Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOrange County Medical Assn
IN THE NEWS

Orange County Medical Assn

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992
The Los Angeles Times deserves the thanks of the entire medical community for its editorial on the failures of the health care system in Orange County ("Health Care System Is Hurting Everyone," Sept. 13). It points out clearly and cogently the effect of inadequate funding for the poor on the medical care of the entire county, especially emergency care. Virtually every doctor in Orange County renders large amounts of free and reduced reimbursement care within and outside the office setting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000
Re "Money Should Go to Health Care," Dec. 19 editorial: If our Orange County supervisors, who are still elected by the people, have any consciousness of the health and well-being of the people of Orange County, they should not have any problem deciding what to do with the tobacco settlement money. It is blood money to be paid to the county and the people for the damage to and loss of health by the victims of tobacco. That could include anybody who has inhaled tobacco smoke over many years.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1992
The Nov. 29 editorial, "Humana Hospital Closure Is a Disaster," clearly illustrates the impact of many years of cost shifting on our medical infrastructure. Cost shifting is the practice of charging those who can pay (or their insurance company) for the care of those who cannot pay. Over the last several years, the growing disparity between the amount allowed (but often not actually paid) by Medi-Cal--and now even Medicare--has transformed a problem into a catastrophe. Orange County's hospitals, private physicians, charity clinics and university hospital can no longer shoulder the increasing burden of un- and undercompensated medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
I resent the suggestion of the Orange County Board of Supervisors that I am in any way responsible for despoiling the beaches of Orange County ("Medical-Waste Mess Leads to Fees for Health Professionals," Dec. 29). Evidently, someone is illegally dumping used syringes and needles and other potentially contaminated medical waste in the ocean, and this dangerous debris has washed ashore. Faced with the frustration of the inability to find the perpetrators, the board has decided to solve the problem by imposing a fee on all 2,000 independent doctors and dentists in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1989
Almost every day of the week, doctors of Orange County face a Catch-22 dilemma in trying to ensure that the public is well and diligently served. On the one hand, they are constantly accused of failing to police themselves, and on the other, they are constantly thwarted in any attempt to protect the public by accusation of self-interest and ever-increasing judicial restraints. The action of Superior Court Commissioner Ronald Bauer in stopping the attempt of the California State Board of Medical Quality Assurance, appointed by the governor to maintain professional standards of practice, to restrict the highly questionable activities of an Orange County physician is very frustrating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1992
The editorial "Bad Medicine for a Serious Ailment" (Oct. 23) provides the public with a grossly distorted view of the California Medical Assn.'s "Basic Health Care Coverage Initiative," Proposition 166, on the November ballot. The editorial offers no meaningful alternative for health-care reform and accuses the CMA of promising more than it can deliver. This is blatantly untrue. Furthermore, the serious ailment lies with those who propose nothing in response to the enormous health-care crisis in our state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1990
Re "Clinic Founder Accused of Bogus Billing" (Oct. 10): The state attorney general's efforts to police fraudulent medical practices are long overdue. As stated in the article, the Orange County Medical Assn. is also one of the complainants in the case involved. What I do not understand is the irresponsible statement attributed to investigator Kathy Schmidt that "on every street corner, there are little mini-Lehman Medical clinics trying to do the same thing." If this were the case, then I believe the attorney general has been grossly negligent in having failed to pursue such cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Decrying the crisis over medical care for the poor, the Orange County Medical Assn. announced Friday that it will hold special meetings to try to solve the immediate problem of women in labor being turned away from overcrowded UCI Medical Center. "This is not a UCI problem. It is more than the poor obstetrical patients. This is a very real demonstration of the failure of the state government to be responsible for the care of the people in this state," association President Dr. Russell C. Ewing II said in a prepared statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
I resent the suggestion of the Orange County Board of Supervisors that I am in any way responsible for despoiling the beaches of Orange County ("Medical-Waste Mess Leads to Fees for Health Professionals," Dec. 29). Evidently, someone is illegally dumping used syringes and needles and other potentially contaminated medical waste in the ocean, and this dangerous debris has washed ashore. Faced with the frustration of the inability to find the perpetrators, the board has decided to solve the problem by imposing a fee on all 2,000 independent doctors and dentists in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991
This letter is in response to "Polishing Their Bedside Manner" (Oct. 1) and the comments of Robert Miner, M.D., past president of the Orange County Medical Assn.: "Try and bill someone for talking to grandma. Doctors would really like to have that good bedside manner, but they can't afford the time. You don't get paid for being caring." I have to believe that this plastic surgeon is not reflecting the position of the average member of the associations he represents. If he is, then I have wasted the last 40 years of my life and I am concerned for my future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1992
