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Orange County Sports Hall Of Fame

SPORTS
October 30, 1991 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Becki McCafferty relives the fateful day in vivid detail, as if it happened last weekend and not in May, 1981. The former standout swimmer from Mission Viejo High School and UCLA was body surfing off Santa Monica when suddenly her body slammed into something, either a sand bar or an underwater reef, and went numb. She didn't know it at the time, but McCafferty had severed her spinal cord and broken three bones in her neck. She couldn't move her arms. She couldn't move her legs.
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SPORTS
February 5, 1997 | WENDY WITHERSPOON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the summer of 1962 when Ernest Severtsen first noticed them--girls, including his daughter, Gail, playing catch off to the side while their brothers played an organized baseball game in Buena Park. "There was nothing for them to do," Severtsen said. A few months later, under Severtsen's guidance, Bobby Sox softball was born. The organization launched its inaugural season in 1963 with eight leagues scattered around the state.
SPORTS
March 28, 1996 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before the three-point shot, Mark Wulfemeyer could score from anywhere on the basketball court. Wulfemeyer, 40, who will be inducted into the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame tonight, is considered by many to be the most famous high school basketball player in county history. But Wulfemeyer paid a price for his teenage fame, falling into relative obscurity after disappointing minor league baseball and college basketball careers.
SPORTS
April 29, 1998 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Someone told me just recently that poets are eulogists. It's their job, to eulogize. I didn't know that, but it makes sense. Because in almost every poem of mine there is a loss." --Dan Quisenberry, a week before he was diagnosed with brain cancer * More than a decade ago, before he was a poet, when he was one of the best closers in baseball, Dan Quisenberry listened as Kansas City Royal Manager Dick Howser said goodbye. Tears rolled down both men's cheeks.
SPORTS
December 12, 1994 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a man who did not acknowledge many happy days in a 20-year major league career spanning 2,344 games and 2,099 hits, Sunday should be one of Brian Downing's better days. That's when Downing, who spent 13 years with the Angels and became the team leader in 10 of 12 offensive categories, enters the Orange County Hall of Fame, alongside teammate and friend Nolan Ryan. But there will be no joy for Downing.
SPORTS
April 24, 1998 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Boone was considered one of the smartest modern-day baseball players to don the tools of ignorance. His peers considered him a student of the game, an excellent handler of pitchers, and sage observer of hitters' habits. "He was always in the game, knew everything that was going on," said Rod Carew, a former teammate and current Angel hitting coach. "He was always in control back there. If you had one word to describe him, that was it--control."
SPORTS
February 7, 1998
Bob Boone, Bob Boyd, Steve DeBerg, Debbie Green, Johnnie Johnson, Dan Quisenberry and Leon Wood will bring to 86 the number of inductees into the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame when they are enshrined in ceremonies on April 30. Boone caught a major-league record 2,264 games in his 19-year major league career, seven of which were with the Angels. The six-time Gold Glove Award winner and Villa Park resident is a scout for the Cincinnati Reds.
SPORTS
December 19, 1994 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Sports Hall of Fame's class of 1994 brought to the induction ceremonies much of the same things the previous 13 sets did--glittering achievements and genuine appreciation for what was happening to them. "I never thought I would make it," said George Latka, who also is in the World Boxing Hall of Fame as a boxer and referee. "There are so many high-profile people who deserve it. So many good athletes who are not in it yet.
SPORTS
April 28, 1998 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He looks as though he could still play some safety, but Johnnie Johnson releases his aggressions on a tennis ball these days. He finds competition not in shutting down No. 80 in a red and white jersey, but in opening up young people's minds to new horizons. "The greatest satisfaction I enjoyed was playing football," Johnson said. "I didn't know if there was anything that could give me that same satisfaction. My work with young kids comes as close to that feeling as anything."
SPORTS
January 31, 1997 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In all probability, famous Negro League stars such as Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, Cool Papa Bell, Ray Dandridge and Leon Day--all of whom are in baseball's Hall of Fame--never played the game in Orange County. But starting Saturday, some of their memorabilia will be on public display in the Negro Leagues exhibit at the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame, adjacent to Anaheim Stadium, in conjunction with Black History Month.
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