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Orange County School Of Culinary Arts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
The Orange County School of Culinary Arts opened its doors this week to everyone from those who have trouble cracking an egg to those who want to brush up on ice sculpting techniques. The school, housed in a renovated Fullerton restaurant, is run by the North Orange County Regional Occupation Program, which provides vocational training to people over the age of 16.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
The Orange County School of Culinary Arts opened its doors this week to everyone from those who have trouble cracking an egg to those who want to brush up on ice sculpting techniques. The school, housed in a renovated Fullerton restaurant, is run by the North Orange County Regional Occupation Program, which provides vocational training to people over the age of 16.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | Christine Castro, (714) 966-7440
Resident Paul Bushay will be the first--and only--graduate of the Orange County School of Culinary Arts today. Bushay began at the Fullerton school when it first opened, in September 1997, and is the first to complete the requirements to earn a chef/cook certificate. His first job, as lead chef at Bunyan's Barbecue in Collins, Mo., will begin Aug. 1. The Orange County School of Culinary Arts, with 800 students and a staff of 14, is part of the North Orange County Regional Occupational Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
The new Orange County School of Culinary Arts is expected to open this fall. After a six-month search, the North Orange County Regional Occupation Program found a place for culinary arts classes, which have seen rapid enrollment growth. The site is a former restaurant that has been vacant for about six months. It is on Orangethorpe Avenue near Harbor Boulevard. A carpentry class has already started renovating the interior, said Pat Hansmeyer, a spokeswoman for the occupation program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1998
Hours are 10 a.m. to midnight All-day events * Embroidery Artistry presented by the Embroidery Guild * Quilting Quicks & Ques presented by Southern California Quilters * Model Airplane Building & Flying presented by Model Aircraft Scamps * Breeding swine and breeding beef on display * Small animals on display 10 a.m. * Youth Motorized Olympics (until 2 p.m.) * Pacific Coast Quarter Horse Show (until 6 p.m.) * Sock Hop * "Broadway on Tour" children's theater (until 6 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can we do without our cookie dough? Apparently not. According to the Food and Drug Administration, more than a third of all Americans regularly eat undercooked or raw eggs--in large part in homemade cookie dough. People seem less concerned about eating undercooked eggs than other meat products such as ground beef and chicken. This attitude frustrates food safety regulators, who say raw eggs carry bacteria that can cause illness and even death.
FOOD
January 6, 2011 | By Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tucked in the back room of a tiny powdered-sugar-dusted San Fernando Valley storefront, Armand Sahakian patiently tends to the sweet syrup bubbling in two giant copper caldrons. Six days a week, the owner of Nory Candy & Pastry delicately flavors each batch with citrusy drops of bergamot oil, rosewater or the essences of various fruits, then pours the candy into wooden trays to cool into gelée-like locum , the confection known as Turkish delight. That this story isn't one of C.S. Lewis' Turkish delight-filled "Chronicles of Narnia" fantasies is clear from the Winnetka shop's parking lot, where the weathered Nory Locum sign is wedged between those for a nail salon and dry cleaners.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a recruitment push unprecedented in its 45-year history, Disneyland is paying its staff as much as $500 to round up new employees--more than a week's wages for most park workers. At the nearby Orange County School of Culinary Arts, restaurants are snapping up graduates as soon as their training is over. And at a recent gathering sponsored by Anaheim's hotel association, the talk was not only of boosting pay and benefits, but of busing in help from faraway places.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a recruitment push unprecedented in its 45-year history, Disneyland is paying its staff as much as $500 to round up new employees--more than a week's wages for most park workers. At the nearby Orange County School of Culinary Arts, restaurants are snapping up graduates as soon as their training is over. And at a recent gathering sponsored by Anaheim's hotel association, the talk was not only of boosting pay and benefits, but of busing in help from faraway places.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Bella Panchal were to produce a movie about her recent work life, she might call it "The Incredible Shrinking Paycheck." Over the last three years, the 38-year-old speech-language pathologist has watched her annual income dwindle from more than $100,000 to about half that. It's not that she has lost clients, cut back hours or been lax about sending bills.
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