is The Times' forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds. It is the missing link between the 150-word letter to the editor and the Op-Ed piece, and you're invited to participate. To submit an entry to Blowback, just send your best 700 words or fewer to blowback@latimes.com . To get an idea of what we're looking for, check out previous postings . By submitting a Blowback article, you agree to our terms of service . Any questions?
OPINION
January 15, 2013 | By David Kopel
Everyone knows the terrible litany of gun violence: Columbine High School, Virginia Tech, Ft. Hood, Tucson, the Cinemark movie theater in Colorado, the Sikh temple in Wisconsin, Sandy Hook Elementary School. Here are some examples you may not have heard about: Pearl High School in Mississippi; Sullivan Central High School in Tennessee; Appalachian School of Law in Virginia; a middle school dance in Edinboro, Pa.; Players Bar and Grill in Nevada; a Shoney's restaurant in Alabama; Trolley Square Mall in Salt Lake City; New Life Church in Colorado; Clackamas Mall in Oregon (three days before Sandy Hook)
OPINION
April 8, 2014
Re "A new approach to skid row," Editorial, April 4 I am delighted by your editorial. As part of the L.A. Catholic Worker community on skid row for more than 40 years, we have not only fed and cared for the homeless, we have also over the years given out roughly 10,000 free shopping carts. We have been an integral part of the federal lawsuit against the city for the seizure of shopping carts and the vital possessions of the homeless that the city has fruitlessly pursued all the way to the Supreme Court.
OPINION
April 8, 2014
Re "Celebrated child actor of the 1930s and '40s," Obituary, April 7 He could make you laugh and smile, or make you cry. He was adept at singing, dancing, playing the drums, and acting with his dear friends Judy Garland and Elizabeth Taylor and so many greats. It's easy to get sentimental about Mickey Rooney while remembering his legendary talents that lasted his whole life. He could do it all and do it well with complete ease and generosity to his audience. It is safe to say he was one of a kind, and his accomplishments thankfully are preserved on film as a gift to all who loved him. Thank you, Mickey, for putting on all those wonderful and joyous shows.
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Sex ed stumbles in Mississippi," April 3 Communities in Mississippi are using the Bible to reject any sex education other than abstinence. Interestingly, Mississippi's divorce rates are among the highest in the country, and by region the South has the highest rate. Jesus didn't hand out many laws. He taught by parable and the example of his actions. However, Jesus spoke clearly about divorce: In the Gospel of Mark, he said: "Anyone who divorces his wife and marries another woman commits adultery against her. And if she divorces her husband and marries another man, she commits adultery.
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Hands off those photos," Editorial, April 3 Count me among those who have encountered security hysteria for taking pictures. In 2004, I stood in a broad, traffic-free street in a river-adjacent industrial zone of my hometown of Memphis, seeking to capture the beautiful, auburn-streaked patina of a huge, unpainted storage tank. An overzealous security guard called 911 to report a frighteningly skinny, 60-year-old white man in shorts, who might be a terrorist hell-bent on blowing up thousands of gallons of maybe cottonseed oil or rendered animal fat. Memphis police screamed onto the scene.
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Even more money in politics?," Editorial, April 3 As an attorney, any remaining illusion I had that our highest judicial body decides cases on a nonpartisan basis is gone after reading the Supreme Court's decision in McCutcheon vs. Federal Election Commission. First, the tortured Citizens United finding in 2010 - that corporations have 1st Amendment rights similar to those of individuals - opened the floodgates for those who want to buy the government. After that, the Shelby County case gutted the Voting Rights Act, resulting in gleeful red states passing laws that prevent poor people and minorities from voting.
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "Tarnished political brands," Opinion, April 2 I am tired of hearing about the Bushes and the Clintons as comparable political dynasties. We've had one Clinton elected to the White House, and his wife served as a senator and then secretary of State in the Obama administration. There is no comparison to the actual Bush dynasty. George H.W. Bush was head of the CIA, vice president and eventually president. His eldest son was governor of Texas and then president; another son was governor of Florida.
SPORTS
March 25, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
Interesting timing, the Lakers playing the Oklahoma City Thunder on Friday after Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi recently posited that Kevin Durant had passed Kobe Bryant as the NBA's second-best player behind LeBron James .… Apparently no fan of the Lakers star, Taibbi also called Bryant a "demented three-faced narcissist." … Three-faced narcissists must have trouble with mirrors.… Just when everybody seemed ready to bury him, Ron Artest was at his struttin', stealin', swaggerin' best Wednesday.
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "The quest for diversity," Editorial, March 28 Your editorial on Proposition 209 and diversity at California's public universities is unclear and patronizing. It is unclear in endorsing as the benchmark of "meaningful racial diversity" the University of California's "diversity goals" - goals that the university has not itself enunciated. One can try and divine what the university's goals are, but with little success. Apparently, exceeding the pre-Proposition 209 minority enrollment (except for African American students at Berkeley and UCLA)
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "Jonathan Pollard's fate," Editorial, April 2 You argue that releasing Jonathan Pollard, the former intelligence worker who passed along secret information to Israel and was sentenced to life in prison, is a poor decision because it would set an "unseemly precedent. " You go on to argue that releasing Pollard would not have any real impact on Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Both claims fail to see the urgency of the situation. Releasing Pollard would actually provide concrete incentives to Israel's very right-wing government by rewarding it for concessions.
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