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Orange County Environment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
Per the City Council's request, Mayor Steve Dicterow will write a letter to Caltrans asking that the agency use less herbicides in the county. The action came after Councilwoman Toni Iseman cited a recent Times report that showed Caltrans road crews used 14.5 gallons of liquid herbicides per mile in 1997 to control brush in the county--more than in any other county. Caltrans aims to reduce the use of herbicides by 2002, but the council suggested that the agency accelerate its reduction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
Per the City Council's request, Mayor Steve Dicterow will write a letter to Caltrans asking that the agency use less herbicides in the county. The action came after Councilwoman Toni Iseman cited a recent Times report that showed Caltrans road crews used 14.5 gallons of liquid herbicides per mile in 1997 to control brush in the county--more than in any other county. Caltrans aims to reduce the use of herbicides by 2002, but the council suggested that the agency accelerate its reduction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
Gov. Pete Wilson asked state lawmakers Wednesday to allocate $2 million to help restore Upper Newport Bay. "Upper Newport Bay, a valuable ecological and recreational resource, is in serious jeopardy due to sedimentation and erosion in the watershed," Wilson said in a prepared statement. "This funding will serve to restore important aquatic habitat and wetlands, improve water quality and increase the ability of boaters to navigate the bay."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's biggest private landowner and key government officials are considering a deal that would expand a landmark conservation plan to cover at least 60 more plants and animals, including many in environmentally sensitive wetlands. But some environmentalists fear that the plan, spearheaded by Irvine Co. and still in rough-draft form, would accelerate development in marshes, streams and pools--and they wonder if enough land would be set aside to compensate for the habitat lost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH
The vision of a 1,000-acre park at the mouth of the Santa Ana River will be explained at a public meeting tonight. Supporters of the proposed Orange Coast River Park say that it would preserve precious open land and allow restoration of wetlands and other fast-disappearing habitat. Plans call for linking a patchwork of public and private lands. The park would run from coastal wetlands inland to coastal bluffs, encompassing existing parks such as Fairview Park and Talbert Nature Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local officials are promising a more efficient process beginning Monday for companies seeking environmental permits in south Orange County. Operating the largest of four pilot programs in the state, the Orange County Permit Assistance Center will help businesses in South County save time and money, center director Danian Hopp said.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Driven by shore-bound winds, the slick from a 300,000-gallon oil spill reached miles of new beaches in Orange County on Friday, threatening major wildlife refuges and confounding cleanup crews working frantically to contain the disaster. The brown and black goo was reported washing ashore as far north as Sunset Beach, near the sensitive Bolsa Chica wetlands and a federal wildlife reserve at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's biggest private landowner and key government officials are considering a deal that would expand a landmark conservation plan to cover at least 60 more plants and animals, including many in environmentally sensitive wetlands. But some environmentalists fear that the plan, spearheaded by Irvine Co. and still in rough-draft form, would accelerate development in marshes, streams and pools--and they wonder if enough land would be set aside to compensate for the habitat lost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1986
The Orange County Transportation Commission's monthly newsletter (January, 1986) noted that Van Stephens was commended and honored for his work on the commission's policy and advisory committee. Doubtless he earned it. Too few citizens are recognized for their unselfish, no conflict-of-interest contributions to government projects. But Van Stephens is the Mission Viejo development firm's spokesman who vowed that unless the county supervisors approved the San Joaquin Freeway, his firm's 100,000-population tract next to Laguna Beach couldn't be built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1991
Orange County received more rainfall this last fiscal year (which ended June 30) than it had in the previous three years. The total is in large part attributable to the "March miracle," the month in which 6.86 inches of rain fell here, according to Orange County Environment Management Agency officials. Total rainfall recorded at the monitoring station in Santa Ana for the year was still below the historical average of 12.98 inches, however. Here's how the last five fiscal years compare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local officials are promising a more efficient process beginning Monday for companies seeking environmental permits in south Orange County. Operating the largest of four pilot programs in the state, the Orange County Permit Assistance Center will help businesses in South County save time and money, center director Danian Hopp said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH
The vision of a 1,000-acre park at the mouth of the Santa Ana River will be explained at a public meeting tonight. Supporters of the proposed Orange Coast River Park say that it would preserve precious open land and allow restoration of wetlands and other fast-disappearing habitat. Plans call for linking a patchwork of public and private lands. The park would run from coastal wetlands inland to coastal bluffs, encompassing existing parks such as Fairview Park and Talbert Nature Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
Gov. Pete Wilson asked state lawmakers Wednesday to allocate $2 million to help restore Upper Newport Bay. "Upper Newport Bay, a valuable ecological and recreational resource, is in serious jeopardy due to sedimentation and erosion in the watershed," Wilson said in a prepared statement. "This funding will serve to restore important aquatic habitat and wetlands, improve water quality and increase the ability of boaters to navigate the bay."
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Driven by shore-bound winds, the slick from a 300,000-gallon oil spill reached miles of new beaches in Orange County on Friday, threatening major wildlife refuges and confounding cleanup crews working frantically to contain the disaster. The brown and black goo was reported washing ashore as far north as Sunset Beach, near the sensitive Bolsa Chica wetlands and a federal wildlife reserve at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000 | Torus Tammer, 714) 965-7172, Ext. 15
The Orange County Water District's Groundwater Guardian Team and the Blue Planet Foundation are seeking applications from north-central Orange County students for an all-expenses-paid trip to the National Groundwater Foundation's 2000 Youth Summit on Environmental Health in Nebraska. Students interested in attending the Youth Summit will need to complete an application and answer two short questions about Orange County's environment.
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