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Orange County Government Agencies Budget

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NEWS
February 23, 1995
The Legislature reconvenes its special session on the Orange County bankruptcy today, but lawmakers say don't anticipate many fireworks. On the Assembly side, leaders expect to form a special committee that will hear the bankruptcy bills. Republicans are pushing for the hearings to begin next week, but Democrats have yet to agree to a schedule. Officials continued Wednesday to refine the committee's mission.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than $207 million worth of new carpool lanes and $10 million for a death investigation training center were among those big-ticket Orange County items at stake in an evolving state budget Friday. After Senate approval of a $100-billion budget on Thursday, lobbyists and municipal officials throughout Orange County scrambled Friday to ensure that their pet projects would win the necessary approval in the Assembly and on the governor's desk.
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NEWS
December 24, 1994 | MARK PLATTE and JODI WILGOREN and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after announcing that hundreds of layoffs are likely from massive budget cutbacks, Orange County officials said Friday that they plan to slash an additional $80 million in costs next summer. News of more cutbacks came just 24 hours after top managers stunned the county's 18,000 employees by revealing more than $40 million in budget reductions and shifts planned over the next six months.
NEWS
February 23, 1995
The Legislature reconvenes its special session on the Orange County bankruptcy today, but lawmakers say don't anticipate many fireworks. On the Assembly side, leaders expect to form a special committee that will hear the bankruptcy bills. Republicans are pushing for the hearings to begin next week, but Democrats have yet to agree to a schedule. Officials continued Wednesday to refine the committee's mission.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | DAN WEIKEL and RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the dust from the first round of Orange County budget cuts began to settle Friday, local lawyers and judges questioned the fairness of letting Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi recommend enormous cuts in criminal defense services for the poor while sparing their own departments. Capizzi, Gates and Thomas E.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | TRACY WEBER and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After two weeks of using e-mail to squelch wild rumors of imminent disaster, Larry Leaman, the harried director of Orange County's Social Services agency, finally had some real news Friday: No one would be out on the street two days before Christmas. County Marshal Michael Carona told his staff the same day that they may be jostling for the remaining pens and Post-It notes, and the bottled water had to go--but none of them would have to.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County budget-cutting officials told union representatives Friday that they have identified some 2,050 employees eligible for retirement, saying that any anticipated layoffs could be significantly reduced if many of those older workers chose to retire by Jan. 10. At a lengthy meeting Friday evening, the county's management council also disclosed that it had originally wanted to cut the county's current budget by $70 million, but that they could devise only $40.2 million in reductions.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than $207 million worth of new carpool lanes and $10 million for a death investigation training center were among those big-ticket Orange County items at stake in an evolving state budget Friday. After Senate approval of a $100-billion budget on Thursday, lobbyists and municipal officials throughout Orange County scrambled Friday to ensure that their pet projects would win the necessary approval in the Assembly and on the governor's desk.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A wave of uncertainty, fear and anger swept through many county offices two days before Christmas as anxious employees wondered if they would have jobs to come back to after the holidays. As of late Friday, most of the 18,000 county employees did not know what to expect or how the dramatic budget cuts announced by the county the day before would affect them personally.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD and BERT EJERA and DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County officials have informed more than a dozen cities that $2.7 million in urban park grants they were promised this year will be suspended indefinitely because of the bankruptcy. The move places in jeopardy park improvement projects from Yorba Linda to Costa Mesa and was described Thursday by city officials as another sign of the magnitude of the financial crisis. "It's a disappointment, and it hurts," Brea Mayor Bev Perry said.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD and BERT EJERA and DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County officials have informed more than a dozen cities that $2.7 million in urban park grants they were promised this year will be suspended indefinitely because of the bankruptcy. The move places in jeopardy park improvement projects from Yorba Linda to Costa Mesa and was described Thursday by city officials as another sign of the magnitude of the financial crisis. "It's a disappointment, and it hurts," Brea Mayor Bev Perry said.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | MARK PLATTE and JODI WILGOREN and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after announcing that hundreds of layoffs are likely from massive budget cutbacks, Orange County officials said Friday that they plan to slash an additional $80 million in costs next summer. News of more cutbacks came just 24 hours after top managers stunned the county's 18,000 employees by revealing more than $40 million in budget reductions and shifts planned over the next six months.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | DAN WEIKEL and RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the dust from the first round of Orange County budget cuts began to settle Friday, local lawyers and judges questioned the fairness of letting Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi recommend enormous cuts in criminal defense services for the poor while sparing their own departments. Capizzi, Gates and Thomas E.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | TRACY WEBER and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After two weeks of using e-mail to squelch wild rumors of imminent disaster, Larry Leaman, the harried director of Orange County's Social Services agency, finally had some real news Friday: No one would be out on the street two days before Christmas. County Marshal Michael Carona told his staff the same day that they may be jostling for the remaining pens and Post-It notes, and the bottled water had to go--but none of them would have to.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County budget-cutting officials told union representatives Friday that they have identified some 2,050 employees eligible for retirement, saying that any anticipated layoffs could be significantly reduced if many of those older workers chose to retire by Jan. 10. At a lengthy meeting Friday evening, the county's management council also disclosed that it had originally wanted to cut the county's current budget by $70 million, but that they could devise only $40.2 million in reductions.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A wave of uncertainty, fear and anger swept through many county offices two days before Christmas as anxious employees wondered if they would have jobs to come back to after the holidays. As of late Friday, most of the 18,000 county employees did not know what to expect or how the dramatic budget cuts announced by the county the day before would affect them personally.
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