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NEWS
April 3, 2000 | DAVID COLKER, TIME STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County court system has come up with a new jury summons form so dense that even some judges can't make sense of it. The form, resembling a cross between a mortgage application and a deli menu, has generated a flood of complaints--including one from a Pasadena resident called to jury duty: Judge Lance Ito. He filled it out incorrectly. "Even the IRS couldn't dream up something so complicated!" Ito fumed. "Holy smokes, this is horrible."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 4th District Court of Appeal in Santa Ana has issued an order in the case of Costa Mesa teenager Arthur Carmona that requires the Orange County Superior Court to consider new evidence in the case. Attorneys for Carmona, 18, who was sentenced to 12 years in prison in a controversial robbery case, filed an appeal in January arguing that the boy's first lawyer failed to interview several witnesses that could have provided solid alibis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for a Costa Mesa teenager sentenced to 12 years in prison in a controversial robbery case filed an appeal Monday arguing that the boy's first lawyer failed to interview several witnesses who could have provided solid alibis. Arthur Carmona, 17, is being held at a California Youth Authority facility in Ione, near Sacramento. He is expected to be transferred to an adult prison within weeks when he turns 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has long been known that close supervision can prevent drug-addicted criminals from becoming repeat offenders. That has spawned a national system of 600 drug courts that provide treatment and counseling to inmates as an alternative to regular jail time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has long been known that close supervision can prevent drug-addicted criminals from becoming repeat offenders. That has spawned a national system of 600 drug courts that provide treatment and counseling to inmates as an alternative to regular jail time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bryan Ray Kazarian, a deputy Orange County prosecutor indicted on conspiracy charges for his alleged involvement in an elaborate drug and money-laundering ring, pleaded not guilty Monday to the federal charges against him. Kazarian, 35, of Aliso Viejo, is the first county prosecutor in memory to be charged with a felony. His trial is scheduled for Aug. 10 in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana. He faces 10 years to life in prison if convicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key witness whose testimony helped condemn a Costa Mesa teenager to 12 years behind bars on robbery charges told him in a letter that she's "been crying since I found out you were sentenced." "I believe there is a very strong possibility I made a very horrible mistake," Casey Becerra wrote in the letter that Arthur Carmona received in jail last week. "I don't expect you or your family to ever forgive me. I don't know that I can forgive myself."
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second juror in the case against teenager Arthur Carmona has come forward to publicly question his armed-robbery conviction with allegations that, if true, could constitute juror misconduct and provide grounds for a new trial, his attorneys say. Sandra Dinardo, 56, an Aliso Viejo homemaker, said Thursday that she is haunted by the thought that she may have sent an innocent young man to prison.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are witnesses to depravity who often get forgotten once they leave the jury box. Jurors in sensational trials--such as the 12 Orange County residents now deciding whether serial killer Charles Ng should die for his crimes--are forced to confront a haunting side of human nature. And what they see is often hard to shake. Until recently, jurors left court with little more than a cursory "thank you" from the judge, forcing them to deal alone with the emotional after-effects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999
A retired Orange County judge who was accused by a state panel this week of willful misconduct and partiality will respond to the allegations and expects to be exonerated, his attorney said Friday. Judge Luis A. Cardenas, 56, is accused by the state Commission on Judicial Performance of releasing nearly a dozen suspects over three years at the request of longtime friend and defense attorney Leonard Basinger.
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