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Optical Scanners

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Republican Assembly candidate Susan Shelley said Monday that she was calling off a recount from the Nov. 19 election after one day of re-tallying ballots found little difference. The decision means Democrat Matt Dababneh is the winner of the election in the 45th Assembly District, which extends from the San Fernando Valley to a sliver of Ventura County. "The recount today confirmed that the optical scanners tallied the votes correctly," Shelley, a Woodland Hills author and publisher, said in a statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Republican Assembly candidate Susan Shelley said Monday that she was calling off a recount from the Nov. 19 election after one day of re-tallying ballots found little difference. The decision means Democrat Matt Dababneh is the winner of the election in the 45th Assembly District, which extends from the San Fernando Valley to a sliver of Ventura County. "The recount today confirmed that the optical scanners tallied the votes correctly," Shelley, a Woodland Hills author and publisher, said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
November 4, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Employees roamed the halls of the Commerce Department, carrying boxes crammed with export license applications from American firms. Too often, the papers disappeared in the bowels of the bureaucracy, and the secretary of commerce himself would make four or five phone calls a day in search of missing licenses. Those were the dark days of 1984 and 1985, when it took as long as 60 days to get government permission to sell sensitive electronics and technology abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2006 | Valerie Reitman and Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writers
When Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa cast his ballot early Tuesday, an electronic scanner spit it right back: "Ballot alert," declared the machine's printed message. The mayor apparently had "overvoted" by punching too many bubbles on his ballot. He went back into the booth and filled out his choices again. For Villaraigosa, Los Angeles County's new $25-million InkaVote Plus machines, which use an optical scanner to check ballots for errors, worked like a charm.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | RICHARD O'REILLY, RICHARD O'REILLY is director of computer analysis for The Times
Major strides are being made in affordably priced systems that can scan a page of text or numbers and convert it into a computer file. Optical character recognition software, or OCR, is used in combination with scanners, available from a number of manufacturers. The scanner makes a graphic image file of the page being scanned. The OCR software reads the image file searching for patterns it recognizes as letters, numbers, punctuation marks and other symbols.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
If you have trouble setting your VCR to tape a program while you're out of the house, you're not alone. Research has shown that most people don't even use the "time-shifting" capability of their videocassette recorders. They're content simply to rent tapes or, if recording from TV, to do it while the show is on. "Time-shifting is the No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2006 | Valerie Reitman and Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writers
When Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa cast his ballot early Tuesday, an electronic scanner spit it right back: "Ballot alert," declared the machine's printed message. The mayor apparently had "overvoted" by punching too many bubbles on his ballot. He went back into the booth and filled out his choices again. For Villaraigosa, Los Angeles County's new $25-million InkaVote Plus machines, which use an optical scanner to check ballots for errors, worked like a charm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
Orange County took the final steps Tuesday to prepare for the Oct. 7 election, agreeing to buy four optical scan machines that will be used to count hundreds of thousands of ballots expected to be cast in the state's first gubernatorial recall election. County voters will use pen and paper to cast votes, filling in small boxes next to the name of their candidate of choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999
Once again, Los Angeles leads the nation in a category that brings us no pride. Already the bank robbery capital of the country, we are now No. 1 in travel agency robberies as well. This unwelcome distinction came to light earlier this month when an armed robbery of a Granada Hills travel agency ended in the fatal shooting of two suspected ticket thieves by a Los Angeles police unit. Police had been investigating a series of 25 travel agency robberies in the San Fernando Valley since January.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From the Orlando Sentinel
When Democratic candidate Al Gore challenged the results of the 2000 presidential election in Florida, attention focused on the state's problem-plagued punch-card ballots with their hanging and pregnant chads. But another voting system was even less reliable than the punch cards, the Orlando Sentinel found: an optical scanning system used in 15 of Florida's 67 counties. That system, in which ovals on paper ballots are filled in by pencil and scanned at a central county office, resulted in 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
Orange County took the final steps Tuesday to prepare for the Oct. 7 election, agreeing to buy four optical scan machines that will be used to count hundreds of thousands of ballots expected to be cast in the state's first gubernatorial recall election. County voters will use pen and paper to cast votes, filling in small boxes next to the name of their candidate of choice.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From the Orlando Sentinel
When Democratic candidate Al Gore challenged the results of the 2000 presidential election in Florida, attention focused on the state's problem-plagued punch-card ballots with their hanging and pregnant chads. But another voting system was even less reliable than the punch cards, the Orlando Sentinel found: an optical scanning system used in 15 of Florida's 67 counties. That system, in which ovals on paper ballots are filled in by pencil and scanned at a central county office, resulted in 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999
Once again, Los Angeles leads the nation in a category that brings us no pride. Already the bank robbery capital of the country, we are now No. 1 in travel agency robberies as well. This unwelcome distinction came to light earlier this month when an armed robbery of a Granada Hills travel agency ended in the fatal shooting of two suspected ticket thieves by a Los Angeles police unit. Police had been investigating a series of 25 travel agency robberies in the San Fernando Valley since January.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | RICHARD O'REILLY, RICHARD O'REILLY is director of computer analysis for The Times
Major strides are being made in affordably priced systems that can scan a page of text or numbers and convert it into a computer file. Optical character recognition software, or OCR, is used in combination with scanners, available from a number of manufacturers. The scanner makes a graphic image file of the page being scanned. The OCR software reads the image file searching for patterns it recognizes as letters, numbers, punctuation marks and other symbols.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
If you have trouble setting your VCR to tape a program while you're out of the house, you're not alone. Research has shown that most people don't even use the "time-shifting" capability of their videocassette recorders. They're content simply to rent tapes or, if recording from TV, to do it while the show is on. "Time-shifting is the No.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Employees roamed the halls of the Commerce Department, carrying boxes crammed with export license applications from American firms. Too often, the papers disappeared in the bowels of the bureaucracy, and the secretary of commerce himself would make four or five phone calls a day in search of missing licenses. Those were the dark days of 1984 and 1985, when it took as long as 60 days to get government permission to sell sensitive electronics and technology abroad.
OPINION
August 9, 2004
Re "Flawed Florida Touch Screens Draw Scrutiny," Aug. 6: That four years after the election debacle in Florida, officials have succeeded only in replacing hanging chads with unreliable touch screens is beyond scandalous. If the Supreme Court has any hope of restoring its credibility, it should demand that by Nov. 2 every state prepare paper ballots that can be read by optical scanners and verified thereafter. To do otherwise is to demean everything we stand for. Alitta Kullman Laguna Hills
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992
Veritec Inc. in Chatsworth said it has acquired an anti-counterfeiting identification system from Optical Scanners Ltd. The purchase price included $25,000 cash, 50,000 shares of Veritec Series B convertible preferred shares priced at $1 a share and warrants to purchase 150,000 shares of Veritec common stock at $1 a share. Optical Scanners will also receive a royalty of 5%, up to $150,000.
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