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Opposition Leaders

NEWS
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gunman slightly wounded Serbia's most powerful opposition leader, Vuk Draskovic, late Thursday with a burst of automatic weapons fire at a coastal vacation home in the Yugoslav republic of Montenegro, police and aides to the politician said today. Members of Draskovic's Serbian Renewal Movement called the 11:30 p.m. shooting an assassination attempt, the second in less than a year on the longtime foe of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Draskovic, 53, was hit by two bullets.
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WORLD
December 20, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Tensions over disputed presidential balloting were at a peak when Yulia Tymoshenko, the fiery second-in-command of Ukraine's opposition movement, stepped to the microphone of an outdoor stage during a rally early this month. The crowd of about 150,000 had gathered to back opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko's bid for the presidency.
WORLD
November 10, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Rejecting calls for his resignation over allegations that his ruling party rigged results of last week's parliamentary elections, Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Sunday launched talks with his opponents to defuse a growing crisis in his former Soviet republic. "I was elected by the Georgian people," Shevardnadze told reporters on the second day of demonstrations that drew thousands of protesters in Tbilisi, the nation's capital.
NEWS
September 22, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cold drizzle and deep public cynicism Tuesday dampened the start of what opposition leaders are trying to make the final push to drive Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from power. Splintered by infighting, the opposition managed to rally an estimated 20,000 demonstrators in central Belgrade, a sharp drop from the more than 100,000 people who turned out here Aug. 19 for a protest.
NEWS
October 29, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haji Mir Hamed Jaafari appears old and frightened, hardly the image of an Afghan warrior. Once in charge of an armed force of 1,500 fighters and 31 tanks, Jaafari, 44, now spends his days under guard of a handful of knife-wielding relatives in a seven-room house in this provincial capital near Iran's eastern border. He has applied to the United Nations for asylum, an unusual request for an Afghan opposition leader, according to the organization.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Havel, Czechoslovakia's opposition leader and likely future president, appealed in an extraordinary nationally televised address on Saturday for national unity and an end to political maneuvering over the presidential vacancy. The nation, he said, cannot "afford the luxury of waiting and postponement." The debate over the presidency, he added, should be completed "quickly, preferably by the end of the year."
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen years before he became an overnight presidential hopeful, Fernando Olivera was elected Peru's youngest congressman. His party's emblem was a broom. The broom still symbolizes the 42-year-old former prosecutor's mission to clean up politics: since 1985 he has gone after larcenous politicians, murderous military officers and the like.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An idyllic retreat that once nestled the Communist elite among flowering fruit trees and sprawling lawns now stands empty of guests but full of possibilities for a new life as a luxury spa. The Bankya estate of former dictator Todor Zhivkov boasts a covered pool and sauna that could be readied for visitors in hours. Suites opening out to bird song and pine forests need only to have their king-size beds made. Marble terraces overlooking bucolic vistas beg to host outdoor cafes.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Kim Young Sam agreed to meet opposition leaders to try to resolve the labor unrest that has idled the country's key industries for more than three weeks. The president's office announced the concession today as tens of thousands of union members returned to work. Hundreds of militant students battled police on Sunday with firebombs, rocks and tear gas, hours after a union leader urged an end to protest violence.
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