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Orange County Development And Redevelopment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 31 years, George Pulliam has lived in the natural quiet of Deer Canyon, his five acres sheltered by stands of eucalyptus trees and home to numerous native animals and plants. Pulliam has taken in stride the rise of housing tracts on nearby ridges and has tolerated the inevitable development of the area. But now Pulliam and some of his neighbors are fighting a city proposal to transform 130 acres of city-owned, undeveloped land in their area into a park preserve.
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NEWS
August 23, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As signs go, it wasn't fancy: standard state-issue green. But for the hundreds of Vietnamese refugees who witnessed its unveiling a decade ago, the "Little Saigon" freeway sign stood for a dream: the re-creation of a place that now exists only in their memories. "I knew I had lost my country, but to see another Saigon created by my own people . . .
BUSINESS
October 20, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL
In a deal that could create as many as 80 new jobs, the New Jersey baking company that operated the T.J. Cinnamon retail sweet roll chain has leased a 22,000-square-foot facility in Santa Ana for its first company-owned wholesale bakery. Paramark Enterprises Inc. plans to start production in November and is hiring about 20 experienced bakery workers, said Alan Gottlich, chief financial officer.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a traditional Southerner, Tristan Krogius blasphemes the North for its "subversion of democracy" and its "arrogant and unyielding" government. He defiantly warns of possible secession if the oppressors do not desist in their threat to his cherished way of life. "This is a bloody disaster," he fumes. "It means Civil War." This is not 1861. It is not the antebellum South of weeping willows, ladies in crinoline and gentlemen in frock coats.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
In the beginning--which for purposes of development pretty much means the 1950s in Orange County--nobody really cared where developers laid out subdivisions or erected stores. There was plenty of room, traffic was not a problem and most people thought all those new houses and stores and factories were a good thing. Now, however, putting a convenience store in some neighborhoods--let alone an office building--can mean a pitched battle with the neighbors.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The slow-growth movement, which has hopes of sweeping California like a Proposition 13 prairie fire, was given some painful political lessons in Tuesday's election. One was that a well-financed, well-planned advertising campaign, pointing out ambiguities and possible weaknesses of complex slow-growth citizen initiatives, can defeat them. That was demonstrated by the rejection Tuesday of such measures in Orange County and Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST and LEN HALL
Determined to control the development of a 10-acre oceanfront bluff, the city has hired a San Juan Capistrano councilman as a consultant to help it in a tug-of-war for building rights at the site, which borders the city near its northern end.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1998 | DARYL STRICKLAND, Daryl Strickland covers real estate for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5670, and at daryl.strickland@latimes.com
With property prices surging, PLC Land Co. and other developers still looking to build in Orange County are putting homes on unusual sites. Westridge, a 400-home development, is being built by PLC on a former Chevron oil-drilling site. The project is bounded by Idaho Street, Beach Boulevard and Imperial Highway in La Habra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The county's first telecommuting work center is scheduled to open here by the end of May, city officials say. The new facility would give county residents with lengthy commutes the option of working from the center instead of driving to their places of employment. It will be equipped with 20 workstations and will feature facsimile machines, a copy center, computer labs, a conference room and two-way video telephones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
The City Council has agreed to spend $247,156 more to complete planning and environmental studies that will guide proposed development of the environmentally sensitive Headlands. City Manager John B. Bahorski said the additional money will let the city complete the two studies at the same time. About $200,000 already has been set aside for the planning study. "We're trying to move the project along at a quicker pace," Bahorski said.
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