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Orange County Perspective

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1995
Proposition 187, cutting off benefits to illegal immigrants, was divisive last year. Now attacks on the worth of bilingual education programs are prompting unhelpful quarrels among trustees of two school districts, Westminster and Anaheim Union. The question of how best to teach students who show up at the school door speaking only Spanish, Vietnamese or any of dozens of other languages heard in Orange County is a valid one.
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OPINION
May 19, 2002
Laguna Beach is a nice place to live, not only for its picturesque coastal setting, but also for its many places to eat, drink and spend money. And don't forget those wonderful police officers, teachers, cleaning crews and bank clerks who make the city work. Those who tackle the necessities of life in Laguna Beach, however, face a frustrating dearth of affordable housing in this oceanfront playground. If it were just Laguna Beach, it might be an easily contained problem. But many South County cities deserve criticism for their failure to push developers to include more low-income housing projects.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992
Budget-conscious parents and community leaders concerned about gang activities in the schools have found an attractive experiment being implemented in the La Habra City School District this year. The district is asking students in kindergarten through fifth grade to wear only white and navy-blue outfits. It's the first policy of its kind in Orange County, although some other districts have adopted regulations specifically restricting clothing associated with gangs.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the opening of the largest utility bankruptcy case in U.S. history, dozens of high-priced lawyers squeezed into a packed courtroom Monday to have a say in how Pacific Gas & Electric Co. will be allowed to spend its cash. Attorneys for gas suppliers told U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Dennis Montali that they are worried that PG&E might not pay their gas bills, which run into the tens of millions of dollars. Montali, who had read all the legal documents before the hearing, pointedly advised lawyers for PG&E to spiff up their legal briefs and get their court citations right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000
Re "Hail Laguna's Taxi Experiment," (Orange County Perspective, Dec. 3): Lagunatics. That's what we call ourselves, and we're proud of it. Living here for almost 30 years, I've come to realize that sometimes it's what Laguna Beach doesn't have that makes it special. Using OCTA funds that could be spent elsewhere is one issue, but encouraging a visual blight like subsidized taxi service will create an ersatz sophistication some of us deem unnecessary. Roving taxis could result in an altered traffic flow, with the taxis cruising and being flagged over in dense traffic a la New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
Re "Good Investment in Open Space" (Orange County Perspective, Oct. 19): Coal Canyon is a success story that demonstrates a cooperative spirit between public and private interests, between the many government agencies and focused-interest organizations involved in resource protection and enhancement, and between the environmental community and the development industry. I was very pleased to offer my support and help to acquire Coal Canyon as the county's newest open space. My office was fortunate enough to have funds available from the sale of county property in my district to offer $1 million to help in this effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2000
Re "Let's Take Care of Our Have-Nots" (Orange County Perspective, Oct. 8): It was nice to read in your editorial that the Sisters of St. Joseph in Orange are concerned about "justice for janitors." I guess the obvious question is why the good sisters will not allow organized labor to work in their own hospital. MIKE MANG Corona del Mar
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2000
Re "Invest in Drug Programs" (Orange County Perspective, Sept. 17): While I agree with some of the statistical information, I felt this editorial to be misleading. Since being elected to the Board of Supervisors, I have tirelessly worked to improve Orange County's drug rehabilitation programs. I firmly believe in rehabilitation and think of it as an integral part of Orange County's future. In fact, you may not realize this, but as part of the tobacco settlement negotiations, I fought long and hard for more than a year to get the "health care advocates" to see drug and substance abuse rehabilitation as a health care priority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1999
New federal census data show dramatic increases in population during this decade for southern Orange County, especially in Lake Forest, Irvine and Mission Viejo. Yet officials of the county's toll roads now acknowledge that they badly overestimated economic growth, which did not keep up with population growth. In an attempt to refinance about $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1999
The dictionary defines a gadfly as a person who annoys others or rouses them from complacency. For many city council members, the men and women who step to the lectern fit the definition of annoyances perfectly. But for those in the audience, the men and women trying to get their viewpoint across often are needed disturbers of the status quo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1999
For most Orange County residents, the problem of the homeless is out of sight and out of mind. For a good number of the homeless, worried about predators, being out of sight is just fine. Those holing up near freeway overpasses or in parks try to be as unobtrusive as possible. One reason is to escape crime. Another is to avoid arrest for violating ordinances against trespassing on private property or being in parks after hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1999
Further development in a new city is always going to get the attention of those who were there first. There may be some legitimate traffic issues raised by residents opposed to a 400-student private school proposed in Rancho Santa Margarita by the Islamic Center of Southern California. But some of the response of opponents seems to go beyond mere concern about congestion. As Orange County becomes more diverse, and religious groups and their institutions seek a place, fair treatment is essential.
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