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Orange County Development And Redevelopment

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May 12, 1991 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If these buildings last as long as those of the ancient Incas and Mayans, future archeologists might someday be plumbing the remnants of a series of huge, handsomely appointed structures scattered throughout Orange County. Mostly in the southern half of the county, these structures would be found situated like major temples in the midst of vast green parklands.
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NEWS
March 11, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE EVAN HALPER and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Buffa looks at the El Toro debate--the whole wrangling, two-fisted brawl--and sees a movie. "Jaws," to be exact. "When 'Jaws' came along . . . it became bigger than just a film," said Buffa, a political analyst and former Costa Mesa City Council member. "And El Toro has become much bigger than just a political issue." In the near-decade since the Pentagon announced that it would close the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, the fate of the 4,700-acre airfield has dominated local politics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after Gov. Gray Davis took office, planners at the California Department of Parks and Recreation are still moving ahead with a controversial Wilson-era effort to place a private luxury resort on public land inside Crystal Cove State Park. Many environmentalists hope Davis will swiftly put the brakes on the project to transform the park's colony of beachfront cottages into an upscale tourist enclave with overnight rates of up to $400.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2002 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historical and religious significance of a tiny, ancient wall carving that might be bulldozed to make way for 2,500 homes has prompted growing debate between local American Indian groups and Irvine Co. The carving looks like little more than a doodle, according to archeologists who have seen it--a wavy line about 4 inches long with a circle at one end. It was cut into the wall of a shallow cave by a Native American almost 2,000 years ago on what is now Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Environmentalists opposed to the controversial San Joaquin Hills tollway were biding their time, waiting for the right moment to take their case against the 15-mile, $793-million project before a federal judge. But tollway officials, seeking to derail their longtime nemeses and speed construction, have hit upon an unusual but not unprecedented tactic.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | SCOTT HAYS, Scott Hays is a regular contributor to Orange County View.
North American Indians always have held close spiritual ties with their ancestors. So when charges surface that human remains and religious artifacts from sacred Indian burial grounds have been unearthed by developers and tossed in a scrap heap, kin groups and tribal elders go on the warpath. "We believe the remains of our people are sacred," says Vera Rocha, chairwoman of the Gabrieleno Indian Tribe, whose ancestors once occupied the hilly lands near Newport Beach.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joining a growing list of aging Orange County malls lined up for a face-lift, the owners of the weary Mission Viejo Mall said Thursday they are launching the long-awaited renovation of their center. And in news that's likely to cheer upscale South County shoppers, they announced that tony Saks Fifth Avenue will join Nordstrom as an anchor store at the mall. "That's quite a coup for us," said Art Spellmeyer, senior vice president of development for the Simon DeBartolo Group, which owns the mall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After two months of public hearings and community workshops, the San Clemente Planning Commission this week approved a developer's proposal to build homes and a shopping center on one of the last undeveloped areas of Orange County's coastline. The plan by Irvine-based Lusk Holding Co. for the 250-acre Marblehead property calls for 434 homes, a retail center and entertainment complex between Interstate 5 and the city's historic North Beach area.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Signaling what may be a new wave of hotel development, two companies have purchased land for three new hotels with a total of more than 250 rooms in and around this planned community in South County. Denver-based Stonebridge Companies, which operates 16 hotels in the Western U.S., has purchased four acres fronting the Foothill Transportation Corridor near Lake Forest Drive for $1.84 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Orange County's biggest landowners is smoothing the path for bulldozers--and earning millions of dollars plus tax breaks--with a legal tool designed to preserve land from development. Following a trend growing nationwide, the Rancho Mission Viejo Co. is using the so-called conservation easements to facilitate development as much as to protect land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A by-the-numbers look at the so-called Great Park initiative shows it would not create any new taxes or tax increases, the Orange County auditor said Friday. But maintaining such a park at the former El Toro Marine base would cost the county $19 million over the next 18 years if it is approved by voters in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2001 | EVAN HALPER and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The cowboy developers at Rancho Mission Viejo scoff at the suggestion that they are just another bunch of megabuilders. After all, they still swing lassos and herd cattle even as they drive along plans to build 14,000 more homes on their south Orange County spread.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within the next few years, the construction of more than a dozen major religious buildings will give Orange County's spiritual skyline a more cosmopolitan feel, complete with a Buddhist monastery, one of the country's largest mosques and a $65-million Jewish community center. The building spree spans the county from Yorba Linda, where a mega-church is undergoing a $23.5-million expansion, to San Juan Capistrano, where a proposed $70-million Catholic high school hopes to find a home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001 | EVAN HALPER and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rancho Mission Viejo submitted its proposal Friday to build 14,000 homes on the last swath of privately owned land in south Orange County, a plan that immediately drew criticism from environmentalists. The development plan was filed with the county for 22,850 acres of the century-old O'Neill-Moiso family ranch in the hills above San Juan Capistrano. In addition to the housing, it calls for 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest twist in the El Toro airport debate, Orange County supervisors on Tuesday unexpectedly delayed for another week a pivotal vote to approve the airfield, bowing to demands that the public needed more time to comment on the plan. Supervisors have been deluged with letters and e-mails asking them to reopen public comments since last week's release of an airspace analysis by the Federal Aviation Administration. The county ended public comment on the plan on Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every flight preparing to land at John Wayne and Long Beach airports would be delayed 15 minutes to make room for each northbound jet leaving an El Toro airport, new figures released Saturday by the Federal Aviation Administration show.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not surprising that developers George Argyros and Gary Hunt grabbed lead roles in negotiations that led to the proposed plan that the Orange County Board of Supervisors has embraced as a springboard to a fiscal recovery. After all, developers will be hard-pressed to build homes and shopping centers if potential home buyers fear that streets won't be built, schoolchildren won't be educated and police departments won't be able to keep officers on their beats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 31 years, George Pulliam has lived in the natural quiet of Deer Canyon, his five acres sheltered by stands of eucalyptus trees and home to numerous native animals and plants. Pulliam has taken in stride the rise of housing tracts on nearby ridges and has tolerated the inevitable development of the area. But now Pulliam and some of his neighbors are fighting a city proposal to transform 130 acres of city-owned, undeveloped land in their area into a park preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As airports across the country postpone expansions in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Orange County is moving ahead with a new airport on the unaltered assumption that demand for flights will double in the next 20 years. The Board of Supervisors will vote Tuesday on final approval for a commercial airport at the former El Toro Marine Corps base, designed to become the second-largest airport in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's proposed airport at El Toro could be operated safely--but it would also create flight delays and inefficiencies across Southern California's already crowded skies, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. At times, as many as 24 flights arriving into John Wayne and Long Beach airports would be delayed up to eight minutes to make room for each flight leaving El Toro to the north, according to the long-awaited analysis of the county's plan, released Tuesday.
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