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Orange County Animal Control Department

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1998 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A severe overpopulation of unwanted cats has prompted the Orange County Animal Control Department to propose that all adopted cats be sterilized before leaving the shelter. Under the plan, people adopting the cats would pay a $20 charge to cover the cost of the procedure, which would be performed by private veterinarians.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday, one day after being placed on administrative leave while the county investigates mounting problems at the animal shelter in Orange. Dr. Richard H. Evans, who was chief of veterinary services in the Health Care Agency since 1992, submitted a letter of resignation to the agency, county officials said. He could not be reached Tuesday for comment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a Jan. 1 deadline to comply with a state law, Orange County animal shelter officials are seeking approval at Tuesday's Board of Supervisors meeting for a controversial program of spaying and neutering dogs. Critics say the plan was sloppily thrown together by officials who have yet to explain its details to the shelter's own advisory board, which meets tonight. "Their proposal is to spay and neuter at the shelter," said one of the critics, Sherry Meddick.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday in the midst of a county investigation of its troubled animal shelter and a disease outbreak that has infected and killed dozens of cats, including some taken home for adoption. Dr. Richard Evans, 53, resigned in the face of an inquiry that could have led to his firing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday, one day after being placed on administrative leave while the county investigates mounting problems at the animal shelter in Orange. Dr. Richard H. Evans, who was chief of veterinary services in the Health Care Agency since 1992, submitted a letter of resignation to the agency, county officials said. He could not be reached Tuesday for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To stem a feline distemper outbreak that has plagued Orange County's largest animal shelter since October, all cats with symptoms of the highly contagious disease will be destroyed and healthy cats isolated in separate cages, county health officials said Thursday. And in a reversal of existing policy, officials at the county shelter in Orange were ordered Thursday to begin immediate vaccinations for all cats kept at the shelter. Shelter officials had opposed that step as ineffective and costly.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday in the midst of a county investigation of its troubled animal shelter and a disease outbreak that has infected and killed dozens of cats, including some taken home for adoption. Dr. Richard Evans, 53, resigned in the face of an inquiry that could have led to his firing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1990 | SHANNON SANDS
The loud bangs and bright lights of the Fourth of July might be fun for people, but they can be petrifying for cats and dogs. "This is the busiest time of year for us because of fireworks," said Kevin Whelan, acting chief of field services for the Orange County Animal Control Department. "The noise causes a lot of emotional distress for the animals." On the Fourth, the department is traditionally overwhelmed with calls about missing pets and others being hit by cars, Whelan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1986 | Roxana Kopetman \f7
Joseph W. Randazzo and his dog, Boots, took their regular walk Sunday without the agitation that accompanied the routine stroll the previous day. It was during a walk through the neighborhood Saturday that Boots spotted something running across land that was being developed at El Toro and Trabuco roads. "I saw him starting to chase something. Whatever it was, it looked big," Randazzo said. What it was, the 49-year-old man soon discovered, was a bobcat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Carrying a bucket of oats, Autrey Ehler anxiously joined a group of people waiting for the Orange County Animal Shelter to open Friday morning. But while most were there to pick up runaway cats and dogs, Ehler was there to retrieve a larger pet: his horse. When Ehler arrived at his Nellie Gail Ranch home Thursday afternoon, he discovered that his quarter horse Mystique was missing. In her place was a citation from the Orange County Animal Control Department saying the horse had been impounded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To stem a feline distemper outbreak that has plagued Orange County's largest animal shelter since October, all cats with symptoms of the highly contagious disease will be destroyed and healthy cats isolated in separate cages, county health officials said Thursday. And in a reversal of existing policy, officials at the county shelter in Orange were ordered Thursday to begin immediate vaccinations for all cats kept at the shelter. Shelter officials had opposed that step as ineffective and costly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a Jan. 1 deadline to comply with a state law, Orange County animal shelter officials are seeking approval at Tuesday's Board of Supervisors meeting for a controversial program of spaying and neutering dogs. Critics say the plan was sloppily thrown together by officials who have yet to explain its details to the shelter's own advisory board, which meets tonight. "Their proposal is to spay and neuter at the shelter," said one of the critics, Sherry Meddick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1998 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A severe overpopulation of unwanted cats has prompted the Orange County Animal Control Department to propose that all adopted cats be sterilized before leaving the shelter. Under the plan, people adopting the cats would pay a $20 charge to cover the cost of the procedure, which would be performed by private veterinarians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1992 | THUAN LE and NIESON HIMMEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eleven horses escaped from a boarding stable early Friday and wandered onto the Riverside Freeway, where three were killed by vehicles in the pre-dawn darkness. A fourth suffered broken legs and was destroyed. The surviving horses were herded back to Coal Canyon Stables, where they had escaped from fenced pastures and ventured onto the freeway about 1:45 a.m. "I've been working here 10 years and this is the worst incident I've had to handle," said Sgt.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | THUAN LE and NIESON HIMMEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eleven horses escaped from a boarding stable early Friday and galloped onto the Riverside Freeway, where three of the animals were killed on impact by cars in the pre-dawn darkness and another suffered broken legs and had to be destroyed. The surviving animals were herded after the 1:45 a.m. mishap back to Coal Canyon Stables, where they had escaped from fenced pastures and wandered onto the freeway. "I've been working here 10 years and this is the worst incident I've had to handle," said Sgt.
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