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Orange County Government Officials Wages And Salaries

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors gave Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs a choice Tuesday--either apply for state money that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals or face a pay cut. In a 4-1 vote, the supervisors gave Jacobs until Feb. 24 to seek the $6.8 million he has repeatedly shunned, even though they would give him the extra staff he has said he needs to relieve the jam. If Jacobs refuses, the board could decide at its next meeting to cut his $100,000-a-year salary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without opposition or fanfare, county supervisors unanimously helped themselves Tuesday to a $10,200-a-year salary boost--a 10.4% hike--based on a recommendation by an outside blue ribbon panel. The new salary takes the five supervisors from $97,800 to $108,000 a year, starting Feb. 1. Supervisors gave themselves a slightly larger 11% salary bump in 1998, a raise that was spread over two years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | SHELBY GRAD
The Board of Supervisors will decide next week whether to reduce the salary of Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs for refusing to participate in a state program that could provide millions of dollars in additional resources to his office. Supervisors Charles V. Smith and William G. Steiner have said the threat of a salary cut might be the only way to convince Jacobs to cooperate. Jacobs could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With only one lone public dissenter, Orange County supervisors approved sweeping pay raises Tuesday for as many as 4,200 employees, including hefty increases of up to 19% for nearly two dozen top elected and appointed officials. The new pay levels received unanimous approval from the five supervisors, who will get a modest $5,600 jump in salary, to $97,822 a year. The raises will cost an additional $4.5 million a year. The amount was included within the county's $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could prompt Jan Mittermeier to quit as Orange County's chief executive, the Board of Supervisors took the unusual step Wednesday of making a contract offer public--an offer that reduces her authority and changes her title. Supervisor William G.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite post-bankruptcy pledges that they would slash their own pay by 5%, Supervisors Gaddi H. Vasquez and Roger R. Stanton have not been in any hurry to reduce their salary and benefit costs to the county. Neither Vasquez nor Stanton, nor any other member of the Orange County Board of Supervisors, has taken steps to have his or her annual base pay permanently reduced from $82,056. So far Supervisors Marian Bergeson and Jim Silva have refused to accept county cars.
NEWS
February 25, 1995
To the relief of nervous bondholders, Moody's Investors Service said Friday that six agencies that invested in the county investment pool probably will be able to meet their March debt service payments. Moody's made its evaluation after reviewing documents and having discussions with officials from Huntington Beach, Buena Park, the Fullerton Library Building Authority, the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District, the Yorba Linda Public Finance Authority and the Yorba Linda Co.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | GREG HERNANDEZ and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
County Supervisor William G. Steiner on Friday pledged to cut his own $82,500 annual salary by 10%, as he and his board colleagues submitted plans to reduce their office budgets to Chief Executive Officer William J. Popejoy. Although county budget officials had asked the supervisors to trim their budgets to $387,000 each, only Board Chairman Gaddi H. Vasquez and Supervisor Roger R. Stanton achieved that goal. The three other supervisors said their cuts will bring their budgets below $400,000.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | JEFF BRAZIL and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After considerable hand-wringing over how to share the burden of Orange County's financial crisis, Supervisors Gaddi H. Vasquez and Roger R. Stanton pledged Wednesday to voluntarily slash their $82,000-a-year salaries by 5%. But even if all five supervisors did the same thing, it would only make a $20,500 dent in the county's $2-billion shortfall, and critics described the pair's action as too little, too late from too few.
NEWS
December 22, 1994
Some of the perks and benefits that go along with being an Orange County supervisor, administrative officer or auditor: Annual Salaries * Chief administrative officer: $140,941 * Auditor: $104,582 * Board members: $82,056 Other Benefits * Car allowance: If hired or elected before March 15, 1993, monthly allowance is $715 or a county leased, insured car. If hired or elected after, monthly allowance is $465 or a county leased, insured car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's top government officials--including the district attorney, sheriff and treasurer--would get double-digit pay increases under a proposal to be considered Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. Officials maintain that the increases, which cover 4,200 employees and are as much as 19%, are needed to make the county more attractive for high-level managers and other workers, said Jan Walden, assistant chief executive officer for human resources. The cost is $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2000
Orange County's top government officials, including the district attorney, sheriff and treasurer, would get pay increases of as much as 19% under a proposal to be considered Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. Officials maintain that the increases, which cover 4,200 employees, are needed to make the county more attractive for high-level managers and other workers, said Jan Walden, assistant chief executive officer for human resources. The cost is $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little fanfare, Orange County supervisors made it official Tuesday, giving final approval to a 6% pay raise for themselves. The raise, effective in 60 days, was approved, 4 to 1, with no discussion. Supervisor Todd Spitzer dissented. The higher compensation for themselves and top county officials follows salary increases last year of 12% for the supervisors and 14% for County Executive Officer Jan Mittermeier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could prompt Jan Mittermeier to quit as Orange County's chief executive, the Board of Supervisors took the unusual step Wednesday of making a contract offer public--an offer that reduces her authority and changes her title. Supervisor William G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little public notice, Orange County supervisors approved hefty raises for themselves, most employees and county managers, including a $20,000 pay increase for Chief Executive Jan Mittermeier. Mittermeier's 14% pay hike over the next two years, approved on a 3-2 vote, eventually gives her $160,025 a year and puts her in a league with the top-paid chief executives in counties statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some candidates hoping to replace Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs are unhappy over a recent letter sent by the county's top lawyer reminding them that the Board of Supervisors is now free to cut the assessor's salary. The seven candidates for the office each received a certified letter from County Counsel Laurence M. Watson in recent days informing them that, based on the board's action in February, the assessor's salary can be cut based on job performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1994 | SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously approved the first pay raises in three years for department heads, including Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi. * The raises reflect the county's improving fiscal picture, County Administrative Officer Ernie Schneider has said. The raises range from 2.5% to 4%, based on job performance reviews recently completed by Schneider and the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sensing a lack of support from fellow supervisors, Board Chairman Thomas F. Riley on Tuesday backed off earlier statements and said he will not ask his colleagues to consider giving themselves a pay raise. "I feel it is warranted, and I would have to assume that others feel they deserve it too, but I'm not going to do it unless there is absolute unanimity, and it doesn't appear there is," said Riley, who is retiring in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to make it possible to cut Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs' pay for refusing to apply for state loans that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals. Saying that chipping at the assessor's $100,000-a-year salary is the only way to convince Jacobs to cooperate in seeking the loans, the board voted 3 to 2 to consider adjusting Jacobs' pay on an annual basis beginning in January 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors gave Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs a choice Tuesday--either apply for state money that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals or face a pay cut. In a 4-1 vote, the supervisors gave Jacobs until Feb. 24 to seek the $6.8 million he has repeatedly shunned, even though they would give him the extra staff he has said he needs to relieve the jam. If Jacobs refuses, the board could decide at its next meeting to cut his $100,000-a-year salary.
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