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Opposite Effect

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991
In my opinion the anti-war demonstrators, peace marchers and American flag burners had just the opposite effect. They helped convince Hussein that President Bush was bluffing. Too bad they didn't go to Baghdad for their demonstrations. STEPHEN SWIATEK Yucca Valley
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TRAVEL
October 22, 2006
AFTER reading Beverly Beyette's article on Macao ["A New Type of Treasure Island Rises," Oct. 8], I became sad thinking of the lost charm of the old Macao, which I had visited in 1987 and 1999 and loved. I happened to be in Beijing when Wynn Macau opened, and it distressed me as I watched the weeklong promotion to visit Macao. Las Vegas has its place. To try to outdo Vegas and emulate Western culture can have the opposite effect, except on the casino owner's pocketbook. Living conditions are probably better for the people of Macao, but at the loss of what?
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NEWS
January 23, 1987
Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger cautioned that any major withdrawal of U.S. troops from Western Europe could cause a backlash among the allies and weaken the defense of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. "Rather than prompting a surge in allied burden-sharing, major U.S. troop withdrawals from Europe likely would have the opposite effect," he told the Denver Rotary Club. Some members of Congress have suggested that a withdrawal of some of the 350,000 U.S.
SPORTS
April 28, 2003 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
Not content merely to put their team in an early hole, the Angels' starting pitchers found a new and creative way to mess things up Sunday. After the Angels had rallied with three runs to bail out starter John Lackey, Mickey Callaway yielded home runs to David Ortiz and Jason Varitek on consecutive pitches in the 14th inning as the Boston Red Sox pulled out a 6-4 victory at Edison Field.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2006
AFTER reading Beverly Beyette's article on Macao ["A New Type of Treasure Island Rises," Oct. 8], I became sad thinking of the lost charm of the old Macao, which I had visited in 1987 and 1999 and loved. I happened to be in Beijing when Wynn Macau opened, and it distressed me as I watched the weeklong promotion to visit Macao. Las Vegas has its place. To try to outdo Vegas and emulate Western culture can have the opposite effect, except on the casino owner's pocketbook. Living conditions are probably better for the people of Macao, but at the loss of what?
OPINION
February 27, 2002
The Transportation Security Administration has ordered the elimination of VIP lines at U.S. airports (Feb. 21). The bureaucrats have it all wrong once again. I travel for pleasure two to three times per year. I have a relative who travels on business at least 10 times more often. It makes perfect sense to allow the frequent-flying business traveler to get special treatment. I may be flying on a $300 ticket while the business flyer could easily be paying $1,200 for the same flight. It really doesn't make any difference to me if it takes a couple of hours to check in on a vacation flight; however, those same two hours can be critical to the business flyer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993
Kevin Phillips quotes Clinton ("Is Clinton Forgetting the Middle Class?" Opinion, Jan. 24) as saying " 'The truth is that middle-class Americans are basically the only group of Americans who've been taxed more in the 1980s and during the last 12 years, even though their incomes have gone down. The wealthiest Americans have been taxed much less, even though their incomes have gone up,' " adding his own comment, "His words were true." No, his words were not true. According to Census Bureau data, if households are divided into five equal groups according to income, all five groups had significant income gains from 1980 to 1989.
MAGAZINE
July 22, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON and RONALD L. SOBLE, John Johnson and Ronald L. Soble, Times staff writers, are working on a book about the Menendez case for New American Library.
