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Orange County Parks

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NEWS
September 15, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A decade after two children were attacked by mountain lions at Ronald J. Caspers Wilderness Park, Orange County officials are moving to lift restrictions on youngsters using the park. Tim Miller, who manages the Orange County parks system, said Caspers may be the only park in the state that bars children from wilderness areas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Civic leaders in Irvine have authorized the use of subpoenas to help auditors dig deeper into an investigation of the financial management of the Orange County Great Park. The City Council voted 3 to 2 this week to move forward with a forensic audit after a preliminary report raised questions about spending, contracts and oversight of the planned 1,300-acre park, which has been in the works for more than a decade. Council members Larry Agran and Beth Krom, who helped steward the project from its beginnings until they lost the council majority in the 2012 city election, denounced the decision, which Krom called a "witch hunt.
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NEWS
October 23, 1986
Search teams aided by tracking dogs gave up a three-day search for a mountain lion that attacked and seriously injured a 6-year-old Huntington Beach boy last weekend at the Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park near San Juan Capistrano. "The trails simply went cold and the dogs seemed to have lost interest," said Tony Gimbrone, district supervisor for Orange County parks. "We are convinced that, as of this moment, there is not a single cougar in the park."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
A five-day search to find two missing Orange County hikers cost more than $160,000, but the hikers will not be billed for the effort, officials said. Nicolas Cendoya, 19, and Kyndall Jack, 18, both of Costa Mesa, called authorities about 8 p.m.  Easter Sunday  from Trabuco Canyon, saying they were lost but thought they were a mile from their car. The cellphone died soon after. The search-and-rescue effort to find the young adults took 1,907 hours, according to the Orange County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2002 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County parks officials Thursday banned open fires at two regional parks that border wilderness areas because of extreme fire danger. "Because of all the wildfires in the state and the fact that it's one of the driest years, we're doing this as a precaution," said Tim Miller, county parks superintendent. The ban applies to O'Neill Regional Park in Trabuco Canyon and Caspers Wilderness Park near San Juan Capistrano. Both are popular for day use and camping.
OPINION
August 16, 2004
Re "Orange County May Give Its Park Rangers the Power to Issue Citations," Aug. 11: The Orange County Board of Supervisors is, at last, considering giving citation authority to the rangers whose job it is to protect Orange County parks. As someone who occasionally volunteers his time as a docent in some of our county parks, I can say this step is long overdue. Most park visitors, when informed of an infraction of park regulations, will comply with a ranger out of "respect for the uniform."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2007 | By H.G. Reza and Times Staff Writer
The Board of Supervisors adopted a plan Tuesday to study how Orange County parks should be managed, and whether private trusts could take care of some land. Park officials will also consider turning over some small recreation areas to cities. Parker Hancock, head of the county's Harbors, Beaches & Parks Department, said the goal was to find ways to meet the recreational needs of a growing population. The department has been underfunded and understaffed in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998
The infestation of venomous red imported fire ants recently discovered across a 30-mile swath of Orange, Los Angeles and Riverside counties is probably too well-established to eradicate and will cost millions of dollars to manage, Orange County officials said Tuesday. The presence of more than a dozen mounds of the aggressive ants in Orange County parks, median strips and fields has convinced experts that there is unlikely to be a quick solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
A five-day search to find two missing Orange County hikers cost more than $160,000, but the hikers will not be billed for the effort, officials said. Nicolas Cendoya, 19, and Kyndall Jack, 18, both of Costa Mesa, called authorities about 8 p.m.  Easter Sunday  from Trabuco Canyon, saying they were lost but thought they were a mile from their car. The cellphone died soon after. The search-and-rescue effort to find the young adults took 1,907 hours, according to the Orange County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY
What it takes Mother Nature hundreds of years to create with wind and rain, Orange County parks employees will attempt to do in three years using bulldozers and artificial irrigation. Grading work that began this summer on the east side of William R. Mason Regional Park and a temporary irrigation system scheduled for installation next month are intended to help create 80 acres of artificial wetlands. They will be across Culver Drive from the more manicured section of the park.
