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Orange County Human Relations Commission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992 | ROSE KIM and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Rose Hernandez Espinoza left the working-class La Habra neighborhood 11 years ago where she had spent her life, she dreamed about returning someday to help. She fulfilled her wish in 1990, when she returned to the old neighborhood with her husband and child, and began offering a free tutoring service in her garage for local children. "After talking with a lot of my neighbors, I realized that a lot of them weren't helping their kids with their homework," she said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The number of reported hate crimes in Orange County fell by 21% last year, even though such crimes based on sexual orientation almost doubled, according to a report released Thursday. The Orange County Human Relations Commission found that 61 hate crimes were reported to authorities in 2012, continuing a general downward trend since reported hate crimes peaked at 101 in 2006. The most frequent target, the commission said, were blacks and people perceived to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 120 hate-related incidents were recorded by Orange County law enforcement agencies in 1991, a dramatic jump over previous years and a trend that is likely to grow worse, according to some community leaders. A report released Friday by the Orange County Human Relations Commission shows that an average of 10 incidents were recorded each month, with most occurring in January and apparently spurred by animosities stemming from the Persian Gulf War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2012 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
The organization that tracks hate crimes and racial intolerance in Orange County is at risk of having its county funding gutted, a money-saving move that some say could unravel 41 years of hard work in a county that has grown increasingly diverse. A county supervisor is proposing a two-thirds reduction in the money given to the Orange County Human Relations Commission, which leaders say could cripple the group's effectiveness in handling potentially volatile situations. It was the commission, supporters say, that stepped in to calm an angry city when a homeless man died after a violent confrontation with police at a downtown Fullerton transit center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County community organizer who has worked extensively for immigrant rights and has won praise for a report about the exploitation of day laborers has been selected to head one of the county's largest private charities. Barbara Considine, 33, a staff member with the Orange County Human Relations Commission for four years, was named executive director of the 20-year-old charity Share Our Selves by its board of directors late Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are a few kinds of people for whom the Rev. John McReynolds has no sympathy: those who close their minds to the gift of diversity, those who fail to see the promise in all of us and youngsters who speak of what they can't do instead of what is possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988
"Minority Business Opportunities '88" is the subject of a seminar Saturday in Anaheim that will focus on financing, special government programs and networking. The program is sponsored by the Orange County Minority Business Council and U.S. Small Business Administration along with the Orange County Human Relations Commission, the Black Business Alliance, and the Hispanic, Vietnamese and Korean chambers of commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000 | Chris Ceballos, (714) 966-7440
The Orange County Human Relations Commission will hold an introduction to mediation training on March 2. The commission trains mediators to act as neutral third parties and to assist in dispute resolution. Free training is available to bilingual (Spanish/English) speakers willing to volunteer 120 hours over a six-month period. The seminar begins at 6 p.m., conference room A/B, 1300 S. Grand Ave. building B. Information: (714) 567-7470.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | Andre Briscoe, (714) 966-5848
Mayor Alta E. Duke and Councilman Paul F. Walker presented former Councilwoman and Mayor Charlene Hatakeyama-Lim with a plaque during last week's council meeting. The plaque was in recognition of Hatakeyama-Lim's receiving an Orange County Human Relations Commission award for her work in establishing Youth 20/20. More than 150 volunteers have worked with the community-based organization since it began in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2006 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Although fewer hate crimes were reported in Orange County last year than in 2004, Latinos surprisingly suffered an increase, according to a county Human Relations Commission report released Thursday. One reason may be the public debate over immigration spilling onto the streets, said Rusty Kennedy, the commission's executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2005 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Don't tell Dagoberto Zavala about man's best friend. Those tail-wagging pooches that offer glad-to-see-you greetings at the front door are no friends of his . His displeasure has even gained the attention of the Orange County Human Relations Commission. Zavala says dog waste has fouled his life and that of his family since they moved three years ago into their upper-middle-class home in Rancho Santa Margarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2005 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A little-known public agency assigned to help foster racial and ethnic harmony in increasingly diverse Orange County now finds itself under attack by officials who question its effectiveness and its need for public funds. At issue is the Orange County Human Relations Commission, set up in 1971 with a tiny staff to fight intolerance and discrimination. Today, with public and private money, the commission and its nonprofit have a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2005 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Complaints of harassment and bigotry against gays and lesbians in Orange County rose in 2004, continuing a trend that began in 2000, according to a report released Thursday by the county's Human Relations Commission. The agency said there were 152 alleged hate crimes and non-prosecutable "incidents" last year targeting all groups, compared with 128 in 2003. African Americans and Jews are most often the targets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2003 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
Bracing for deep state budget cuts, a panel of Orange County officials has reportedly recommended eliminating the Human Relations Commission, which tracks hate crimes, mediates disputes in schools and neighborhoods and sponsors talks among diverse ethnic groups. The commission has a $437,000 budget that pays the salaries of an executive director, deputy director and a community relations director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2002 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The irony is not lost on Ra'id Faraj. Half a world away, in his native town of Bethlehem, his family is cowering under the advance of Israeli tanks in a perennial conflict that has escalated recently in a vicious cycle of suicide bombings and retaliations. Here in Orange County, Faraj, a spokesman for the Southern California chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, will be honored Sunday for seeking peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001
In the month following the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, the Orange County Human Relations Commission received 24 reports of hate-related incidents involving people perceived to be from the Middle East. The commission says it had never before recorded that many cases toward that community. Given the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 and the patriotic reaction to them, some residents might conclude that the high incidence is understandable. It's not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One office in Orange County is uniquely qualified to deal with any racially motivated backlash from last week's terrorist attacks on the East Coast: the Orange County Human Relations Commission. For three decades, the commission has worked to eliminate prejudice, intolerance and discrimination with mediation, education and dialogue. After the attacks, commission members immediately dispatched to county schools a curriculum that could be used to help explain the violence to students.
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