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Orange County Elections 1995

NEWS
March 29, 1995 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Given Orange County's long history of tilting at taxes, the half-cent increase that the Board of Supervisors continued to debate late into the wee hours Wednesday seems to face long odds. In a 1991 special election, the county's conservative voters roundly rejected a proposed half-cent increase in the sales tax to build a jail.
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NEWS
March 29, 1995 | MATT LAIT and RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Caught between conservative voter groups threatening their ouster and warnings of financial meltdown, Orange County supervisors continued public debate early today about a proposed half-cent sales tax increase aimed at helping the county recover from its $1.7 billion in bankruptcy losses. Speaking before an overflow crowd that greeted some of his comments with jeers or angry murmurs, county Chief Executive Officer William J.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | RENE LYNCH and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the eve of a decisive board vote over raising local sales taxes, Orange County supervisors on Monday searched for alternate ways to solve the county's bankruptcy woes and complained that school boards and city councils were withholding critically needed political support for the tax hike.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD and DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A proposal to put a half-cent sales tax increase on the June ballot is encountering early resistance in Orange County's political circles as three city councils immediately turned thumbs down on a request by county chief executive William J. Popejoy to embrace the measure. Only hours after county supervisors took the first giant step toward putting a tax hike up for a vote, Garden Grove's City Council went on record in unanimously opposing the proposed increase from 7.75% to 8.25%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1995 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblywoman Doris Allen (R-Cypress), a political moderate who claims a long history of involvement in education issues, announced Monday she is running for the state Senate from the 35th District. Allen, whose announcement wasn't a surprise, seeks to fill the seat vacated when former Republican state Sen. Marian Bergeson of Newport Beach won election to the Orange County Board of Supervisors. "This is an exciting time for people who believe in the Republican philosophy," Allen said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the experts and opinion polls are right, Orange County's bankruptcy stirred such unparalleled public fury that elected officials should be pondering futures outside government. But so far, that anger has generated little in the way of grass-roots political upheaval. Despite the county's reputation as a hotbed for recall activism, all four attempts to oust politicians involved in the financial crisis have failed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If hell hath no fury like a Republican scorned, then Doris Allen could be scorched Nov. 28. That's the day the embattled Cypress assemblywoman faces a recall election fostered by her brethren in the GOP, who have accused Allen of all manner of transgressions against the party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1995 | MATT LAIT
Fountain Valley Councilman George B. Scott and Westminster Mayor Charles V. Smith said Monday that they will run for Supervisor Roger R. Stanton's 1st District seat next year. Scott, 62, and Smith, 63, said they made their decision after Stanton declared last week that he would not seek reelection. "I was going to run anyway, but now that Roger isn't, there's no use waiting [to announce]," Scott said. "I might as well go for it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whether they're rehashing financial nightmares or public relations disasters, candidates for seats on the Orange Unified School District Board of Education are tossing around blame for the district's troubled history. Campaigns for the two contested seats on the seven-member board are building steam as the Nov. 7 election approaches. Voters have the power to dramatically alter the dynamics of the board, which frequently splits 4 to 3 on controversial issues.
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