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Orange County Elections 1989

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Proponents of Measure M, the half-cent transportation sales tax defeated last November, raised a record-breaking $2,587,260 in their unsuccessful campaign, finance reports showed Monday. Citizens for Yes on M surpassed the previous record of $2,522,527 set by Citizens for Traffic Solutions, the group that successfully opposed a June, 1988, slow-growth and traffic initiative. Virtually the same major donors--builders, developers, real estate firms and construction companies--funded both efforts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Capistrano Unified School District improperly used public funds and failed to report expenditures in an effort to drum up support for a 1989 property-tax measure, but no criminal charges are warranted, the Orange County Grand Jury concluded in a report released Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The superintendent of the Capistrano Unified School District on Monday denied charges of a conspiracy to cover up use of district funds in a special election campaign last year and challenged the district attorney's office to bring the matter to trial. Supt. Jerome R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The battle lines have been drawn for what promises to be a hotly contested, multimillion-dollar fight over a plan to pay for $11.6 billion worth of transportation improvements with a half-cent increase in the county sales tax. Officials of the county registrar of voters office will decide today which of two position papers opposed to the plan will be placed on the Nov. 7 ballot. The plan, known as Measure M, seeks to increase the sales tax from 6% to 6.5%, raising a $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Frustrations over mounting school enrollment in south Orange County led to angry exchanges in a meeting this week between the city of San Clemente and the Capistrano Unified School District, the largest in the south county. Members of the San Clemente City Council and Planning Commission, who asked for Thursday's meeting, complained that the school district has not been keeping the city adequately informed about burgeoning school enrollment in the rapidly growing area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989 | JEFFREY PERLMAN
Seeking guidance on what to do this coming year now that voters have rejected a sales tax to fund transportation projects, Orange County transportation commissioners held a half-day retreat at an Irvine hotel Monday. The eight-member panel, demoralized by the defeat of Measure M on Nov. 7, watched videotapes showing a variety of people who talked about transportation options in the next few years, including opportunities for additional rail transit, said Stanley T.
NEWS
July 11, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Citing an unprecedented traffic crisis, the Orange County Transportation Commission voted Monday to place a countywide, half-cent sales tax for highway and transit projects on the Nov. 7 ballot. The tax would raise $3.1 billion for a far-reaching, $11.6-billion plan to speed traffic with wider freeways, additional car-pool lanes, streamlined streets and commuter rail service. About $8.4 billion for the 20-year plan would come from existing sources, such as the state and federal governments.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
On the eve of a crucial vote to place a proposed half-cent sales tax increase for transportation projects on the November ballot, The Times Orange County Poll shows local voters almost evenly divided, with support slipping. Asked how they would vote on a ballot measure to raise the local sales tax from 6% to 6 1/2%, 48% of the respondents said they would favor it, 46% opposed it and 6% were unsure.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
A measure that would link a countywide, half-cent sales tax for highways and transit projects to growth controls moved a step closer to the ballot Monday as a new, 20-year, $11.6-billion master plan for transportation improvements was unveiled by the Orange County Transportation Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Proponents of Measure M, the half-cent transportation sales tax defeated last November, raised a record-breaking $2,587,260 in their unsuccessful campaign, finance reports showed Monday. Citizens for Yes on M surpassed the previous record of $2,522,527 set by Citizens for Traffic Solutions, the group that successfully opposed a June, 1988, slow-growth and traffic initiative. Virtually the same major donors--builders, developers, real estate firms and construction companies--funded both efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Orange County transportation officials, overwhelmingly in favor of attempting another countywide half-cent transit and highway sales tax vote this November, are meeting today to take up the touchy issue of whether to modify or simply repeat Measure M, the sales tax plan defeated last fall. Measure M, which would have raised $3.1 billion for highway and transit projects over 20 years, was rejected by a vote of 52.6% to 47.4% after a $2.5-million-plus campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | JEFFREY PERLMAN
Despite the defeat of countywide slow-growth and traffic-improvement ballot measures, an influential group of local municipal officials announced a major effort Friday to create multi-city growth-management areas in which traffic and development decisions would be coordinated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989 | JEFFREY PERLMAN
Seeking guidance on what to do this coming year now that voters have rejected a sales tax to fund transportation projects, Orange County transportation commissioners held a half-day retreat at an Irvine hotel Monday. The eight-member panel, demoralized by the defeat of Measure M on Nov. 7, watched videotapes showing a variety of people who talked about transportation options in the next few years, including opportunities for additional rail transit, said Stanley T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1989
Voters in the Westminster School District rejected an additional property tax to pay for school improvements by almost a 3-to-1 margin, final figures released Wednesday revealed. According to school officials, the final totals in Tuesday's referendum, including absentee ballots, showed only 1,287 people, or just 26.5%, voting to approve the tax, and 3,572, or 73.5%, rejecting it. The tax would have cost a maximum of $100 per residential parcel in the school district and $200 for each business.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The sponsors of Measure M, who invested two years crafting their proposal and spent more than $2 million to sell it, said sadly Tuesday that their dream of a streamlined Orange County freeway system in this century is dead. "I think it will be a substantial setback for transportation in Orange County," said a glum Tom Rogers, a leader of the pro-M campaign, as no votes slowly overtook an early surge of yes votes. "There seems to be in this county a solid number of voters who resist taxes."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
North County versus South County is becoming a recurrent theme in Orange County politics, at least according to a city-by-city breakdown of last week's vote on Measure M. The half-cent transportation sales tax proposal was defeated countywide, 52.6% to 47.4%, in the Nov. 7 balloting. Using the Costa Mesa Freeway as a rough dividing line, Measure M was rejected overwhelmingly, 60.1% to 39.9% in the north. But the measure edged ahead in the south, 50.1% to 49.9%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Charging that Measure M was full of "boondoggles," opponents of the failed half-cent highway tax proposal on Monday demanded the resignation of the entire eight-member Orange County Transportation Commission. They also suggested that voters be asked to approve a new ballot measure that would earmark money mainly for added freeway lanes and no mass transit. "We need to get rid of OCTC and replace it with an elected board," said Lester P.
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