Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOrange County Government Employees
IN THE NEWS

Orange County Government Employees

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK
A new welfare office to serve poor and elderly residents in South County will open April 1 near La Paz Road and McIntyre Street. Financing the office became a priority in September after an attempt by county officials to close down the small welfare office in San Juan Capistrano caused a public outcry. Those opposing the closure said it would force the poor to make the long trip to the county welfare office in Costa Mesa. The San Juan Capistrano office was closed for less than a week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran legal advisor to the Orange County Board of Supervisors was named Tuesday to replace longtime County Counsel Laurence M. Watson, who is retiring. Benjamin de Mayo, who has worked in the county counsel's office 24 years and headed its litigation team, was the unanimous choice of the five-member board, which made the selection in a closed session. De Mayo, 51, will take over the staff of 98, including 61 attorneys, on Aug. 24.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 14, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Little-understood risks about deferred-compensation plans are being uncovered in the Orange County financial debacle. County employees were told last week that they will lose 10% of the $85 million they collectively had saved for retirement in the county-sponsored plan. Instead of paying promised benefits, the county will use a portion of the workers' savings to pay other creditors--essentially confiscating money that public employees had earned and saved. Is that legal?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his seventh-floor Fullerton office, William F. Gayk looks out over a wide swath of the county, a vast stretch of suburbia that he will help carve up in the name of politics and fair play. Gayk, who heads the Center for Demographic Research at Cal State Fullerton, has been selected as a consultant for the county's Redistricting Committee, which will give the 57-year-old analyst a major role in reshaping the county's power structure. There is a shade of irony in his selection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1994 | GEOFF BOUCHER
The Orange County government employees who led their peers during their record-breaking 1993 United Way Campaign were honored Wednesday for raising more than $839,500. Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder, who chaired the county's United Way effort, presented awards to dozens of agency leaders and employees for their fund-raising activities and donations, which combined to exceed the 1992 campaign total by more than $20,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a year when tight economic times have depressed charitable giving nationally, Orange County government workers dramatically stepped up their contributions to the United Way, giving a record $808,321 to the organization, county officials announced Friday. That money will help pay for charitable causes of all kinds, including child abuse services, substance abuse programs and local child care centers.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE
Dennis LaDucer, the former assistant Orange County sheriff accused of sexual harassment by several women, has been named in a lawsuit alleging sex discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 18 months, Raymond Ronald Mendez was a model employee for the Orange County public defender's office, an affable co-worker and crisp translator who interviewed Spanish-speaking defendants after their arrests. But the Santa Ana native has now been exposed as a man leading a second life--that of "Champ" Mendez, a player in the sprawling La Eme prison gang. He was convicted in May as a conspirator to murder and drug trafficking.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | DANIEL YI and RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Orange County deputy district attorney was charged with conspiracy Monday after federal authorities said he divulged information to a key suspect about the investigation of an alleged drug ring that made and distributed methamphetamine. Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County prosecutor who resigned in April amid allegations of illegal office gambling has been cleared of any wrongdoing by the state attorney general's office, his attorney said Thursday. Former Deputy Dist. Atty. Daryl Dworakowski will not face criminal charges in connection with an alleged gambling ring that a onetime co-worker claimed was being run out of a county office, according to his lawyer, Salvatore Ciulla. "This is the end of it as far as Daryl is concerned," Ciulla said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors agreed Tuesday to hire 23 new employees--nurses, analysts, and health educators--to determine how more than $14 million in tobacco settlement money will be distributed to hospitals, clinics and health programs. The decision to create the positions comes two weeks after the board voted to keep its promise to split $28.4 million in tobacco money between paying down the county's bankruptcy debt and health care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former computer network manager for the Hall of Administration has filed a $500,000 lawsuit against the county, claiming he was unfairly demoted and harassed because of his national origin. Huan Nguyen, who went from supervising five employees to none, said he was systematically discriminated against by three key county managers, including Assistant County Executive Officer Leo Crawford. Nguyen alleges that his supervisor directed a racial slur at him after a meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time Roy Parrino held his breath and was lowered into a dark, dank sewer line, he emerged with a two-carat topaz ring, which his wife wears to this day. But unexpected discoveries of jewelry are the only glamorous perks in Parrino's job as a sewage maintenance worker who helps care for the labyrinth of waste-laden pipes beneath Orange County. Otherwise, it's a thankless job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ready to approve a lease allowing Orange County to run the El Toro base, frustrated supervisors learned Tuesday that their staff had never conducted an environmental assessment of the property, making the county potentially liable for environmental damage. Without that examination, the county must rely on one supplied by the Navy, said Supervisor Todd Spitzer, who argued that the county would be unable to protect itself from future lawsuits by tenants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A clerk in the county's treasurer-tax collector's office has been convicted of grand theft after sheriff's investigators found a $60,000 agency check at his residence and evidence that he cashed two property tax checks for $400, officials announced Wednesday. Michael C. Barela, 31, of Santa Ana, who worked in the county office for two years, was fired on Jan. 19, a day after his conviction, Treasurer-Tax Collector John M.W. Moorlach said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top prosecutor at the Orange County district attorney's office, whose wife recently lost a discrimination lawsuit against the agency, abruptly resigned two weeks after being demoted, the office announced Tuesday. The resignation of Devallis Rutledge, 56, comes a month after his wife, fellow prosecutor Victoria Chen, lost a gender and race discrimination claim filed against the department. The legal action was filed during the tenure of the previous district attorney, Mike Capizzi. After Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A pit bull attacked an investigator for the Orange County district attorney's office Wednesday, sending the man to the hospital with serious injuries to his left hand, police said. Armando Acedo, who was investigating a case for the county's welfare fraud unit, had just entered the front yard of a Fullerton home when three dogs--two of them pit bulls--suddenly appeared, Fullerton Police Sgt. Kevin Hamilton said. At least one of the dogs attacked Acedo, prompting a fierce struggle, Hamilton said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public defenders and prosecutors sued the Orange County Retirement Board on Tuesday, saying its recent decision to raise pension benefits for county employees doesn't go far enough. The lawsuit filed in Orange County Superior Court by the county Attorney's Assn. seeks increased compensation for association members, including payments that are based on vacations and sick leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On New Year's Eve, Leo Crawford will have his beeper on, cell phone and car keys at the ready, and a bottle of aspirin at bedside. As Orange County's Y2K computer guru, Crawford has spent the last 24 months ensuring that he will grab the keys and not the aspirin. Maybe. "I'm optimistic," he said, "but I guarantee we will have missed something, some little thing that won't be life-threatening. But there's just too much to make an assumption that nothing's going to go wrong."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spending on travel for county employees rose 83% in the last two years and overtime costs nearly doubled since Orange County's historic bankruptcy in 1994, according to documents obtained this week under the California Public Records Act. The county's 15,000-person work force received $31.5 million in overtime during the fiscal year ending last month, compared to $26.8 million the year before and $17.3 million in 1995. Travel costs to conferences, government meetings and other events totaled $1.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|