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Orange County Annual Survey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987 | JESS BRAVIN, Times Staff Writer
Dissatisfaction with traffic congestion and concern over rampant development, along with a growing fear of the future, have characterized the Orange County depicted over the past five years in UC Irvine professor Mark Baldassare's Orange County Annual Survey. The five previous reports have shown residents enjoying income and amenities that often far surpassed those of the nation as a whole.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999 | MARK BALDASSARE and CHERYL KATZ, Mark Baldassare, the Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management at UC Irvine and a senior fellow of the Public Policy Institute of California, and research associate Cheryl Katz are co-directors of the Orange County Annual Survey
Orange County is heading into the next century with an outstanding bill of health. The county's overall mood is at its most upbeat ever, and consumer confidence is at an all-time high, according to the 1999 Orange County Annual Survey, which we conduct each year at UC Irvine. Residents' ratings of the county's economy, quality of life and housing market are also at peak levels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1988 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
In findings that pollster Mark Baldassare said represented a "dramatic" shift in the pattern of recent years, its residents are generally increasingly optimistic about the county's future, according to the 1988 Orange County Annual Survey released Monday. The primary reason for this new-found optimism is a perception among residents that traffic conditions, which they view as the county's No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1998
Orange County's quality of life is rated high, confidence in the economy is up and even faith in county government is on the rebound for the first time since the county's bankruptcy four years ago, according to UC Irvine's annual snapshot of the county's mood. So what has even survey directors puzzled is why crime shows up as the most important problem in a county where the crime rate has been dropping steadily for the past few years. Crime worries topped the list for 30% of those interviewed.
NEWS
February 25, 1988
For the first time in the history of the Orange County Annual Survey, a majority of county residents (51%) want to see new freeways built. The greatest amount of support was centered in South County. Throughout the county the greatest support comes from residents between the ages of 35 and 64 whose annual income exceeds $50,000.
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Susan Greene and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times; Page designed by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Last grade finished 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 College graduate 38% 41% 41% 37% 33% Some college 38 36 31 37 36 High school graduate 20 18 24 23 26 Some high school or less 4 5 4 3 5 Source: Orange County Annual Survey by Mark Baldassare, UCI
NEWS
December 10, 1989
The findings of today's Los Angeles Times Poll, which suggests that Southern Californians in general are willing to tolerate substantial life style and economic inconveniences for the sake of the environment, are in striking contrast to the results of the 1989 Orange County Annual Survey, released last Monday. Both polls did show that residents living in Los Angeles and Orange counties agree that their quality of life has declined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years after Orange County voted overwhelmingly for an anti-illegal immigration initiative, a new survey reports that county residents are far less likely than people across the nation to view immigrants as a burden on society. More than half of those surveyed by UC Irvine also said society should accept homosexuality as a way of life, another view at odds with Orange County's conservative reputation and nationwide polling.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shaking off the pessimism brought on by economic woes earlier in the decade, Orange County residents are more ebullient about their future and quality of life now than they have been since the late 1980s, according to a major public opinion survey released Monday.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shaking off the pessimism brought on by previous economic woes, Orange County residents are more ebullient about their future and quality of life than they have been since the late 1980s, according to a major public opinion survey released Monday.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1996 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County's rebounding economy this year has sparked confidence in its long-struggling housing market, according to the Orange County Annual Survey released Monday by UC Irvine. Sixty percent of homeowners surveyed earlier this fall said they thought buying a home in Orange County was an excellent or good investment, up 10% from last year.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite having a conservative reputation, Orange County residents overwhelmingly favor liberal approaches toward AIDS education and awareness, according to a poll released Wednesday. Ninety-one percent favor junior and senior high schools teaching AIDS prevention, while 76% back teaching children about AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases in the early grades, according to a special segment of the 1995 Orange County Annual Survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1995
The 1990s have been a bruising time for Orange County, from recession at the beginning of the decade to the bankruptcy that was declared a year ago and continues today. Small wonder residents feel buffeted. The changes over the years can be measured by the results of the Orange County annual survey, a measurement of the county's economic, political and social condition as seen through residents' eyes. Mark Baldassare and Cheryl Katz of UC Irvine have conducted the survey for 14 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1988
UC Irvine social ecology professor Mark Baldassare, who directs an annual survey of changing trends in Orange County, has received the 1988 Academic Excellence Award from the Orange County chapter of the American Society for Public Administration. Robert Dunek, executive director of the Santa Ana-based Orange County League of Cities, praised Baldassare at the recent award ceremonies.
NEWS
June 11, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Henry Rivero and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times, Page designed by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Insofar as the quality of life in the Big Orange is concerned, county residents report, overwhelmingly, that it is positive. Nearly nine out of 10 say it is going either "very well" (37%) or "somewhat well" (50%). Money and outlook live together, though, as the table below illustrates.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still seething with bitterness, Orange County residents appear poised to dramatically reshape county government in the wake of the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history, according to a major public opinion survey released Monday. Overarching worries about the county's fiscal debacle knocked off crime and immigration as the top concerns among residents, according to the Orange County Annual Survey.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still seething with bitterness, Orange County residents appear poised to dramatically reshape county government in the wake of the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history, according to a major public opinion survey released Monday. Overarching worries about the county's fiscal debacle knocked off crime and immigration as the top concerns among residents, according to the Orange County Annual Survey.
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