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Orange County History

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County has spent more than $12 million over the last six years to settle lawsuits using an unusual system that bypasses any review or scrutiny from the elected Board of Supervisors. Unlike all other urban counties in California, Orange County makes these payments without public notice or approval from the supervisors. Rather, the out of court settlements are ratified by a special committee made up of county officials.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | MARC BALLON, Marc Ballon covers small business and entrepreneurial issues for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7439 and at marc.ballon@latimes.com
Orange County is getting its own yearbook. "Orange County at the Year 2000," which will contain photos of local business and civic leaders and histories of their organizations, is slated to appear next year. The Orange County Public Library will house the finished album, and CD-ROM versions will go to local schools, museums and libraries. About 2,000 businesses and organizations are expected to participate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's easy to miss the Earth-N-Ware shop in Orange. Coming west from Shaffer Street, there's a large strip mall, fancy Indian restaurant and Pep Boys store. Then the tiny red farmhouse comes into view. "They call it the old red barn," Jerry Newton says of the rickety wooden building housing his unusual business, a smoke and pottery shop that operates under the slogan "Our Cigarettes Really Are Cheaper."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, James Irvine stood on his property--maybe on the front porch of his mansion, on what is now the corner of Irvine Boulevard and Jamboree Road--and surveyed the thousands of open acres around him. He had an unobstructed, horseshoe-shaped view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana mountains, of the Tustin hills that are now called Lemon Heights, of the San Joaquin hills that stretch toward Laguna Beach. Irvine Ranch, his land was called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, James Irvine stood on his property--maybe on the front porch of his mansion, on what is now the corner of Irvine Boulevard and Jamboree Road--and surveyed the thousands of open acres around him. He had an unobstructed, horseshoe-shaped view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana mountains, of the Tustin hills that are now called Lemon Heights, of the San Joaquin Hills that stretch toward Laguna Beach. Irvine Ranch, his land was called.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cluster of dank, dusty rooms in the basement of the old courthouse in Santa Ana sits Orange County history. There, some of the county's earliest documents are bound in oversized ledgers, filed away in acid-free boxes and folders and tucked in drawers. The county once had an archivist, as well as an assistant, to sort through and preserve the historic documents and help the public in using them.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | JERRY HICKS
Adieu, El Toro. We won't forget. I felt its importance each time I drove through its front gate and past the deep green ficus, a radiant arbor row that eventually gave way to winding roads lined with scores of drab brown buildings. Working centers, where assignment and duty outweighed attention to decor. Born of war before midcentury, El Toro Marine Corps Air Station always was bustling with labor of consequence. Most of us came to Orange County in search of sun and sand.
NEWS
June 30, 1999
Before it was a base--or a freeway intersection--El Toro was a town. The land was originally held by Don Jose Serrano, who in the 1800s was granted 10,000 acres in the area by the Mexican government. It was known as Rancho Canada de los Alisos. But legend has it that it was nicknamed El Toro after a prized, white-faced bull that survived being trapped at the bottom of a well. A lack of rain and water shortages forced the Serranos into debt, and in the latter part of the 1800s the ranch was sold.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | JANET WILSON
The legends of El Toro are as numerous and high-flying as the planes that took off from the base. Once, in the late '80s, a young corporal assigned to simulated flight training couldn't resist. He jumped into a jet and went for a joy ride. Or so the story goes. "He'd never flown a real plane in his life," said Tom O'Hara, a Marine veteran and the base museum curator. "He flew it around a couple of times, and landed perfectly. They bounced him out of the Marines. Corporals don't fly."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Macko painstakingly gathered tule reeds by the hundreds, pulling them out of mud in the San Joaquin freshwater marsh in Irvine. He dried and stored them. Then he bundled them together and tied the bundles to create a boat the likes of which California has not seen for hundreds of years. Then he presented it as a gift to Orange County's Juaneno Band of Mission Indians--transporting it in a thoroughly 1990s kind of way. "This is a fantastic gift," said David Belardes, Juaneno tribal chief.
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