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Orange County Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As public hearings on the Orange County budget opened Tuesday, health care representatives urged the Board of Supervisors to increase funding to hospitals that are bearing the burden of providing free medical services to poor people. "Get real on funding the (Medical Services for Indigents) program," said Edward J. Foley, vice president of the Hospital Council of Southern California. "You must at least pay a fair share."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer, Pfeifer is a Times staff writer.
One day after disclosing plans to lay off 210 social services workers, Orange County budget officials said Thursday that they are forecasting an $84-million budget gap for the next fiscal year and are considering additional layoffs in other county departments. The forecast underscores the bleak economic outlook for the year to come, with dwindling funds from sales and property taxes and a sharp reduction in state funds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a quick review of Gov. George Deukmejian's proposed $53-billion state spending plan for the next fiscal year, Orange County budget analysts are hoping for answers from the small, financially troubled county of Butte. "Butte County is kind of a bellwether," said John Sibley, Orange County's chief budget analyst. "It is like a forecaster." Last year, the Northern California county announced that it was $3.5 million short of balancing its $130-million budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer, Pfeifer is a Times staff writer
In its latest attempt to address a gloomy economic forecast, Orange County has imposed an across-the-board hiring freeze and begun preparations to trim more than $60 million from its budget, officials said Monday. The freeze comes as Orange County budget officials confront a drop in sales tax revenue, possible reductions in state financing and another byproduct of a down economy -- fewer people willingly leaving their jobs.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While other Orange County department heads were crunching numbers or seeking out supervisors in quiet discussions of a looming budget crisis, Sheriff Brad Gates reacted to the prospect of a $6.5-million cut in his operation with all the diplomacy of a jackhammer. At a news conference last week, his top aides said there was no choice but to shut down the minimum security James A. Musick Branch Jail in Irvine and release inmates to the streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A preliminary Orange County budget that would add more than 100 new jobs and restore some programs slashed in the wake of the bankruptcy won qualified support Tuesday from county supervisors, who vowed to scale back some spending increases during budget deliberations this summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proposed cuts in the Orange County budget for the 1990-91 fiscal year would put more criminals on the streets with depleted sheriff's patrols to pursue them and fewer prosecutors to send them to jail, county officials warned the Board of Supervisors in a bleak session Wednesday. That was only the beginning. Jail overcrowding, already a serious problem in the county, would probably increase, as would police response times, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 200 county government jobs are being axed under the final proposed Orange County budget, and officials said Thursday that they will have to make their first layoffs in 13 years if the Board of Supervisors adopts the plan next week. Although budget officers have spared about 100 positions during the complicated talks of the past few weeks, proposed cutbacks in law enforcement and other services rocked some county officials. The proposed $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's power woes will force Orange County to spend at least $7.7 million more in the next fiscal year on energy-related bills, including higher electricity costs, according to the county's proposed $4.6-billion budget unveiled Wednesday. Energy costs are projected to rise 40% to an estimated $19.5 million from $13.6 million for the current year, which ends June 30. That is enough to represent a "big hit" to the budget, said Gary Burton, the county's chief financial officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer, Pfeifer is a Times staff writer.
One day after disclosing plans to lay off 210 social services workers, Orange County budget officials said Thursday that they are forecasting an $84-million budget gap for the next fiscal year and are considering additional layoffs in other county departments. The forecast underscores the bleak economic outlook for the year to come, with dwindling funds from sales and property taxes and a sharp reduction in state funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2007 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Despite a slowdown in tax revenue growth, Orange County supervisors adopted a $5.9-billion budget Tuesday for the coming fiscal year that avoided some of the steepest recommended cuts. The budget represents a 6.2% increase over last year's spending. The largest share will go to community services, including healthcare and social services, followed by road maintenance, flood control, libraries, waste management, tidelands and other infrastructure and environmental needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
As Orange County supervisors try to balance a budget with $130 million less than this year's, health officials plan to severely cut mental health services, close eight part-time clinics and reduce staff for sexually transmitted disease testing. Although the Board of Supervisors increased the county Health Care Agency's budget 5% for the fiscal year beginning July 1, department officials say higher care costs mean they would have to get $23 million more to keep services at current levels.
OPINION
March 16, 2003
If there was a bright spot in the hatcheting of $102 million from the Orange County budget, it was that the task was accomplished in a thoughtful, collegial manner. The most dismal aspect of the sad affair is that if the county received anything close to its fair share of state money, it would have funds to preserve much of the health care, child-abuse prevention and low-cost housing it is being forced to cut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's power woes will force Orange County to spend at least $7.7 million more in the next fiscal year on energy-related bills, including higher electricity costs, according to the county's proposed $4.6-billion budget, unveiled Wednesday. Energy costs are projected to rise 43% to about $19.5 million from $13.6 million for the current year, which ends June 30. That is enough of an increase to represent a "big hit" to the budget, said Gary Burton, the county's chief financial officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's power woes will force Orange County to spend at least $7.7 million more in the next fiscal year on energy-related bills, including higher electricity costs, according to the county's proposed $4.6-billion budget unveiled Wednesday. Energy costs are projected to rise 40% to an estimated $19.5 million from $13.6 million for the current year, which ends June 30. That is enough to represent a "big hit" to the budget, said Gary Burton, the county's chief financial officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's government, which already spends $12 million annually for electricity, should budget 40% more for the next fiscal year to keep pace with soaring power rates, a consultant said Wednesday. The recommended increase would be in addition to a $2.5-million increase approved by the Board of Supervisors for the current year, said Vicki L. Wilson, director of the county's Public Facilities and Resources Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1988 | DAVE LESHER, Times Staff Writer
Looking up from his copy of the proposed 1988-89 Orange County budget, a supervisor's aide shook his head recently and sighed, saying, "It's a hell of a way to run a railroad." Sometimes cliches are appropriate. Last week, the Board of Supervisors adopted the inch-thick, green-covered 1988-89 proposed budget that is now the foundation for operating the whole county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely two weeks after Orange County voters said overwhelmingly that tobacco funds should go mostly for health care, the Board of Supervisors on Monday decided to consider spending this year's $28-million allotment to pay off government debt instead. Health care advocates were stunned. Supervisors previously voted to divide this year's share of the national tobacco settlement funds, with half going toward health care programs and the remainder toward paying down the county's bankruptcy debt.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than $207 million worth of new carpool lanes and $10 million for a death investigation training center were among those big-ticket Orange County items at stake in an evolving state budget Friday. After Senate approval of a $100-billion budget on Thursday, lobbyists and municipal officials throughout Orange County scrambled Friday to ensure that their pet projects would win the necessary approval in the Assembly and on the governor's desk.
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