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Orange County Military Bases

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NEWS
April 13, 1991 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposal to close the massive Marine Corps Air Station here triggered a wave of speculation among real estate experts Friday that was slowed only by the realization that major problems threaten to complicate any sale. The base is on prime property, centrally located in a rapidly developing county where flat, buildable land is becoming scarce. But closing the base won't simply be a matter of turning around and selling it to a developer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fight over a proposed airport at El Toro has widened in recent months beyond a turf war in Orange County, with the future of the closed military base now a hot subject of debate in Los Angeles County as well. Critics of a proposal to double the size of Los Angeles International Airport are increasingly linking their opposition to the idea that Orange County should build a commercial airport at El Toro to help meet the region's growing demand for air service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a host of popular services open to the public for the past year at the former El Toro Marine base ends July 2, as some fear, it will be another example of internal bungling similar to the flawed process of trying to build a commercial airport there, according to critics of the planning process. A county report surfaced last week that showed that services on the base are causing a $623,000 deficit, even though they were intended to make a $500,000 profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO and MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To prevent the former El Toro Marine base from becoming a ghost town in July, Orange County supervisors voted Tuesday to push for continued operation of the base's horse stables, golf course, child-care center, recreational-vehicle storage lot and indoor swimming pool. Supervisors told county staff to begin a "full-court press" to sign a long-term lease with the Navy by May 31 that would allow the county to continue operating the popular programs past July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's decision to omit Orange County from a statewide military base reuse committee has drawn a strong protest from Supervisor Gaddi H. Vasquez, who argued Tuesday that a local representative should have been included, given the impending closure of two Marine bases here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO and MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To prevent the former El Toro Marine base from becoming a ghost town in July, Orange County supervisors voted Tuesday to push for continued operation of the base's horse stables, golf course, child-care center, recreational-vehicle storage lot and indoor swimming pool. Supervisors told county staff to begin a "full-court press" to sign a long-term lease with the Navy by May 31 that would allow the county to continue operating the popular programs past July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The impending closure of the Marine Corps bases at El Toro and Tustin will leave a void for the more than 200,000 military veterans who live in Orange County. Some do their shopping at El Toro's exchange store, where they pay no state sales taxes on retail goods such as clothing and appliances. The base is also a popular meeting place where veterans socialize, get medical exams and seek information about veterans' programs and benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County has applied to the Navy for a master lease for non-aviation uses of the entire former Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro, officials said Friday. In July, when the base closed, the Navy approved a restricted lease for control of only a handful of facilities, including the golf course, day-care center, stables, the officers' club and a recreational vehicle storage area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new study projecting future aircraft noise around the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro is causing concern among public officials and developers who fear that the findings could upset land-use plans and halt nearby home construction. Both the city of Irvine and the Irvine Co.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, contaminated by radioactive waste and other hazardous materials, will remain one of the 94 national environmental priority sites under a Department of Defense cleanup program, according to a report released Friday. For the first time, Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in San Diego County has been proposed for the cleanup list because of ground-water and soil contamination from PCBs, pesticides, solvents and fuels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a host of popular services open to the public for the past year at the former El Toro Marine base ends July 2, as some fear, it will be another example of internal bungling similar to the flawed process of trying to build a commercial airport there, according to critics of the planning process. A county report surfaced last week that showed that services on the base are causing a $623,000 deficit, even though they were intended to make a $500,000 profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County has applied to the Navy for a master lease for non-aviation uses of the entire former Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro, officials said Friday. In July, when the base closed, the Navy approved a restricted lease for control of only a handful of facilities, including the golf course, day-care center, stables, the officers' club and a recreational vehicle storage area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The impending closure of the Marine Corps bases at El Toro and Tustin will leave a void for the more than 200,000 military veterans who live in Orange County. Some do their shopping at El Toro's exchange store, where they pay no state sales taxes on retail goods such as clothing and appliances. The base is also a popular meeting place where veterans socialize, get medical exams and seek information about veterans' programs and benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's decision to omit Orange County from a statewide military base reuse committee has drawn a strong protest from Supervisor Gaddi H. Vasquez, who argued Tuesday that a local representative should have been included, given the impending closure of two Marine bases here.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposal to close the massive Marine Corps Air Station here triggered a wave of speculation among real estate experts Friday that was slowed only by the realization that major problems threaten to complicate any sale. The base is on prime property, centrally located in a rapidly developing county where flat, buildable land is becoming scarce. But closing the base won't simply be a matter of turning around and selling it to a developer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new study projecting future aircraft noise around the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro is causing concern among public officials and developers who fear that the findings could upset land-use plans and halt nearby home construction. Both the city of Irvine and the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
The evidence was troubling: A vast pool of underground water, stretching more than 3 miles from the edge of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station to the heart of residential Irvine, had been contaminated with a cancer-causing chemical. As the local water district official delivered his report at a recent public meeting, he built a case against the military as the source of the contamination. Seated in the front row, Navy Capt. S. R. Holm Jr., attired in freshly pressed dress blues, listened intently until it was his turn to speak.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Rick VanderKnyff, Susan Greene / Los Angeles Times
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION EL TORO Area: 4,739 acres. Personnel: 8,400. Annual payroll (active duty): $229 million (includes salaries for 4,200 personnel at Marine Corps Air Station Tustin). Description: The air station, commissioned in 1943, became home to the Third Marine Aircraft Wing Headquarters in 1955. Since 1971, the Marine Air Reserve under the command of the Fourth Marine Air Wing has conducted reserve training operations at El Toro.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, contaminated by radioactive waste and other hazardous materials, will remain one of the 94 national environmental priority sites under a Department of Defense cleanup program, according to a report released Friday. For the first time, Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in San Diego County has been proposed for the cleanup list because of ground-water and soil contamination from PCBs, pesticides, solvents and fuels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
The evidence was troubling: A vast pool of underground water, stretching more than 3 miles from the edge of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station to the heart of residential Irvine, had been contaminated with a cancer-causing chemical. As the local water district official delivered his report at a recent public meeting, he built a case against the military as the source of the contamination. Seated in the front row, Navy Capt. S. R. Holm Jr., attired in freshly pressed dress blues, listened intently until it was his turn to speak.
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