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Orange County Animal Shelter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001
Re "Animal Control and Cost Issues" (Orange County Editorial, May 6), on cities seeking to cut ties with the Orange County Animal Shelter: I hope all Orange County cities look to Irvine and Mission Viejo as models for how good a shelter for animals can be. They are clean, with large exercise runs for dogs and cat rooms with lots of space. They are mostly staffed by wonderful volunteers. Extended adoption programs funded through fund-raising and dedicated veterinary staffs provide terrific care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001
Re "Animal Control and Cost Issues" (Orange County Editorial, May 6), on cities seeking to cut ties with the Orange County Animal Shelter: I hope all Orange County cities look to Irvine and Mission Viejo as models for how good a shelter for animals can be. They are clean, with large exercise runs for dogs and cat rooms with lots of space. They are mostly staffed by wonderful volunteers. Extended adoption programs funded through fund-raising and dedicated veterinary staffs provide terrific care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | HELAINE OLEN
Business is up at the Orange County Animal Shelter in Orange this week because of an influx of dogs that became runaways after the recent wet and windy weather. "We are definitely getting more dogs right now due to the storms," said Marie Hewett-Curtner, public education coordinator at the shelter. "Many people just have back-yard dogs, and when the fence blows down, they run away, and then they have no idea how to get back home."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerns about costs and convenience have led six north Orange County cities to consider ending their animal care contracts with the county and creating their own joint animal shelter. Such a move would eliminate more than one-third from Orange County Animal Care Services' budget from city contracts and force it to scale back on plans for a new shelter in Tustin in two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY
With spring being the peak of "kitten season," the Orange County Animal Shelter will have its annual Adopt-a-Pet Day on Saturday to help find homes for young felines. Dogs also will be available for adoption at the event, held in conjunction with national Be Kind to Animals Month. "It's usually a very successful event," said Lt. Mary Van Holt, an animal control officer at the county regional shelter in Orange. She predicted that between 80 and 100 dogs and cats will be placed in homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998
As we enjoy the holiday season and the gift-giving that is so much a part of the celebration, I'd like to remind people that animals should not be given as presents. Many of the puppies and kittens received as gifts are cute and adorable on Christmas morning. However, they soon grow; they don't seem as cute. They are often discarded in parks, along freeways, and even dumped in trash cans. Their unconditional love and loyalty rewarded with mistreatment and abandonment! It's the holiday season but the Animal Assistance League of Orange County doesn't take a holiday from helping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994
To help observe Be Kind to Animals Month and to celebrate the grand reopening of the Orange County Animal Shelter, the county facility will hold Adopt a Pet Day on Saturday . Free spaying and neutering will be available for any pet adopted at the shelter that day. Exhibits from animal care organizations, a dog show, photo and poster contest also will highlight the event from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the shelter, 531 The City Drive in Orange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1999 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His jowls swaying in the breeze, a salt-and-pepper Great Dane squinted into the sun at the Orange County Animal Shelter Friday afternoon, casting a stately but disgruntled profile on the walls of his metal cage. "I came by earlier, and he gave me a big woof," said Tricia James, the shelter's public education officer. "I don't think he's very happy about being here." The old boy doesn't know the half of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO and DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An almost 4-year-long battle over the accidental death of a dog at the county's animal shelter ended abruptly Tuesday when a member of the Board of Supervisors yanked the leash on county lawyers who wanted to continue the fight. Supervisor Todd Spitzer scolded lawyers who urged that the county appeal a $3,000 judgment over the death of Madeline, a 2-year-old Catahoula hound owned by William and Shirley Simon of Yorba Linda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1999
The Orange County Animal Shelter has the daunting task of trying to comply with a law to take effect Jan. 1 that will require the neutering of stray animals before they are adopted. If the timetable proves too ambitious, the county should seek help in Sacramento. The new law requires dogs and cats to be neutered before being put up for adoption. Critics say the county has been slow in developing a plan to meet the requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001 | Sharon Nagy, (714) 966-5832
The Orange County Health Care Agency has appointed Dr. Kristi Fisher manager of veterinary services at the county's animal shelter. Fisher is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Assn., the Southern California Veterinary Medical Assn. and the American Assn. of Feline Practitioners. She previously worked for the Cat Care Clinic in Orange. Fisher, a Rancho Santa Margarita resident, has a doctor of veterinary medicine degree from UC Davis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2000 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Ann Ryan Johnson is used to coming to the rescue. And that's just what Orange County's troubled animal shelter needs from the newly appointed director of Animal Care Services. As a child in San Juan Capistrano, Johnson often surprised her parents with strays she rescued from the street, nursing them back to health and begging to keep them as pets. By age 11, she was well on her way to fulfilling her life's ambition and passion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of the grand jury's recommendations for the county's animal shelter have been implemented, the county has yet to hire a permanent director and a chief veterinarian, county officials said Tuesday. In June, the grand jury reported that the shelter, which handles more than 50,000 animals a year, has "not always met our high expectations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To improve its handling of animals, the county's Animal Care Services needs to conduct a nationwide search for a shelter director, hire a chief veterinarian and review staffing levels, the Orange County Grand Jury said Monday. Animal Care Services handles more than 50,000 animals a year, but the agency "has not always met our high expectations," jurors noted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to burnish its image, the county's animal shelter held an open house Sunday to showcase improved facilities for dogs and cats, as well as expanded hours for adoptions. Hundreds of people attended the event, snapping up dogs and cats on a day the shelter used to be closed. The most popular were kittens: 15 of 16 available for adoption were gone within 40 minutes of the shelter's 10 a.m. opening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2000
Re "Restore Animal Shelter's Image," Jan. 7 editorial: Why did it take so long to get some action by the county to start to clean up the deplorable conditions at the Orange County Animal Shelter? Most people who visit that shelter to adopt never come back. It is a relic of the dark ages, and the memory of my visit there almost 17 years ago still haunts me. My visits to other city or private shelters, such as those in Irvine and Mission Viejo, on the other hand, were pleasant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1999 | IOANA PATRINGENARU and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For business owners and home buyers, location is important. For stray or unwanted pets in Orange County, it's a matter of life or death. Shelters serving some well-heeled South County cities can afford to keep animals almost indefinitely, pushing euthanasia rates down as low as 4%. By contrast, half or more are killed at shelters serving many North County cities, where there is room to keep pets for only a few days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Carrying a bucket of oats, Autrey Ehler anxiously joined a group of people waiting for the Orange County Animal Shelter to open Friday morning. But while most were there to pick up runaway cats and dogs, Ehler was there to retrieve a larger pet: his horse. When Ehler arrived at his Nellie Gail Ranch home Thursday afternoon, he discovered that his quarter horse Mystique was missing. In her place was a citation from the Orange County Animal Control Department saying the horse had been impounded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A new chief veterinarian was appointed by the county Wednesday to help clean up the county-run shelter and end a feline distemper outbreak that has killed dozens of cats at the aging facility. Even as Dr. Todd Kopit was accepting the interim post in the wake of his predecessor's resignation the day before, county officials began talking about revamping the shelter, which has been under fire from residents and veterinarians for outdated practices and a resistance to change.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday in the midst of a county investigation of its troubled animal shelter and a disease outbreak that has infected and killed dozens of cats, including some taken home for adoption. Dr. Richard Evans, 53, resigned in the face of an inquiry that could have led to his firing.
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