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Orange County Government Employees Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
November 26, 1995 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The agencies overseeing California's first public toll roads have rewarded their executives with lofty salaries, cash bonuses and unusual perks--including a 2 1/2-month paid annual leave for one and a $190,000 home loan for another--over a six-year period in which Orange County slumped through a prolonged recession and declared bankruptcy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
About 1,000 welfare eligibility workers have ratified an offer from Orange County giving them a 9.5% raise for this year and a 17% increase over the contract's three-year life, the union's chief negotiator said. Weeks before the contract expired June 30, workers received an errant e-mail mistakenly sent from the chief of employee relations, Susan Paul, that derided the union.
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NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees who may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no public input, more than 80 of Orange County's top court managers received raises this year totaling nearly $500,000 under a new state system that gives judges authority to approve payroll and other expenditures. All but a handful of the 94 court administrators got salary boosts, which averaged 8%, or $5,500. One manager saw his pay rise from $90,000 to about $100,000, according to records released Friday at the request of The Times.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since Orange County officially emerged from bankruptcy last June, it has handed out sizable pay raises to 110 of the county's managers, according to records obtained by The Times under the California Public Records Act. Nearly 12% of all the county's management and supervisory staff have had their salaries hiked over the past seven months.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the tight economy of the past few years, public officials don't usually get raises by jumping from one government agency to another. Except in the case of Orange County's Transportation Corridor Agencies, where compensation per employee is among the highest of any comparably sized toll road agency. * Gregory G. Henk, the agencies' top engineer, was making $75,075 when he left Denver's toll road authority in early 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County's 1996-97 budget includes $25 million for employee salary increases, but the raises are the last ones workers are likely to see for several years. The money will go to make good on pay hikes approved before the county's 1994 bankruptcy, including an across-the-board 2.5% increase for the 14,000 union workers and merit pay boosts for hundreds of managers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overtime pay to county workers jumped in the just-ended budget year by more than 50% to the highest level since the 1994 bankruptcy, fueling concern that county government is relaxing its austerity policies. The county paid its 15,000 workers $26.6 million for overtime in the 1996-97 budget year, up from $17.3 million the year before, according to data obtained under the California Public Records Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990
County supervisors approved a 4.3% pay raise for all county court workers this week, bringing them into line with 15,000 other county workers. The raise covers about 900 court employees with a wide variety of salaries. Other county workers, most of whom are covered in a two-year contract, already had been scheduled to receive the 4.3% increase. "This is intended to track with our other employees," said Russ Patton, the county's personnel director. The pay hikes will be retroactive to last
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throughout the 1980s, while Orange County struggled to accommodate galloping growth in the face of increasingly tight government spending, the Sheriff's Department racked up huge bills for overtime, running a tab that could top $12 million this year, county records show. Some of the increase is beyond the department's control, but overtime spending has leaped by more than 750% in 10 years--up from $1.4 million in the 1980-81 fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to give itself and the county's top executives a 6% pay raise. Though that would be the second compensation boost in a year, officials pointed out that salaries were frozen in the wake of the county's 1994 bankruptcy. So the earlier increase was the first in nearly four years for all of the county's top management personnel. Supervisor William G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little public notice, Orange County supervisors approved hefty raises for themselves, most employees and county managers, including a $20,000 pay increase for Chief Executive Jan Mittermeier. Mittermeier's 14% pay hike over the next two years, approved on a 3-2 vote, eventually gives her $160,025 a year and puts her in a league with the top-paid chief executives in counties statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overtime pay to county workers jumped in the just-ended budget year by more than 50% to the highest level since the 1994 bankruptcy, fueling concern that county government is relaxing its austerity policies. The county paid its 15,000 workers $26.6 million for overtime in the 1996-97 budget year, up from $17.3 million the year before, according to data obtained under the California Public Records Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997 | BONNIE HAYES
A survey to see if pay at the Transportation Corridor Agencies is commensurate with pay at other organizations has been approved by Orange County tollway officials. Salary ranges at the tollway agency have not changed since 1992, when the last compensation survey was done. Officials said a new study, which will cost $24,000, is necessary because the agency is reorganizing positions to focus more on finance and operations and less on planning and construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1997 | BONNIE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The concept of bonuses for employees of Orange County's toll road authorities took a back seat Thursday to a broader study of how officials should be compensated. Orange County Transportation Corridor Agencies board members were asked Thursday to approve a $10,000 study that would have paid a consultant to rewrite a previously researched bonus plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | BONNIE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County tollway officials want to spend $24,000 on a salary survey to make sure paychecks at the agency are "comparable with peer positions in similar organizations," a proposal that is drawing criticism from a citizen watchdog group. "It's part of a periodic personnel checkup," said Lisa Telles, a spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies. "It does not mean instant raises or huge increases. It could mean we're right in line" with other public and private agencies, Telles said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors last week took $12.4 million that they do not yet have and used it to balance their proposed budget--a move that was as shrewd as it was risky. The money is expected to come from a reduction in the county's annual contribution to the retirement fund of its workers. Trouble is, the supervisors cannot trim the contributions without approval from the pension board, and that panel has not agreed to let the county off the hook.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheriff Brad Gates, who has been under pressure to reduce his spending, has fired off a letter to county supervisors, complaining about a report from the auditor-controller that estimates his department will be $800,000 in the red this fiscal year. Gates said his own calculations show that his department is only $100,000 over budget after making significant cuts in services.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since Orange County officially emerged from bankruptcy in June, it has handed out pay raises to 110 county managers, according to records obtained by The Times under the California Public Records Act. Nearly 12% of all the county's management and supervisory staff have had their salaries increased over the last seven months.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since Orange County officially emerged from bankruptcy last June, it has handed out sizable pay raises to 110 of the county's managers, according to records obtained by The Times under the California Public Records Act. Nearly 12% of all the county's management and supervisory staff have had their salaries hiked over the past seven months.
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