ON A MILD SUNDAY last summer, a string of "popping sounds" drifted through the lazy night air of Beverly Hills around 10 o'clock. "I didn't think anything of it," said Tom Zlotow, a neighbor who soon learned that the noises he'd heard from the house right behind his were echoes of the most sensational crime in the history of Beverly Hills. "I didn't even think it could be gunfire, especially around here."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1997
Movies got much more violent and sexy after the rating system was instituted, and the same thing is going to happen to television: After V-chips are installed in television sets across America, TV producers will no longer feel a need to limit the amount of sex and violence in their programs. Thus, the current crusade to limit the content of TV programs through a program rating system will have effects directly opposite to what its proponents are hoping for. RICHARD SHOWSTACK Newport Beach
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sometimes exercise can weaken an athlete's ability to fight off a cold. Other times, researchers say, exercise won't make a difference--or might strengthen that ability. The difference seems to depend on how much exercise the athlete does. "Recent evidence suggests that athletes experience mild suppression of immune function during periods of intense training," said researcher Laurel T. Mackinnon of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.
OPINION
February 27, 2002
The Transportation Security Administration has ordered the elimination of VIP lines at U.S. airports (Feb. 21). The bureaucrats have it all wrong once again. I travel for pleasure two to three times per year. I have a relative who travels on business at least 10 times more often. It makes perfect sense to allow the frequent-flying business traveler to get special treatment. I may be flying on a $300 ticket while the business flyer could easily be paying $1,200 for the same flight. It really doesn't make any difference to me if it takes a couple of hours to check in on a vacation flight; however, those same two hours can be critical to the business flyer.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sometimes exercise can weaken an athlete's ability to fight off a cold. Other times, researchers say, exercise won't make a difference--or might strengthen that ability. The difference seems to depend on how much exercise the athlete does. "Recent evidence suggests that athletes experience mild suppression of immune function during periods of intense training," said researcher Laurel T. Mackinnon of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let captains of industry fume and economists puzzle. Jean-Claude Castex, who keeps the fires burning at one of the most revered shrines in Christendom, thinks France's groundbreaking law setting a shorter workweek is divine. "We used to work 39 hours a week. Now we will work 34," the feutier, or tender of religious candles, at Lourdes, says. "I love walking in the mountains and hunting for mushrooms. I have a wife and two children. Now I'll be able to spend more time with them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1998 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to remove Matilija Dam to save the endangered southern steelhead trout has gained favor with environmentalists, but a growing number of critics say it would be costly, complicated and potentially dangerous for the few remaining steelhead left in Southern California. A variety of scientists, government officials and two recent studies contend that there are cheaper and simpler ways of restoring the steelhead's habitat than spending millions to dismantle a 145-foot-tall dam.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | JAMES K. GLASSMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Just as the stock market crash of 1929 changed the face of politics for the next six decades, the stock market boom of the 1990s may change the face of politics well into the next millennium. The crash of '29 was the catalyst for the modern welfare state. The current market boom could produce its opposite. As more Americans gain a stake in stocks, their views undoubtedly will change on such matters as business regulation, taxes, antitrust policy, trade, even foreign affairs.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his living room on Railway Street, retired butcher Cecil Allen stares, without seeing, at a TV game show. "Two boys gone like that," he says. "If some good could come of it. . . . But . . ." On Chapel Street, with a side table laden with cards of condolence from across the island and beyond, the house of garage owner Sean Trainor bursts with heartbreak. "It's good you reopened the garage today, or else the bastards have won," a comforting neighbor murmurs. Sean Trainor is not focusing.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | JAMES K. GLASSMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Just as the stock market crash of 1929 changed the face of politics for the next six decades, the stock market boom of the 1990s may change the face of politics well into the next millennium. The crash of '29 was the catalyst for the modern welfare state. The current market boom could produce its opposite. As more Americans gain a stake in stocks, their views undoubtedly will change on such matters as business regulation, taxes, antitrust policy, trade, even foreign affairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1997
Movies got much more violent and sexy after the rating system was instituted, and the same thing is going to happen to television: After V-chips are installed in television sets across America, TV producers will no longer feel a need to limit the amount of sex and violence in their programs. Thus, the current crusade to limit the content of TV programs through a program rating system will have effects directly opposite to what its proponents are hoping for. RICHARD SHOWSTACK Newport Beach
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