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Orange County Low Income Housing

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2002 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The row of concrete-block buildings known as the Esplanade Street Apartments looked beyond salvation. Walls at the complex in Orange were filled with termites and bathroom floors were almost entirely rotted out. Bedrooms were blanketed by mold and full of the stench of sewage. A decaying swimming pool filled with slimy water and litter sat in the middle of the beaten-down complex. Even police were wary of entering the place.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2002 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The row of concrete-block buildings known as the Esplanade Street Apartments looked beyond salvation. Walls at the complex in Orange were filled with termites and bathroom floors were almost entirely rotted out. Bedrooms were blanketed by mold and full of the stench of sewage. A decaying swimming pool filled with slimy water and litter sat in the middle of the beaten-down complex. Even police were wary of entering the place.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1992
Through much of the 1980s, low-income housing was simply not a fashionable topic in Orange County. There's little other plausible explanation for why the county squirreled away federal housing funds originally allocated for local use. While money gathered in a reserve account, advocates for the poor complained about the unmet need with some understandable bitterness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1992
Through much of the 1980s, low-income housing was simply not a fashionable topic in Orange County. There's little other plausible explanation for why the county squirreled away federal housing funds originally allocated for local use. While money gathered in a reserve account, advocates for the poor complained about the unmet need with some understandable bitterness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1990
The Orange County Building Industry Assn. appreciates your July 15 editorial "Opening Doors to Housing" about the positive contributions we are making to Orange County's low-income housing. As the former director of California's Department of Housing and Community Development, I participated in numerous negotiations for housing programs and housing dollars. It takes a tremendous effort to earmark state revenue for housing in view of the other overwhelming competing demands. Although California voters recently approved three bond measures totaling $600 million, the money is just a drop in the bucket toward the problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1987
On behalf of the 850 member companies of the Building Industry Assn., Orange County Region, I want to express our disappointment with your Nov. 8 editorial entitled "Safety Last," which addressed the mandatory residential fire sprinkler ordinance considered by the Board of Supervisors recently. To simply say that the unanimous decision by the Board of Supervisors to provide for the orderly implementation of a national fire sprinkler standard as part of the adoption of the 1988 Edition of the Uniform Building Code was because the board is too "builder oriented" shows a lack of the strong public policy reasons for the board's resolution of this admittedly complex regulatory proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ
More than 6,300 low-income Orange County residents filed applications for federal housing subsidies during a special enrollment period the past two weeks, but most will receive only spots on a waiting list that could last as long as five years. Friday marked the deadline to submit Section 8 subsidy applications that were first distributed March 1 by the Orange County Housing Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1988 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to find solutions to Orange County's low-income housing crunch, public officials and private business people met Friday to discuss concerted plans of action that could provide needed shelter for those at the bottom of the economic ladder. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters and the Orange County Housing Authority, the first-ever countywide forum included more than 100 housing officials, realtors, developers, elected officials and employers.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it the Latinization of L.A.'s private space. No wait, better make that the Japanization. Or would you even believe the Hollandization? Actually, no sociological shorthand can easily sum up the dramatic revisions in the way Southern Californians today are creating and experiencing privacy in their homes.
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