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Orange County Government Agencies Finances

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NEWS
December 16, 1994 | MARK PLATTE and MATT LAIT and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Securities and Exchange Commission has launched a broad investigation of possible influence peddling in the top reaches of Orange County government, looking specifically to determine whether brokers paid kickbacks to elected officials, a high-ranking source close to the investigation said Thursday. The probe has focused on "campaign contributions and kickbacks, things of that nature, and the relationship of broker-dealers to those officials," the source said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-debated move to turn buses into rolling billboards for movies, burger chains, shampoo and other commercial fare is paying huge dividends for the Orange County Transportation Authority, according to a new report. With the growing popularity of bus-side posters and adhesive wrap ads that encase whole coaches in colorful vinyl, transit officials are predicting the agency will generate $37 million in bus ad revenue over the next five years.
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NEWS
May 3, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON and SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County on Tuesday won Bankruptcy Court approval to disburse $5.7 billion to more than 200 cash-strapped cities, schools and government agencies, staving off a possibly devastating string of municipal defaults and bankruptcies. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge John E. Ryan approved the complex agreement during a five-hour hearing that overflowed from his courtroom into two nearby rooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to cash in on an increasingly cashless society, county toll road authorities are discussing ways of transforming their windshield toll transponders into rolling debit cards, good for the purchase of grub, gas, prescription drugs and more. Under the plan, the radio-signal gadgets that now smooth drivers' entry to the county's tollways could eventually be used at restaurants, gas stations, drugstores, dry cleaners and other drive-through businesses.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What has become crystal clear in the nation's largest municipal bankruptcy is that many investors in Orange County's ill-fated investment portfolio are going to lose money, lots of it. What is unclear is whose ox is going to be gored. Will the billions of dollars lost by departed Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron be divided evenly among those with money in the fund, or will some end up far down a pecking order, shouldering more of the financial loss than others?
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and MARIA LA GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There was a certain smugness about how Orange County went about the business of investing its money. But there always seemed to be good reason to crow. Then came the first of the terrible days. In the opening hours of the crisis, it all seemed like a confusing bad dream, with incomprehensible losses in a financial medium that was like Latin to a layman. Derivatives. Things that lost money as interest rates went up. It was all so unreal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | JEAN O. PASCO and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deciding who gets $12 million that inexplicably appeared in a county account has set Orange County supervisors, the county's executive officer and local government officials at loggerheads. Twice in the last 18 months, county supervisors have pondered behind closed doors what to do with nearly $30 million discovered in county accounts related to its historic 1994 bankruptcy. Money from two of the accounts, totaling $17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill by State Sen. Joe Dunn could mean millions of dollars to transportation districts in Orange County and three other counties that lost money in the state bailout during the recession of the early 1990s. The Orange County Transportation Authority would receive $3 million a year if the bill passes--money the state has used since 1993 to help pay for educational programs. The money would pay for 40,000 hours or 4% of the county's bus service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending nearly two years of deliberation and bitter debate, the Orange County Fire Authority's directors unanimously approved final adjustments Thursday to a funding plan that they said will help balance what cities pay with the level of fire services they receive. The equity-funding plan is to ensure that each of the authority's 19 cities pays a fair share for services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors gave Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs a choice Tuesday--either apply for state money that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals or face a pay cut. In a 4-1 vote, the supervisors gave Jacobs until Feb. 24 to seek the $6.8 million he has repeatedly shunned, even though they would give him the extra staff he has said he needs to relieve the jam. If Jacobs refuses, the board could decide at its next meeting to cut his $100,000-a-year salary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending nearly two years of deliberation and bitter debate, the Orange County Fire Authority's directors unanimously approved final adjustments Thursday to a funding plan that they said will help balance what cities pay with the level of fire services they receive. The equity-funding plan is to ensure that each of the authority's 19 cities pays a fair share for services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County toll road officials on Thursday unanimously approved a refinancing plan that could raise as much as $1.75 billion for the Foothill and Eastern toll roads, clearing the way for a sale of bonds as soon as Monday. The refinancing will extend the length of the bonds by five years to 2040 and should make it easier for the Transportation Corridor Agencies to meet debt service payments on the roads, saving the agencies at least $300 million over the next decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County may have overcharged builders by as much as $10 million in recent years, prompting the Board of Supervisors to vote Tuesday to cut inspection and planning fees and refund builders whose projects are not yet finished. Last year alone, the overbilling totaled nearly $2.4 million. It was discovered by a consultant hired to study whether the fees the county charged builders in the unincorporated areas were in line with a state code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | JEAN O. PASCO and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deciding who gets $12 million that inexplicably appeared in a county account has set Orange County supervisors, the county's executive officer and local government officials at loggerheads. Twice in the last 18 months, county supervisors have pondered behind closed doors what to do with nearly $30 million discovered in county accounts related to its historic 1994 bankruptcy. Money from two of the accounts, totaling $17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1999 | DAVID REYES and HARRISON SHEPPARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The cities that make up the Orange County Fire Authority have given themselves a difficult task as they try to find common ground over ways to fund the agency. Deeply divided on what to do, the authority and its 19 cities and the county have to decide in the next few months how to ensure that each city pays a fair share for services. So far, some of the cities that can't afford to pay their way fully don't like the plan the agency's consultant is recommending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill by State Sen. Joe Dunn could mean millions of dollars to transportation districts in Orange County and three other counties that lost money in the state bailout during the recession of the early 1990s. The Orange County Transportation Authority would receive $3 million a year if the bill passes--money the state has used since 1993 to help pay for educational programs. The money would pay for 40,000 hours or 4% of the county's bus service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996
Budget Woes Since fiscal year 1990- 91, county funding for the Human Relations Commission has been cut by two- thirds. Here's the trend: '95- '96: $106,015 Funding Fundamentals Last year, the Human Relations Council, which gives money to the commission, raised $198,000 for all its programs. How the council's money is raised: Private donations: 3% Corporate donations: 63% Fees from services: 12% Dues from cities: 22%* * Cities pay fee to support commission's work in their communities.
NEWS
February 23, 1995
The Legislature reconvenes its special session on the Orange County bankruptcy today, but lawmakers say don't anticipate many fireworks. On the Assembly side, leaders expect to form a special committee that will hear the bankruptcy bills. Republicans are pushing for the hearings to begin next week, but Democrats have yet to agree to a schedule. Officials continued Wednesday to refine the committee's mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1999 | HARRISON SHEPPARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Westminster City Council's vote to reject a study on revamping the county Fire Authority's funding was premature and places politics over public safety, officials from several other cities said Tuesday. "I think it's amazing . . . that Westminster's actually voting on what they think the Fire Authority's solution is when the Fire Authority hasn't even decided what the solution is," said Irvine City Councilman Mike Ward, who chairs the authority's board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Fire Authority is reviewing proposals to change its operations and to base services partly on a city's ability to pay, a move that could lead to closing a few stations. With 13 of 19 cities it covers unable to foot the bill for all the services they receive, the authority is looking at such details as where each paramedic, firefighter or engine company is based and whether all 60 fire stations are needed.
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