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Orange County History

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's easy to miss the Earth-N-Ware shop in Orange. Coming west from Shaffer Street, there's a large strip mall, fancy Indian restaurant and Pep Boys store. Then the tiny red farmhouse comes into view. "They call it the old red barn," Jerry Newton says of the rickety wooden building housing his unusual business, a smoke and pottery shop that operates under the slogan "Our Cigarettes Really Are Cheaper."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, James Irvine stood on his property--maybe on the front porch of his mansion, on what is now the corner of Irvine Boulevard and Jamboree Road--and surveyed the thousands of open acres around him. He had an unobstructed, horseshoe-shaped view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana mountains, of the Tustin hills that are now called Lemon Heights, of the San Joaquin hills that stretch toward Laguna Beach. Irvine Ranch, his land was called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, James Irvine stood on his property--maybe on the front porch of his mansion, on what is now the corner of Irvine Boulevard and Jamboree Road--and surveyed the thousands of open acres around him. He had an unobstructed, horseshoe-shaped view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana mountains, of the Tustin hills that are now called Lemon Heights, of the San Joaquin Hills that stretch toward Laguna Beach. Irvine Ranch, his land was called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cluster of dank, dusty rooms in the basement of the old courthouse in Santa Ana sits Orange County history. There, some of the county's earliest documents are bound in oversized ledgers, filed away in acid-free boxes and folders and tucked in drawers. The county once had an archivist, as well as an assistant, to sort through and preserve the historic documents and help the public in using them.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | JERRY HICKS
Adieu, El Toro. We won't forget. I felt its importance each time I drove through its front gate and past the deep green ficus, a radiant arbor row that eventually gave way to winding roads lined with scores of drab brown buildings. Working centers, where assignment and duty outweighed attention to decor. Born of war before midcentury, El Toro Marine Corps Air Station always was bustling with labor of consequence. Most of us came to Orange County in search of sun and sand.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | JANET WILSON
The legends of El Toro are as numerous and high-flying as the planes that took off from the base. Once, in the late '80s, a young corporal assigned to simulated flight training couldn't resist. He jumped into a jet and went for a joy ride. Or so the story goes. "He'd never flown a real plane in his life," said Tom O'Hara, a Marine veteran and the base museum curator. "He flew it around a couple of times, and landed perfectly. They bounced him out of the Marines. Corporals don't fly."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Macko painstakingly gathered tule reeds by the hundreds, pulling them out of mud in the San Joaquin freshwater marsh in Irvine. He dried and stored them. Then he bundled them together and tied the bundles to create a boat the likes of which California has not seen for hundreds of years. Then he presented it as a gift to Orange County's Juaneno Band of Mission Indians--transporting it in a thoroughly 1990s kind of way. "This is a fantastic gift," said David Belardes, Juaneno tribal chief.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Martin L. Osborn died, there was no one left to call. The file at the old soldiers' home listed a daughter as next of kin but included no street address. And Osborn's wife of more than 50 years was already dead and buried in a Santa Ana cemetery. So after cancer and pneumonia overwhelmed Osborn in 1929, at age 84, it was left to a Santa Ana veterans group to bury the Civil War veteran beside his wife in an unmarked grave. Unmarked, that is, until now.
NEWS
April 26, 1999 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a tale of the Orange County that once was a place where people came for space and freedom and discovered the world was rushing in right behind them. It is also about love, loss, and, above all, Jeanne Porter and her late husband, Sam. They, or rather Jeanne, represents the last of a kind: Possessor of one of the few privately owned ranches left in south Orange County. When they moved there 22 years ago, the Porters could see one light in the distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Black History Parade goes marching through the streets of Santa Ana on Saturday, Bobby McDonald will be there, walking proudly among the local dignitaries, drill teams and drum majors. "I'm proud to be in this parade because the theme is unity in the community. The whole premise is to bring all cultures together," said McDonald, president of the Black Chamber of Commerce of Orange County in Santa Ana.
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