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Orange Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | Lesley Wright, (714) 966-7824
City officials will launch their budget process today by discussing goals for the future. The proposed missions, goals and services workshop will be followed in coming weeks by a review of the seven-year capital improvement plan, a study of next year's budget draft and adoption of the 1999-2000 budget in May, according to the city manager's office. Council members expect to take on a new Library Foundation, discuss annexation of East Orange territory and develop an Orange 2020 plan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | Allison Cohen, (714) 966-5835
The City Council this week unanimously approved a $126.8-million budget for fiscal 1999-2000. Officials say it includes new and expanded services eliminated during the recession of the early to mid-1990s, including new police, fire and main library staffing positions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city will begin the new fiscal year July 1 with a smaller budget and some important changes at City Hall. City Council members this week unanimously approved a general fund budget of $50.5 million, down nearly 3% from last year's. Residents do not face increases in fees or taxes. And starting in September, the civic center will be open every other Friday. For five years it has been closed Fridays because of reduced employee hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Torn between wanting better policing and opposing tax hikes, city officials have decided against supporting a $1 fee on motorists to help pay for a new countywide fingerprinting system. Instead, they said, they would rather pick through their budget to find the $455,000 expected for the city's share of the $10-million fingerprint identification system. More than $250,000 in law enforcement grants have already been set aside for the system, according to the city manager's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City spending will rise just a fraction in fiscal 1996-97, according to a preliminary budget presented by the city manager this week. The city could keep the proposed budget of $49.3 million close to last year's budget of $49.1 million by leaving some vacant jobs unfilled and using more contract workers, City Manager David L. Rudat said. Residents will not see any increase in taxes, fees or rates, Rudat said, and should not notice any drop in services if a City Hall reorganization goes well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City finance officials have drafted a $48.4-million budget for the coming fiscal year, which reduces departmental budgets by $1.45 million and spends $2.7 million of surplus from the 1994-95 budget. The budget that will be presented to council members this afternoon includes no tax hikes, but does use onetime, cost-cutting steps, finance officials warned in a cover report. The city, for example, will suspend payments to an equipment replacement fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City Manager David F. Dixon has told all department heads to "tighten their belts" to make up for a $750,000 loss during the current fiscal year because of the Orange County bankruptcy. Dixon also told City Council members last week that city government must be restructured before he can balance the 1995-96 budget. The midyear budget review was to have been the first report of good news in years, Dixon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1994 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The City Council has adopted a $47.2-million budget for the 1994-95 fiscal year that includes no increases in fees or taxes and is balanced for the first time in two years. The city trimmed $900,000 from the previous year's budget by asking each city department to reduce operating expenses 2% for the fiscal year that begins July 1, said Scott Morgan, assistant to the city manager. In previous years, the city drew on its reserves to make up deficits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council passed a $54.4-million budget this week that borrows from other funds to cover a $4.4-million shortfall, authorizes cuts in library hours and other services and extends the city's hiring freeze. Council members said they regretted the cutbacks and continued hardship for city departments, which have been operating with reduced staffs for more than a year, but warned that the worst may be yet to come. "It is not business as usual," Councilman Mike Spurgeon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1993 | HELAINE OLEN
In response to budget cuts that have left the Police Department with 10 unfilled positions, the department will no longer send officers to take reports on minor traffic accidents or petty theft cases, officials said. Instead, people wishing to report such incidents will have to go to the Police Department themselves to fill out the paperwork. "We need to have police out in the field to answer calls instead of sit in the office," said Lt. Trey Sirks, a spokesman for the Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city will begin the new fiscal year July 1 with a smaller budget and some important changes at City Hall. City Council members this week unanimously approved a general fund budget of $50.5 million, down nearly 3% from last year's. Residents do not face increases in fees or taxes. And starting in September, the civic center will be open every other Friday. For five years it has been closed Fridays because of reduced employee hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city budget proposed for next fiscal year is slightly less than this year's and includes two big changes aimed at improving services. One large item in the 1997-98 fiscal year budget, which begins in July, is $1 million for a renovation of the Orange Central Library. This project may cause some consternation because the library will be shut for six months, library services director Gary Wann said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city will enter its new fiscal year with a $49-million budget that includes no raises in taxes or fees. City Manager David L. Rudat said he balanced the budget, which is less than 1% higher than last year's, by cutting 30 vacant positions from the city payroll. No employees will be laid off, he said. City Council members unanimously approved the budget after a public hearing this week where no one voiced an opinion about the document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City spending will rise just a fraction in fiscal 1996-97, according to a preliminary budget presented by the city manager this week. The city could keep the proposed budget of $49.3 million close to last year's budget of $49.1 million by leaving some vacant jobs unfilled and using more contract workers, City Manager David L. Rudat said. Residents will not see any increase in taxes, fees or rates, Rudat said, and should not notice any drop in services if a City Hall reorganization goes well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City finance officials have drafted a $48.4-million budget for the coming fiscal year, which reduces departmental budgets by $1.45 million and spends $2.7 million of surplus from the 1994-95 budget. The budget that will be presented to council members this afternoon includes no tax hikes, but does use onetime, cost-cutting steps, finance officials warned in a cover report. The city, for example, will suspend payments to an equipment replacement fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1993 | HELAINE OLEN
A furlough plan and salary reduction imposed on city non-safety employees last September in lieu of layoffs has created its own slew of problems, even as it saved the cash-strapped city $1.3 million. Problems cited by city department heads in a report released last week by City Manager Ron Thompson included low employee morale, increased citizen complaints about service, and higher employee workloads in return for lower salaries.
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