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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
Hoping to entice more residents to donate their time, the Board of Supervisors has decided to hire a coordinator to oversee all volunteer activities and internships in county government. Supervisor Jim Silva, who proposed the new position, said the coordinator will help match volunteers to county departments in need as well as establish contact with schools, senior citizen groups and other organizations whose members might want to offer their time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
Hoping to entice more residents to donate their time, the Board of Supervisors has decided to hire a coordinator to oversee all volunteer activities and internships in county government. Supervisor Jim Silva, who proposed the new position, said the coordinator will help match volunteers to county departments in need as well as establish contact with schools, senior citizen groups and other organizations whose members might want to offer their time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1988
City Councilman Chris Keena has been selected as an alternate to the City-County Coordinating Committee of the Orange County Division of California Cities. The purpose of the committee is to coordinate the efforts of 27 cities of Orange County and county government on common issues. The county's mayors, voting members of the local California Cities division, voted 25 to 2 earlier this month to name Keena as an alternate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON
After a scandal that enveloped a South County water district, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a $37,600 contract for the Orange County Grand Jury to study the possible benefits of merging at least four agencies that provide water to local districts. The inquiry, hailed by board Chairwoman Harriett M. Wieder as a step toward slicing expensive government bureaucracy, will examine the agencies' overall efficiency of water distribution.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having already gained notoriety for gambling away taxpayers' money through bad investments, Orange County is coming under scrutiny once again--this time on Capitol Hill, where lawmakers will study how the county is handling the financial fallout. The answer is, not very well, according to some of those scheduled to testify today and Thursday before a House Banking subcommittee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992 | WILLIAM E. HODGE, William E. Hodge is executive director of the Orange County division of the League of California Cities
Proposition 13, the major symbol of California's oft-canonized property taxpayer revolt, was the first great wave of change in local government financing that challenged cities to trim the fat from municipal budgets and streamline service delivery. Even as that measure is challenged in the state and federal Supreme Courts, a new set of breakers is poised to crash upon our cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1995
Re: The editorial "Style of Government Only Part of Solution," Dec. 10: Finally, someone realizes that the officials should be held responsible for the success or failure of Orange County's governmental issues. Instead of focusing on electing capable people to office, society gets wrapped up in how we can alter the system to make it look like progress is being made. Yet how can we think this is progress if the new system we are converting to also has almost failed? The blame needs to be placed back on the officials who haven't fulfilled their jobs, but have come up with excuses of how it was not their fault or are too busy running their next political campaign to do their job. If the style of government is not working, something should be done, but the officials in power should be accountable for their errors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997 | MARY ANN SCHULTE and WILLIAM MITCHELL, Mary Ann Schulte of Huntington Beach and William Mitchell of Irvine served as chair and vice chair respectively of the Government Practices Oversight Committee
A year ago, a diverse committee of Orange County citizens issued a comprehensive, analytical report that examined government in Orange County, primarily county government. This group of knowledgeable volunteers, the Government Practices Oversight Committee, had spent the previous 18 months compiling data, reviewing government operations and budgets, conducting focus groups with both county employees and users of county services, surveying the public and evaluating options for change.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever feel like muttering "huh?" during some abstruse modern dance performance? Deborah Brockus has. She's even choreographed an ode to the obscure. * "It's my satire on inaccessible art--my piece about all the bad shows I've seen in the past 10 years," says Brockus, whose troupe performs at the Orange County High School for the Arts in Los Alamitos this weekend. "Huh--The Odyssey" is done in a deadpan sort of way.
OPINION
October 1, 1995 | William Fulton, William Fulton is editor of California Planning & Development Report, a monthly newsletter. His book on the politics of urban planning in Southern California will be published by Solano Press Books
Nearly a year after bankruptcy, Orange County is in the throes of a dramatic soul-searching about how to govern itself. So far, county voters appear ready to get rid of an elected treasurer, privatize nearly the entire government and, in a reversal of 80 years of Progressive-era politics, create a powerful, centralized county executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2000 | JERRY HICKS
My neighbors and I in Anaheim enjoy a beautiful park next to our homes. This past week it hasn't been so beautiful. One or more anti-Fourth of July revelers spray-painted the bathroom building with ugly orange and black graffiti. As a reporter, I've written dozens of stories about graffiti. But I guess it has to happen to you before you understand the anger and sadness it creates. This graffiti stood as a ghastly blight. And, unfortunately, graffiti crime is back on the rise, says Det.
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