Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOrange County Music
IN THE NEWS

Orange County Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two cultural contributions Orange County is best known for worldwide were initially laughed off as fiascoes from the addled brains of crackpots. Business experts called it "Walt's Folly" when Walt Disney said he would spend $17 million to build the amusement park to end all amusement parks amid the orange groves of Anaheim.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
Driving 40 miles south on a jammed freeway to an aging Costa Mesa strip mall was never a nightlife priority for Ricky Alvarez. But inside the balmy crush of a sold-out Aloe Blacc show, howling rapturously and cradling a half-empty Red Stripe, the Saturday night schlep to Detroit Bar was paying off. "This is the first time I've been here," said Alvarez, 36, of Whittier. Dim Art Deco lighting reveals a retro-feeling room, with tweed wall cushions and a row of analog TVs blazing over the bar. A tight crowd of twentysomethings sport graphic tees, Motown revival wear and patterned minidresses.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | Randy Lewis
Orange County rock lost a tireless booster of its alternative-music scene with last week's departure of promoter Jim Palmer for, of all places, Las Vegas. But true to his well-deserved reputation as a champion of local music, the first words out of his mouth, speaking by phone from Sin City, were: "I think it will be interesting. And I hope I can tap into the local scene here--or get one going."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds
WITH the Pacific Symphony now settled in the just-unveiled Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, leaders of the Orange County Performing Arts Center can rest. For a minute. Then they'll get back to the business of wooing listeners, and the true competitors will be watching to see how many Orange County music lovers the Pacific Symphony can keep from sneaking north to Walt Disney Concert Hall, and how many Los Angeles listeners it can bring south to Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
For better or worse, it's been a relatively uneventful year on the local music scene. The good news is that there hasn't been anything approaching 1986's dismal record of four major music clubs folding. The bad news is that's because there haven't been four major clubs in operation this year--a shocking condition for a county of more than 2 million people just 40 miles from the heart of the West Coast entertainment industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Pinpointing the model for most rock performers' styles is usually easy, be it the classic sex 'n' swagger of Elvis Presley, the intellectual attack of Bob Dylan, the histrionics of Jimi Hendrix or some combination of all three.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
When the Golden Bear in Huntington Beach closed last week, Orange County lost its most significant piece of pop music history. The closing has drawn a wide range of responses from the local musical community, which expressed everything from shock and anger to resignation and even optimism following the demise of the club that featured Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Cream, Linda Ronstadt, Jackson Browne, Steve Martin, B.B.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No Doubt, Orange County's hottest-selling rock band, has chosen Jim Guerinot, the county's highest-profile music executive, as its new manager. Guerinot's Laguna Beach-based Rebel Waltz management company also represents the Offspring, another heavy-hitting O.C. rock act, with total worldwide record sales rivaling the 14 million No Doubt reaped with its 1995 release, "Tragic Kingdom." Guerinot also owns a record company, Time Bomb Recordings, financed by the German conglomerate Bertelsmann.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda's Doll Hut, the Anaheim roadhouse widely regarded by fans and musicians as the spiritual center of Orange County's original music scene, will close at the end of summer, its owner said Wednesday. Club owner and chief bartender Linda Jemison has decided to throw in the towel after 12 years because of steadily declining business over the last three years. "It had become a very expensive hobby," Jemison said over breakfast at a coffee shop in Orange on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds
WITH the Pacific Symphony now settled in the just-unveiled Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, leaders of the Orange County Performing Arts Center can rest. For a minute. Then they'll get back to the business of wooing listeners, and the true competitors will be watching to see how many Orange County music lovers the Pacific Symphony can keep from sneaking north to Walt Disney Concert Hall, and how many Los Angeles listeners it can bring south to Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2004 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
In the Orange County of a half-century ago, the John Birch Society was thriving and critics of rock 'n' roll warned that the music was a communist plot to corrupt teenagers. Man, were they clueless to what was happening in Orange County's hip and rocking underground. Locally made Fender and Rickenbacker guitars carried rock to the rest of the world and, some say, contributed to the downfall of European communism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2002 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The words "Orange County" and "hip" have been paired so rarely, except as an oxymoron, that even those who recognize the region's impact on music, fashion and extreme sports in recent years will be jolted to hear the county described as "possibly the hippest spot on the planet" in the VH1 news special "Orange County: American Hip Factory."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda's Doll Hut, the Anaheim roadhouse widely regarded by fans and musicians as the spiritual center of Orange County's original music scene, will close at the end of summer, its owner said Wednesday. Club owner and chief bartender Linda Jemison has decided to throw in the towel after 12 years because of steadily declining business over the last three years. "It had become a very expensive hobby," Jemison said over breakfast at a coffee shop in Orange on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two cultural contributions Orange County is best known for worldwide were initially laughed off as fiascoes from the addled brains of crackpots. Business experts called it "Walt's Folly" when Walt Disney said he would spend $17 million to build the amusement park to end all amusement parks amid the orange groves of Anaheim.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sun Theatre on Thursday hosted Dwight Yoakam in the swanky new Anaheim venue's first concert by a creatively thriving artist, this after three shows last week by acts running on the fumes of nostalgia. Yoakam fulfilled all expectations that come with being that rarity of the past 15 years, a country artist who consistently has reaped large commercial rewards without sacrificing song quality or tradition-steeped integrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an epic task, summarizing and anthologizing 20 years of the punk and alternative rock that grew from Orange County's fertile seedbed. Probably only one person, Jim Guerinot, the leading O.C. music mogul to have emerged from that movement, is capable of pulling it off--if he wants to attempt a box set on the subject, with all the permissions and financial negotiation that a suitably inclusive O.C. "best of" would require.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
The decade of the '90s will be "the decade of professional growth," says Pacific Chorale music director John Alexander. But Alexander and others in the Orange County music scene who voice the same opinion are only cautiously optimistic. Among other issues they cite is the continued competition between the local groups for audiences and financial support. "The traditional audience definitely will be fought over," says Philharmonic Society Executive Director Erich Vollmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Orange County lost four major rock clubs during the year--the Golden Bear, Safari Sam's, Radio City and Spatz--but gained one outstanding new showcase in the revitalized Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. Local music fans had hundreds of shows from which to choose throughout the year, from the big and bold (Eurythmics, Bob Dylan, Depeche Mode) to the quirky and intimate (Jonathan Richman, 10,000 Maniacs, Smithereens).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beethoven's nine symphonies form the bedrock of classical repertory. They span the balanced, ordered, classical world of Haydn and Mozart, and the emotionally expansive romantic world that followed. Listening to them provides a pleasant and complete education in what a symphony is and how it works. And they do that without sacrificing the moral force that hardly any music before or after Beethoven has equaled.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The exciting first blush of national recognition for the Orange County music scene has passed. Now, nearly five years after the Offspring finally smashed the "Orange Curtain" that had shrouded a wealth of underground talent, it's downright routine for several local exports each year to sell bundles of albums or at least get a fair shot in modern-rock radio rotations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|