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Orange County Population

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May 10, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's population crept up a scant 2% in 1989, overshadowed by the faster growth rates of its eastern and southern neighbors. And while the county's slower growth pace was anticipated--in fact, the annual growth rate has not really changed in the past decade--it is causing some economists and demographers to fret about the future. Figures released by the state Department of Finance pegged Orange County's population as of Jan. 1 at nearly 2.33 million, up from 2.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The housing vise began squeezing Francisco Morales seven years ago, and it hasn't let up. Morales and his family shared a three-bedroom house in Santa Ana with five other people until rent hikes and cramped conditions forced them to seek better quarters in the mid-1990s. Their situation hasn't improved much.
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NEWS
January 7, 1988
The county's total population rose to an estimated 2.08 million people in 1987, up over 11% from 1.8 million in 1980. The average city population rose to an estimated 57,917 in 1987 from 51,863 in 1980.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They come for the contagious gospel choir, the rollicking sermons and preacher's booming voice, rippling over the pews. At Santa Ana's Second Baptist Church, parishioners also come for the comfortable haven created by the faces that surround them--African American faces. "There is something uniquely special," said the Rev. John McReynolds, "about being with my people on a Sunday in worship."
NEWS
March 19, 1991
Orange County grew by 25% during the 1980s, but it still slipped a notch in the rankings of the country's most populous counties, according to a Census Bureau report released Monday. The county now ranks fifth, with 2.4 million people, after being passed by San Diego County, which has a population of 2.5 million. San Diego County grew by 34% since the 1980 census.
MAGAZINE
June 17, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, Patt Morrison is a Times staff writer who has covered Orange and L.A. counties.
WHAT IS IT between Los Angeles and Orange counties? Are we not warmed by the same ultraviolet rays, quenched by the same pirated water, ensnared in the same gill net of freeways? Are our differences really any wider than the line on a gerrymanderer's map? Let us put it to scholars, men of enlightenment and reason. Orange County historian Jim Sleeper (with feeling): "I wouldn't go up to Los Angeles to see Jesus Christ rassle a bear."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990
Orange County's population grew 2% last year after 46,800 more people moved in, mostly in the unincorporated areas, according to the latest state statistics released in Sacramento. Population estimates released Wednesday show that between January, 1989, and January of this year, the county' population grew from 2,279,400 to 2,326,200. Fueled by births and incoming residents, the unincorporated areas of Orange County absorbed 20,400 of the newcomers.
NEWS
September 17, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly all of Orange County's population growth in the first seven years of this decade is the result of increases in the Asian and Latino communities, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released this month. While the number of whites has remained steady over the decade, the county has seen some of the biggest increases in the nation in the numbers of Asian and Latino residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an annual grant application that has come to underscore Orange County's efforts to help the homeless, officials Thursday asked the federal government for $11.9 million in program funding. The request to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, part of HUD's annual budget process, comes as the county releases its most recent estimate of its homeless population. In 2001, the number of homeless is 19,740, up about 6% from 18,603 in 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001 | DANIEL YI and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County residents are more likely today than 10 years ago to shop, bank or go to movie theaters alongside a person of a different race or ethnic background, an analysis of the 2000 census data shows. In every encounter, those odds are now better than 50% in 16 Orange County cities, up from 11 cities a decade ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is the Orange County paradox: The more diverse we get, the farther apart we seem to drift. Over the last decade the statistical center points of Orange County's growing Latino and Asian populations have changed little, hovering just east of the Santa Ana River at about 17th Street, according to a fresh analysis of data from the recent 2000 census.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Avelino Garcia, a.k.a. the Cactus King, never drew large crowds until recently. Then again, until four years ago, he never had a venue. That's when El Nopal Mercado opened in San Juan Capistrano and he got his gig peeling needles off succulent nopal cactus paddles that are sold at the busy market. Now, everyone stops to say hello.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The numbers that flowed from Census 2000 last week were breathtaking in their description of how Latinos and Asians had displaced whites and African Americans in Southern California. But put the five-county region under a microscope and narrow your focus. Go below the county level, below the city level, down to the census-tract level, where a few thousand people live, where change was experienced subtly, slowly, sometimes imperceptibly, over 3,652 days.
NEWS
March 31, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The houses on the Rancho Santa Margarita side of the Mission Viejo border had just what P.J. Dye was looking for. They were new. They were affordable, running about $160,000 back in November 1990. And they weren't in Westminster, home of a growing Vietnamese-led immigrant community. "We just needed to get out of the neighborhood," said Dye, 46, a white mother of three who works in the office at Rancho Santa Margarita Intermediate School.
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Orange County's population going to shrink? Not likely, say experts, although nearly four in 10 adults surveyed in a recent Times Orange County Poll said they do not see themselves living here in five years. And six in 10 said they expect their children and grandchildren to move out eventually, too. The governor's office recently projected that Orange County's population will grow from 2.5 million to 3.7 million by 2040.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath the surface of Orange County's rapid transformation from a white, conservative enclave to a colorful stew of races and ethnicities is a generation of children even more diverse than their parents--promising even greater change to the county's political, economic and cultural landscape. U.S. Census figures show that whites account for 40% of residents 17 years old and younger in the county, although 51% of the overall county's population is white.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
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