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Orange County Government Employees

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The continuing legal battle between Orange County supervisors and judges has jeopardized plans to add a second court to handle the growing number of child support cases. Court administrators said Thursday that they will not proceed with the planned addition because of staffing "constraints" imposed by the Board of Supervisors this week when it approved the new court.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials released a proposed budget Tuesday that for the first time since the 1994 bankruptcy calls for no cuts and begins to rebuild law enforcement and community services neglected during the last two years. The biggest beneficiaries of the improved county financial situation are the public protection agencies, including the Sheriff's Department, Probation Department, marshal's office, courts and the public defender's and district attorney's offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
The Board of Supervisors this week agreed to hire four employees for the county's new auditing unit and received a status report from David E. Sundstrom, the director of internal audits. The hires bring the total number of employees in the department to 17. Sundstrom said the added staffing will enable the unit to perform more audits more frequently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
Supervisor Jim Silva wants the county to develop a formal program to place volunteers in various departments and agencies in a move he says could save the county thousands of dollars. While individual county departments now use volunteers, Silva said there is no coordinator to match volunteers with assignments and no clearinghouse where people can call for information about donating their time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to add 87 workers to the Orange County district attorney's child support operation will not receive the endorsement of County Chief Executive Officer Jan Mittermeier when the Board of Supervisors considers the plan next week. Mittermeier's staff said Thursday that it didn't have adequate time to review the proposal, which Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi unveiled last week. "It caught us by surprise," County Chief Financial Officer Gary Burton said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As it struggles to recover from bankruptcy, the county government will need more money and more employees to handle the increasing needs for law enforcement, health and social services, according to detailed reports released Monday. The sobering conclusion comes from business plans that each of the county's departments and agencies has been developing over the last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 18 months of talking about scaling back the size of government and handing over some of its functions to the private sector, the Board of Supervisors weighed a proposal Tuesday that amounted to "privatization" in reverse. The county staff had recommended that the supervisors award a $1.6-million contract for a job training program to a group of county employees who submitted a lower bid than an outside firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD
The Board of Supervisors this week agreed to extend through July 1998 the contracts of two employee associations. The Orange County Law Enforcement Managers Assn. represents captains and lieutenants in the Sheriff's Department, and the Orange County Attorneys Assn. represents county lawyers and prosecutors. The two bargaining groups have a total of about 420 members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD
County officials said Thursday that they are considering a request by some managers to reinstitute a merit raise system that was frozen following the county's 1994 bankruptcy. The move comes two months after the county announced that it would spend more than $20 million to give its 14,000 union workers retroactive cost-of-living and merit pay raises that were delayed because of the financial crisis. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a bid to boost bankruptcy recovery efforts, the county is expected within the next month to seek a reduction in the amount of money it contributes to the employee retirement system. The issue was discussed Monday by the Orange County Retirement Board, which received a report by an actuarial consultant who analyzed how a reduced contribution from the county would affect the $2.9-billion retirement fund.
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