The Nov. 29 editorial, "Humana Hospital Closure Is a Disaster," clearly illustrates the impact of many years of cost shifting on our medical infrastructure. Cost shifting is the practice of charging those who can pay (or their insurance company) for the care of those who cannot pay. Over the last several years, the growing disparity between the amount allowed (but often not actually paid) by Medi-Cal--and now even Medicare--has transformed a problem into a catastrophe. Orange County's hospitals, private physicians, charity clinics and university hospital can no longer shoulder the increasing burden of un- and undercompensated medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1992
The editorial "Bad Medicine for a Serious Ailment" (Oct. 23) provides the public with a grossly distorted view of the California Medical Assn.'s "Basic Health Care Coverage Initiative," Proposition 166, on the November ballot. The editorial offers no meaningful alternative for health-care reform and accuses the CMA of promising more than it can deliver. This is blatantly untrue. Furthermore, the serious ailment lies with those who propose nothing in response to the enormous health-care crisis in our state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992
The Los Angeles Times deserves the thanks of the entire medical community for its editorial on the failures of the health care system in Orange County ("Health Care System Is Hurting Everyone," Sept. 13). It points out clearly and cogently the effect of inadequate funding for the poor on the medical care of the entire county, especially emergency care. Virtually every doctor in Orange County renders large amounts of free and reduced reimbursement care within and outside the office setting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The doctor chuckled with delight as the brown-haired girl smiled, chanted and swung her arms playfully in the air above her crib. Dr. Stephen Osburn said he felt gratified that Christina, a profoundly retarded 4-year-old, has a chance to develop, maybe even learn a few words, now that he has helped her overcome a debilitating series of illnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991
This letter is in response to "Polishing Their Bedside Manner" (Oct. 1) and the comments of Robert Miner, M.D., past president of the Orange County Medical Assn.: "Try and bill someone for talking to grandma. Doctors would really like to have that good bedside manner, but they can't afford the time. You don't get paid for being caring." I have to believe that this plastic surgeon is not reflecting the position of the average member of the associations he represents. If he is, then I have wasted the last 40 years of my life and I am concerned for my future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991
I am writing to you after reading the column "Lean Times Demand More Efficient Leadership" (March 27) by Supervisor Gaddi H. Vasquez. I find myself in the involuntary role of contributing to the "leaner, more efficient way . . . " the county is doing business. I don't doubt that some of the measures to streamline health care have resulted in "one of the lowest county employee-to-citizen ratios among major counties in America. . . ." The elimination of the county hospital certainly reduced the number of county employees involved in health care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
We, the undersigned medical students, are deeply concerned with the major difficulties facing the estimated 150,000 to 250,000 persons in Orange County who are without any health insurance, private or otherwise--76% of whom are either workers or their dependents. We find it disturbing that in a county with a median income of $43,000 per year, local expenditures for health care are so poor that the county ranks 56th out of 58 California counties in per-capita health care dollars spent from local funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990
Recently, the newspapers have reported several indictments of Orange County physicians. While these proceedings obviously involve a small fraction of the doctors who care for our county's citizens, it does raise questions about the role of organized medicine in exposing and disciplining physicians whose conduct falls below the community's standard. The sad fact is that too often, medical professionals do know who these physicians are, but the system, the American system of justice, hamstrings an effective and quick elimination of the few impaired physicians from practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1990
Re "Clinic Founder Accused of Bogus Billing" (Oct. 10): The state attorney general's efforts to police fraudulent medical practices are long overdue. As stated in the article, the Orange County Medical Assn. is also one of the complainants in the case involved. What I do not understand is the irresponsible statement attributed to investigator Kathy Schmidt that "on every street corner, there are little mini-Lehman Medical clinics trying to do the same thing." If this were the case, then I believe the attorney general has been grossly negligent in having failed to pursue such cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1990
Congratulations on your excellent, in-depth interview with Thomas Uram ("County's Health Care Boss Fights a Fund-Short Battle," Sept. 2). He may be the only official in the county with the credibility and courage to explain to the public what the indifference of our lawmakers to the health-care system has done to the well-being of the poor and to describe the damage to the surviving medical-care resources still available to the not-so-poor. Uram is the most visible public servant to describe the enormity of the local health-care calamity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|