Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOrange County Foreign Investments Japan
IN THE NEWS

Orange County Foreign Investments Japan

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese-owned companies in Orange County, stung by what they perceive as growing anti-Japanese sentiment among consumers as well as criticism from their own American workers, are joining efforts to rebuild their sagging image. Already coping with volatile issues of international trade during an election year, executives at many of the 160 Japanese companies in Orange County say they now face questions from their own employees about inflammatory comments made in Japan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japan that rarely said no to a U.S. real estate deal as little as two years ago lost its appetite in a big way in 1991, as new Japanese investment in U.S. properties plunged 61%, to the lowest level since 1985. The figures, released Thursday by the Los Angeles accounting firm Kenneth Leventhal & Co., dramatize the toll taken on Japanese real estate investors by higher interest rates in Japan, the sagging stock market there, tighter lending restrictions for Japan's banks and the moribund U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese-owned companies in Orange County, stung by what they perceive as growing anti-Japanese sentiment among consumers as well as criticism from their own American workers, are joining efforts to rebuild their sagging image. Already coping with volatile issues of international trade during an election year, executives at many of the 160 Japanese companies in Orange County say they now face questions from their own employees about inflammatory comments made in Japan.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japan that rarely said no to a U.S. real estate deal as little as two years ago lost its appetite in a big way in 1991, as new Japanese investment in U.S. properties plunged 61%, to the lowest level since 1985. The figures, released Thursday by the Los Angeles accounting firm Kenneth Leventhal & Co., dramatize the toll taken on Japanese real estate investors by higher interest rates in Japan, the sagging stock market there, tighter lending restrictions for Japan's banks and the moribund U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|