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Orange County Latino Artist Network

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A pair of portraits figure prominently in the "Obras de OCLAN" exhibit at Fullerton's Hunt Library. One is of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, the other of Joe Hill, legendary activist in the American labor movement. Both painted by Emigdio Vasquez, a longtime member of the Orange County Latino Artist Network (OCLAN), they seem to make a connection between two cultures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A pair of portraits figure prominently in the "Obras de OCLAN" exhibit at Fullerton's Hunt Library. One is of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, the other of Joe Hill, legendary activist in the American labor movement. Both painted by Emigdio Vasquez, a longtime member of the Orange County Latino Artist Network (OCLAN), they seem to make a connection between two cultures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
Five of Orange County's leading Latino artists will be featured at the Hunt Branch Library exhibit, "Obras de Oclan," which opens today. OCLAN, the Orange County Latino Artist Network, works to enhance the ethnic, historic and social traditions of the local Latino community.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH
It's small--there are only nine dues-paying members--but without the Orange County Latino Artists Network, many of the county's Latino art exhibits during the past eight years may never have been mounted. In addition to showing the work of its core members, the grass-roots network approaches other local Latino artists when it plans an exhibit and provides them with an opportunity to reach the public, said Emigdio Chavez Vasquez, who helped found the organization in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1985 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Four years ago, things seemed to be looking up for a group of Latino artists in Orange County. They had acquired their own gallery in Santa Ana, and their opening exhibition, "The Last Chicano Art Show," was the largest all-Latino effort of its kind ever held in the county. But all that changed rapidly. The Galeria in Santa Ana was closed the following year when public funds ran out and major private support never materialized.
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