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Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter

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NEWS
March 4, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school and college students--so often portrayed as children of the Me Decade--have become eager participants in a new program to tutor homeless children, the program's creators say. Guy Foresman, a student minister at the United Church of Christ in Corona del Mar, said he was overwhelmed by the students' response to his plan for using volunteers to teach children of the Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1999 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Rosa went to three schools in Costa Mesa last week to enroll her two young sons, but all three turned them away. Exasperated and feeling defeated, she returned to her family's home, a motel on Harbor Boulevard. It was there one afternoon last week that she met Lori Glover and Vanessa Ontiveros, administrators at the nearby Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter. They were looking for people just like the Rosas--families with no permanent home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1994 | TOM RAGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three of the city's most respected charities for the homeless are under attack by some residents, who contend the organizations and others are "magnets" for street people and want the city to revoke their permits to operate. Citing thefts, car burglaries and acts of random violence by the homeless, the residents said they would like to see other cities share the burden of caring for Costa Mesa's estimated 1,500 street people.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: Shelter Stampede, a boot stompin' hoedown staged by the Friends of Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter. Saturday's dinner-dance took place at Bommer Canyon in Irvine and raised funds for the Costa Mesa-based homeless shelter. Taste of the West: More than 150 suburban cowboys in blue jeans and boots gathered at the old cattle camp for what gala chairwoman Susan Leibel called "a western adult fantasy night."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994
Your article "Residents Want Costa Mesa to Oust 3 Charities" (Nov. 22) reports ". . . that some residents want the charities out because they are magnets for street people." Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter was named as one of the three charities. For 13 years, Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter has helped the homeless become housed. We have an 84% success rate in moving graduates into permanent homes. One-third of our clients are young children. They do not fit a stereotype of street people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995
What: Teachers. Where: Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter. Mission: To teach clerical and computer skills to clients of the shelter so that they can find jobs. Information: (714) 631-7213. --COMPILED BY MIMI KO CRUZ
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1987
With any issue, it's always dangerous to make sweeping statements. Although I was pleased to see Thomas Tierney's excellent commentary "Shelter for All" (Oct. 18), there is a point that I think needs to be clarified. In his article, Tierney stated "some assistance is given from the labyrinth of welfare entitlements and private charities, but these measures are designed for subsistence, not restoration of self-esteem." In Orange County there are shelters that are designed for restoration of self-esteem and not merely for subsistence.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: Shelter Stampede, a boot stompin' hoedown staged by the Friends of Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter. Saturday's dinner-dance took place at Bommer Canyon in Irvine and raised funds for the Costa Mesa-based homeless shelter. Taste of the West: More than 150 suburban cowboys in blue jeans and boots gathered at the old cattle camp for what gala chairwoman Susan Leibel called "a western adult fantasy night."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1988
Thank you for your article on Hunger in Orange County (Oct. 16). The image of a 95-year-old woman existing on only one meal a day and of parents who cannot feed their children will not leave me. I applaud all the schools and organizations listed that will accept food donations, but why not all schools, all churches, all synagogues, all colleges, and all city halls? Hunger in Orange County should be everyone's concern. I challenge each of us to collect, bring or send food and/or a check to Share Our Selves in Costa Mesa, to the Southwest Center in Santa Ana, or any other agency that performs the vital community responsibility of feeding the hungry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995
What: Teachers. Where: Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter. Mission: To teach clerical and computer skills to clients of the shelter so that they can find jobs. Information: (714) 631-7213. --COMPILED BY MIMI KO CRUZ
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994
Your article "Residents Want Costa Mesa to Oust 3 Charities" (Nov. 22) reports ". . . that some residents want the charities out because they are magnets for street people." Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter was named as one of the three charities. For 13 years, Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter has helped the homeless become housed. We have an 84% success rate in moving graduates into permanent homes. One-third of our clients are young children. They do not fit a stereotype of street people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1994 | TOM RAGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three of the city's most respected charities for the homeless are under attack by some residents, who contend the organizations and others are "magnets" for street people and want the city to revoke their permits to operate. Citing thefts, car burglaries and acts of random violence by the homeless, the residents said they would like to see other cities share the burden of caring for Costa Mesa's estimated 1,500 street people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Residents of the Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter were pleased by a visit Wednesday from local business people and others who donated $10,000 each to sponsor a family's living quarters. Five of the shelter's 18 bedrooms for families have been supported for a year, thanks to a new "adopt-a-unit" fund-raising project. At a breakfast Wednesday, representatives of Taco Bell Corp., ITT Federal Bank, Cerplex Inc. and St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
The Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter has expanded, adding four new family apartment units that will increase the occupancy from 12 to 20 families. Families staying in the shelter's older units will be moved into the new units as soon as the city issues permits, which may be by the end of this week, said Director Cindy Heifner. The new units are bright and airy, with large open living rooms, dining rooms and kitchen areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Residents of the Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter were pleased by a visit Wednesday from local business people and others who donated $10,000 each to sponsor a family's living quarters. Five of the shelter's 18 bedrooms for families have been supported for a year, thanks to a new "adopt-a-unit" fund-raising project. At a breakfast Wednesday, representatives of Taco Bell Corp., ITT Federal Bank, Cerplex Inc. and St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1989
As we stood by our Food for All display in front of a market in Costa Mesa last week trying to encourage participation in Food for All by raising awareness of hunger, a poignant encounter took place. A young woman showed interest in our information. The young woman commented that she hoped people would help soon because she was looking for a place to find food on Saturday and Sunday. She told us she was homeless, living in some bushes near a building, and had recently had a baby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of California's closely knit community of homeless advocates acknowledged Tuesday that they began to suspect that prominent activist Scott Mather had sold them questionable insurance policies months before his public admission. But they denied covering up his activities to protect their own programs.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school and college students--so often portrayed as children of the Me Decade--have become eager participants in a new program to tutor homeless children, the program's creators say. Guy Foresman, a student minister at the United Church of Christ in Corona del Mar, said he was overwhelmed by the students' response to his plan for using volunteers to teach children of the Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter.
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