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Orange County Health Care Agency

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | Sean Kirwan, (949) 574-4202
The Orange County Health Care Agency has scheduled a free children's immunization clinic from 2 to 5 p.m. Monday at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 305223 Via Con Dios. A parent or guardian must be present. Immunizations records must be provided. Information: (949) 589-7870.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2007 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
A grand jury has concluded that a 31-year-old La Habra woman who died in June in the Orange County jail system's infirmary might have survived her heart attack if nurses had been properly trained in basic emergency techniques. The nurses' first response after Vicki Avila's collapse was to find a paper towel to wipe blood from her nose.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | Claudia Figueroa, (949) 574-4268
The Orange County Health Care Agency will sponsor an immunization fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Rea 5th and 6th Grade Center, 601 Hamilton St. The shots are free and no appointment is necessary. A parent or guardian must be present and bring the child's immunization records. Information: (949) 574-6595.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2005 | Mai Tran and Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writers
Hoping to resolve a long-standing culture clash between health inspectors and Little Saigon restaurants, the Orange County Health Care Agency has eased temperature restrictions on Vietnamese dishes such as spring rolls, rice cakes and pork-stuffed buns. Restaurants will be allowed to keep certain foods at room temperature for up to four hours as long as they label products with expiration dates and throw them out when they expire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2000 | Eric C Sanitate, (949) 248-2152
Another round of rainfall expected to hit the area this weekend coupled with a sewage spill in Laguna Beach leaves the status of local beaches unclear as the Presidents Day weekend approaches. On Thursday, Orange County Health Care Agency officials closed Aliso Beach from 1,000 feet up coast and down coast from Aliso Creek when a blocked line at the nearby Aliso Water Management Agency treatment plant spilled 500 gallons of sewage into the creek, agency spokeswoman Monica Mazur said.
NEWS
November 12, 1988
Year Total Deaths Before to 1983 3 2 1983 14 14 1984 70 58 1985 96 83 1986 156 118 1987 266 147 January 1988 22 13 February 14 6 March 34 10 April 29 11 May 34 7 June 27 9 July 18 5 August 20 3 September 29 4 1988 to date 227 68 TOTAL 832 490 * As of Sept. 30, 1988, latest available information. Source: Orange County Health Care Agency
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | Eric C. Sanitate, (949) 248-2152
A spill caused by a blocked sewage line at a city sewage collection facility has shut down a large portion of Poche beach, where Camino Capistrano and Pacific Coast Highway meet, an Orange County Health Care Agency spokeswoman said. Health care officials closed the beach Thursday when a large potted plant created a blockage at the sewage facility, spewing about 3,000 gallons of untreated waste water into the ocean, said Monica Mazur, spokeswoman for the health care agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
More than 800 people who now receive indigent medical care from the county would become ineligible for the program under tightened eligibility rules proposed by the Orange County Health Care Agency. The stricter rules, which the Board of Supervisors will consider next week, are required under the terms of federal welfare reform and would affect about 3% of the 28,000 people who receive the health-care benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000 | Mathis Winkler, (949) 574-4232
The city has paid $2,500 to the Orange County Health Care Agency to settle a dispute over installing an underground fuel tank before it had been inspected. "We got ahead of ourselves," said Dave Niederhaus, the city's general services director, "We should have waited until we had the permits in hand." Niederhaus added that the tank had not posed a health threat at any time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
The state has given the Orange County Health Care Agency an additional 22,000 doses of flu vaccine, some of which will be distributed at eight free flu clinics this month. The remainder will be given to skilled-nursing facilities, long-term-care facilities and community clinics. This will give the county agency a total of 46,760 doses this year, compared with 58,000 last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County's retired director of health services will continue his work as a management consultant for the Orange County Health Care Agency next year despite questions raised Tuesday about his pay. Robert C. Gates, who retired from his Los Angeles County post in 1995, will be paid about $144,000 by Orange County, which also will pay his unemployment insurance, Social Security and workers' compensation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
The state has given the Orange County Health Care Agency an additional 22,000 doses of flu vaccine, some of which will be distributed at eight free flu clinics this month. The remainder will be given to skilled-nursing facilities, long-term-care facilities and community clinics. This will give the county agency a total of 46,760 doses this year, compared with 58,000 last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2004 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
Just weeks after documenting the state's first death from West Nile virus, the Orange County Health Care Agency has added the disease to its list of reportable conditions, officials said Friday. "The aim is to increase the information we have about the cases that occur," said Howard Sutter, an agency spokesman. "As additional cases are reported, we want to see where they are occurring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2003
It's going to cost a little more to own a dog in Orange County following a series of animal control fee increases approved Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. The board authorized the county Health Care Agency to increase the annual dog license fees from $15 to $18 for neutered or spayed dogs, a 20% increase, and from $49 to $62 for dogs that have not been fixed, a 27% hike. The county provides animal control services in 22 cities and issues about 140,000 dog licenses a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
As Orange County supervisors try to balance a budget with $130 million less than this year's, health officials plan to severely cut mental health services, close eight part-time clinics and reduce staff for sexually transmitted disease testing. Although the Board of Supervisors increased the county Health Care Agency's budget 5% for the fiscal year beginning July 1, department officials say higher care costs mean they would have to get $23 million more to keep services at current levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of leadership shifts and vacancies, Orange County's Health Care Agency has a new permanent administrator. Julie A. Poulson, a registered nurse who rose through the ranks to various administrative jobs, was chosen Tuesday to lead the agency, which with a $361-million annual budget and more than 2,400 employees is one of the county's largest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several agonizing delays, the Orange County Health Care Agency is finally receiving the rest of its state-issued flu vaccine and is resuming free clinics for the elderly and other frail residents turned away during a shortage. "Our clinics are open. We're just going to use [the vaccine] up until it's all gone," said Mary Wright, immunization coordinator for the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000 | Mathis Winkler, (949) 574-4232
The city has paid $2,500 to the Orange County Health Care Agency to settle a dispute over installing an underground fuel tank before it had been inspected. "We got ahead of ourselves," said Dave Niederhaus, the city's general services director, "We should have waited until we had the permits in hand." Niederhaus added that the tank had not posed a health threat at any time.
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