SCIENCE
May 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The Southern California Bluebird Club's dedication to installing and monitoring nesting boxes in Orange County parks, golf courses, cemeteries and schoolyards has made the species' iridescent cobalt flash a common sight throughout the region. The effort started in 1984, when the club's founder, Dick Purvis, hung 10 hand-made boxes in the trees of Anaheim's Featherly Regional Park. A decade later, club members fledged about 1,000 Western bluebirds. This year, with about 2,000 nesting boxes placed in 40% of the county's parklands, “we expect to fledge about 8,800 bluebirds,” said Purvis, 85. “It's been a roaring success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2013 | By Rick Rojas and Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Investigators have abandoned the theory that the 20-year-old "loner" who went on a fatal shooting rampage as he drove through the heart of Orange County last month had somehow lured his final victim to a construction site parking lot where he was shot and killed. Detectives in Tustin said that based on witness accounts, they had believed there was some connection between Ali Syed and Jeremy Lewis, a 26-year-old plumber who was the last of three people authorities say Syed killed Feb. 19. But after checking phone records, police said Lewis' death appears to have been "a random act of violence.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Beth Krom
In its Oct. 27 article, " Orange County's planned Great Park a victim of hard times ," The Times paints a misleading picture by neglecting to provide adequate history and context. The truth is the Great Park in Irvine is not just moving forward. We are heading into our best year yet. Consider that the next year will see the addition of four tournament-quality soccer fields, a new visitors center, community gardens and our first water features. This will build upon the existing 200 acres of space regularly programmed with free public activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Katherine Tulich
Bluegrass legend Del McCoury has been touring for more than 40 years, but the 73-year-old still likes to shake it up when he performs. "I do an all-request show where the audience shouts out what they want to hear. The band doesn't know what we are going to do, I don't know what we are going to do. That's what keeps it exciting," he said, speaking from his home in Nashville. With his distinctive high-ranged vocals, some nimble guitar picking and sons Ronnie and Rob on mandolin and banjo, the Del McCoury Band are returning favorites at this year's Flights and Sounds Summer Festival, a world music feast that spans five themed weekends during the month of August at the Orange County Great Park in Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of new homes could be built along the perimeter of a retired Marine base in Orange County that officials envision being turned into one of the nation's great urban parks, according to a proposal being considered by city officials in Irvine. The proposal from developer Fivepoint Communities Inc. would more than double the number of residences that would be built on the property surrounding the Great Park by changing the zoning of land that had been marked for commercial use and offices, city officials said.
OPINION
May 28, 2011
Courting more than the vote Re "What makes them stray?" Opinion, May 22 Frank Farley focuses on sexual philandering by prominent politicians. While defining a "Type T personality" profile that fits these individuals, he tries to answer this question: "So why do we keep electing such people?" If, as Farley says, people admire their charisma and risk-taking behavior but often overlook their infidelities and narcissism, are we to accept his characterization of the United States "to some extent as a Type T nation, tilting in the risk-taking direction"?
SCIENCE
May 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The Southern California Bluebird Club's dedication to installing and monitoring nesting boxes in Orange County parks, golf courses, cemeteries and schoolyards has made the species' iridescent cobalt flash a common sight throughout the region. The effort started in 1984, when the club's founder, Dick Purvis, hung 10 hand-made boxes in the trees of Anaheim's Featherly Regional Park. A decade later, club members fledged about 1,000 Western bluebirds. This year, with about 2,000 nesting boxes placed in 40% of the county's parklands, “we expect to fledge about 8,800 bluebirds,” said Purvis, 85. “It's been a roaring success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991
The July 28 Commentaries, "Gnatcatcher: Imperiled Species or Specious No-Growth Ploy?" were excellent reading. While many aspects of Hugh Hewitt's argument seem factually illusive, one particular point is most pervasive: the veiled assertion that lands in "public ownership" are somehow forever protected from development or development impact. Lands in "public ownership" range from sidewalks, parking lots and flood control channels to military bases, greenbelts and parks. In and of itself, "public ownership" mandates no necessary protection, but such lands may be assumed to be protected by local codes or state or federal laws--codes, laws and/or legislation that are continually amended ("planning fluidity")
OPINION
May 21, 2011 | Jim Newton
In Southern California, there's nothing like a very large piece of real estate to cause discord. And the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station is nothing if not a large piece of real estate. Ever since the military decided to unload the base in the 1990s, Orange County residents have been bickering over what to do with the land, and the decision in 2005 to turn it into the Great Park hasn't ended the conflict. But first the history. Even before the military moved out, county residents divided into two bitterly opposing camps: those who supported using the site for a commercial airport and those who envisioned it as a vast and impressive park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Bill Greenhouse spent nine months at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station in 1943. Now 95, the former Marine master sergeant remembers the area well ? it was full of eucalyptus trees and orange groves. Today, the planes are long gone. All that's left of the station is a hangar. The property has become the sprawling Orange County Great Park. But Greenhouse and about 80 other veterans and their families celebrated their memories of the station Saturday afternoon as part of a yearly El Toro Homecoming.
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