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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991 | ANITA M. CAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 14, Jackie Cervantes can already rattle off a list of friends who have dropped out of school and are struggling to survive on meager wages--that is, if they have a job at all. But Cervantes, an eighth-grader at Sierra Intermediate School, says that's not the route for her, certainly not since taking a class at school that shows students how hard it is to find a well-paying job without a high school diploma. "Dropping out is dumb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Schools need to better prepare for emergencies by providing detailed maps of their facilities and forming crisis response teams to quickly assume control in campus crises, Orange County educators were told Monday. While state law mandates that schools devise and update safety plans every March, security experts implored administrators during a conference at UC Irvine to do even more. Orange County schools Supt. William H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1989 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sixty-eight third-grade pupils at Sunkist Elementary School in Anaheim did so well on the latest California Assessment Program tests that even state officials were marveling Tuesday. "It's really very exceptional," said Tom Fong, a research analyst with the program, a unit of the California Department of Education. The average Sunkist scores for third-graders were 385 in reading, 407 in written expression and 425 in mathematics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Gross, superintendent of the Conejo Valley Unified School District for eight years, will take the top post in an Orange County district. The Saddleback Valley Unified School District Board of Education will meet Thursday to confirm Gross' appointment and finalize contract details, according to board member Nancy W. Kirkpatrick. Gross will start his new job Aug. 6. "There comes a time when you just know it's the right thing to do, so away we go," the 61-year-old Gross said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1986 | Bill Billiter
Education in Orange County faces some major political skirmishes in 1987. Bilingual education, a controversial but major learning tool in many Orange County school districts, most notably in Santa Ana, may end as a state program. The state bilingual education law expires in June, and Gov. George Deukmejian in September vetoed a bill that would have continued it. Despite strong Republican opposition, supporters of bilingual education will make another effort to pass a bill continuing the program.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunny Hills High is a public school with a zero percent dropout rate and no graffiti on the walls, a place where students brag about pulling all-nighters and compete in honors classes for the highest A-plus. Jackson Browne went there. So did All-Star major league catcher Gary Carter. Its reputation stretches across the Pacific Ocean, luring Korean immigrants in search of the best in American education, and to the elite Eastern colleges where graduates flock.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1982, Ronny Newman assumed the bold task of introducing his Laguna Beach High School students to a subject that at the time was considered virtually taboo. The Vietnam War was difficult to understand, and most teachers shied away from the daunting, controversial task of explaining why the United States had become embroiled in a war that bitterly divided the country and became a metaphor for political and military disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since August, 7-year-old Sean Young has been in a decidedly less-than-desirable school environment. His "classroom" has no walls. Its floors are made of dirt and brush. Its ceiling is the sky. Like other homeless children, Sean has had to make do with picnic tables or cramped campers when Ann Robinson--a county Department of Education teacher who travels to parks, motels and other areas frequented by the homeless--comes around with his lessons. But thanks to a $300,000 grant from the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely scraping by with report cards full of Ds, Michael Hairston nearly dropped out of school--until someone introduced him to a career that fueled a passion to turn his life around. "Once I was exposed to physical therapy, I said, 'Here's something I love to do and could do as a job,' " said Hairston, who now operates his own physical therapy business in Orange. "I went from being a D student to an A student, which is common for people when they find a place to go to work that is enjoyable."
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | STEVE EMMONS and TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tuition is $3,200 a year. It takes high entrance exam scores to get in, although family connections help. Some years, as many as 900 qualified applicants have been turned away. Athletic teams, supported by enthusiastic, generous alumni, have national reputations. Baseball and basketball teams have been ranked No. 1 in the nation. Despite complaints about recruiting violations, the athletic department never has received more than a one-year, wrist-slap probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
About 300 low-ranked schools that showed extraordinary gains in Stanford 9 scores will divvy up a $100-million state pot to reward teachers and principals, according to a list released Thursday by the California Department of Education. Because so many schools did well and the pot of money is fixed, those top 300 schools represent less than one-quarter of the 1,346 schools statewide that met the criteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A public vocational-education district will hammer out new ethical work rules for students after a cooking class was assigned to cater a Democratic fund-raiser at the home of a district trustee--at no pay. "When I heard about this, I thought, 'Uh-oh, we need to look at this,' " said Karin Freeman, president of the board of trustees for the North Orange County Regional Occupational Program. "We need to make sure we know what is appropriate and allowed under education law."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A public vocational education district in Orange County will write new ethical work rules for students after a cooking class was assigned to cater a Democratic fund-raiser at the home of a district trustee--with no pay. "When I heard about this, I thought, 'Uh-oh--we need to look at this,' " said Karin Freeman, president of the board of trustees for the North Orange County Regional Occupational Program. "We need to make sure we know what is appropriate and allowed under education law."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials with the North Orange County Community College District are considering plans to build an educational center in Anaheim, which could house more than a dozen classrooms and offer Anaheim its only venue for higher education. "We'd really love to do it, because Anaheim is underserved," said Donna Hatchett, a spokeswoman for the district. "But we still need to find a place for it. Ultimately, the nature of the center will be determined by the kind of building we find."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to decide which school official they should pick for their most prestigious professional award, delegates from 20 state regions of the Assn. of California School Administrators this week did something they've never done in 29 years of voting: They gave it to two people. Peter A. Hartman, superintendent of the Saddleback Unified School District, and James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Principal Ben Carpenter of Ball Junior High School was expecting to be happy about his school's score on the Academic Performance Index, the new state system for ranking and evaluating schools. After all, both Latinos and whites, the two statistically significant groups of students at the Anaheim school, had not only achieved the growth targets set for them by the state but also exceeded them. The school's Stanford 9 scores, on which the API is based, improved in all areas except reading.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | LEN HALL
After meeting behind closed doors for five hours, Irvine school officials refused to make an exception for a Woodbridge High School junior who has been banned from the cheerleading squad because she failed chemistry last semester, officials said Friday. Melissa Fontes, 16, who has been the co-captain of the varsity cheerleading squad for the past two years, will not be allowed to audition for next semester's squad with the rest of the cheerleading hopefuls April 23.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1992
The latest U.S. Census Bureau statistics suggest the 1980s in Orange County were both the best of times and the worst. Median household income rose dramatically, but the ranks of people below the poverty level ($12,674 annual income for a family of four) also swelled in some cities. Monthly homeowner costs--mortgage payment, taxes, association fees and other expenses--were up.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | TARIQ MALIK and ERIKA I. RITCHIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County students posted moderate increases in their SAT scores this year, and in at least one district they showed substantial gains over the previous year, the College Board reported Tuesday. In the Fullerton Joint Union High School District, which has six traditional high schools in Fullerton, La Habra and Buena Park, students earned an average total score of 1108--536 in verbal and 572 in mathematics--up 25 points from scores in the previous school year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the number of teachers leaving the beleaguered Orange school system rises, many are replaced with new hires who lack full teaching credentials, according to figures supplied by the district. And a disproportionate number of those instructors have landed in schools with largely poor and Latino enrollments. District officials acknowledge that rancor in their schools spurred many of the 241 resignations in the last school year, nearly a sixth of the teaching staff.
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