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Orange County Land

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NEWS
February 25, 1988
There are slightly more than a half-million acres of land in Orange County. Changes in land use during an 8-year period from 1972 to 1980 reflect the following trends: Residential land use has increased nearly 23%, while commercial use has nearly doubled, with a 47% increase. Industrial use of land has increased 44%, the same proportion that agricultural use has declined. Despite the continued development of Orange County land, open recreational space increased more than 17%.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2003 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
It was business as usual as an Orange County land-use commission recently turned down plans for an Irvine housing tract, saying it would be too close to an airport. Some of the houses, commissioners reasoned, could end up so close to the runways that they would be in a potential crash zone. And the noise of jets overhead made the area unsuitable for homes. There is only one problem: The airport doesn't exist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2002
REAL ESTATE
August 23, 1987 | Dick Turpin
It's easy for me to say. Two decades ago, when I embarked on this job, Orange County was pretty much one big orange grove on the way to San Diego. The development binge was under way as landowners, farmers and ranchers began receiving offers they couldn't ignore. Their land was destined for an epic change at prices--by that era's standards--they had never imagined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Troy Thomas rummaged through an old bunkhouse, trying to figure out what links to the past he could take. Three generations of his family had lived in the San Juan Capistrano house since 1923, so Thomas' biggest decision was not what to take but more what to leave behind. The two wood stoves were too big, so he sold them off. The dresser drawers which he slept in as a baby were also too large, so he left them behind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the days growing hotter and wild brush growing drier, Orange County fire officials on Friday will declare more than 165,000 acres of open land off-limits to the public. The start of the county's annual fire season means that hikers, campers, bikers and nature lovers must stay out of certain grassy areas until the rainy season returns. Fires can be triggered easily by an illegal campfire, fireworks or a simple spark from a starting car, County Fire Capt. Dan Young said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1995
Orange County in the early 1800s was largely devoid of trees, which were often the victims of brush fires and the periodic raging of the Santa Ana River. In 1873, the "timber laws" turned things around by offering settlers 160 acres if they would agree to plant 40 eucalyptus trees on the property. Much of Laguna Beach was settled in response to the offer. Source: "Reflections in Orange," by Warren Morgan
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An engine failed as an America West jetliner took off from Orange County's John Wayne Airport, but the pilot of the Boeing 757 was able to circle back and land safely. An airline spokesman said the 157 passengers aboard the Phoenix-bound plane were never endangered and that the landing was uneventful. The pilot radioed the tower to call out airport fire crews, but the plane was able to taxi to the gate without incident.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Centex Corp., the nation's largest home builder, has agreed to buy 915 single-family home lots in the master-planned community of Foothill Ranch in Orange County for about $45 million. Centex signed a letter of intent earlier this week to purchase the property, barely edging out Kaufman & Broad, California's largest home builder.
NEWS
May 26, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB and SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a battle of epic proportions. The lawyers brought their billable hours, the politicians their rhetoric and the protesters their placards. And when the smoke cleared, the antiairport forces uncorked the champagne. After years of bitter fighting, there would be no international airport at the defunct El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. Now what? If an airport isn't built at El Toro, something sometime will be built there.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can't exactly call it a civil war--in fact, it's more uncivil at times than anything else--but a proposal to build an international airport in Orange County has touched off a near-rebellion that has strained friendships and families along north-south lines. It has stirred hot, if premature, discussion of forming a new county, at least in the south where the airport would be located. Some in south Orange County have flirted with the idea of boycotting pro-airport Disneyland.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The oil company man stands on a rise over this city named for its tar-rich soil, a far cry in his handsome suit from the oil-soaked adventurers who first pumped crude here more than a century ago. Wielding a cell phone instead of a pickax, Dennis Chapman is a prospector of a different sort. His gaze is fixed beyond the massive pumps lumbering atop Brea's lakes of oil, on a cluster of men in hard hats working to mine his company's newest resource--real estate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1995
Orange County in the early 1800s was largely devoid of trees, which were often the victims of brush fires and the periodic raging of the Santa Ana River. In 1873, the "timber laws" turned things around by offering settlers 160 acres if they would agree to plant 40 eucalyptus trees on the property. Much of Laguna Beach was settled in response to the offer. Source: "Reflections in Orange," by Warren Morgan
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the days growing hotter and wild brush growing drier, Orange County fire officials on Friday will declare more than 165,000 acres of open land off-limits to the public. The start of the county's annual fire season means that hikers, campers, bikers and nature lovers must stay out of certain grassy areas until the rainy season returns. Fires can be triggered easily by an illegal campfire, fireworks or a simple spark from a starting car, County Fire Capt. Dan Young said.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Centex Corp., the nation's largest home builder, has agreed to buy 915 single-family home lots in the master-planned community of Foothill Ranch in Orange County for about $45 million. Centex signed a letter of intent earlier this week to purchase the property, barely edging out Kaufman & Broad, California's largest home builder.
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