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Orange County Symphony Of Garden Grove

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after it was learned that a community orchestra in Santa Ana is in financial trouble, one here has announced a fiscal crisis. Officials of the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove, formerly the Garden Grove Symphony, said Thursday that the organization is $121,000 in debt and needs $30,000 to hold its next concert on May 4 as scheduled. If the money is not raised by April 30, board President Dick Hain said, the organization will consider filing for bankruptcy.
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NEWS
August 31, 1997 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a symphony orchestra that had no musicians, no concert hall and no conductor, and was missing almost everything that makes an orchestra an orchestra. Overwhelmed by debt and unpaid taxes, the Orange County Symphony had fallen so low that rumors of its death had been constant for three years. But the symphony lives. It is operating in the black and this summer had a series of three concerts in Coto de Caza. In November, the symphony will give its regular Children's Concert in Garden Grove.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
Forced to the sidelines for a year and unable to perform because of mounting debts, the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove made an upbeat return last week, performing in a free Children's Concert at Don Wash Auditorium. About 1,000 children attended the program, sang with the orchestra and gave a standing ovation to two young classmates who were featured violinists in a Bach concerto. To make the performance possible, nearly 50 musicians played without pay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Money Problems: Financial woes are plaguing another Orange County orchestra. Officials of the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove (formerly the Garden Grove Symphony) say the organization is $121,000 in debt and needs $30,000 to hold its next concert May 4. If the money is not raised by April 30, board president Dick Hain said, the organization will consider filing for bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove Sept. 25, 8 p.m. at the Celebrity Theatre, 201 E. Broadway, Anaheim: Philippe Bender, conductor; Eugenia Zukerman, flute: Mozart's Flute Concerto No. 2; Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantastique"; Debussy's "Prelude a l'Apres-midi d'un Faune." Nov. 14, 8 p.m. at the Don Wash Auditorium, 11271 Stanford Ave.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Browning gave the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove a run for its money Saturday night at Don Wash Auditorium. According to general manager Yaakov Dvir-Djerassi, Browning commands the largest fee ever offered by the board--$8,000--a sum that sent organizers racing for corporate sponsorship. Pianist and orchestra collaborated in Rachmaninoff's "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini," which requires lightning-quick repartee between solo and orchestral forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove voted Monday to appeal its California Arts Council panel rating on the grounds that no council official has attended a performance by the orchestra in at least four years. A council panel, using tape-recordings to assess quality, recently gave the orchestra a 2-plus rating on a scale of 1 to 4. Typically, only groups rated 3-minus or above get grants. The orchestra received $3,387 from the state last year and applied for $29,000 for fiscal 1992-93.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove has sidestepped a potential cash-flow crisis by arranging a loan to replace city funds that were unexpectedly held up last week by the City Council. The council last week delayed arts grants totaling $43,000 to three Garden Grove groups, asking for annual operating budgets and other financial records.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove has sidestepped a potential cash-flow crisis by arranging a loan to replace city funds that were unexpectedly held up last week by the City Council. The council last week delayed arts grants totaling $43,000 to three Garden Grove groups, asking for annual operating budgets and other financial records.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Symphony has fired general manager Yaakov Dvir-Djerassi, an eight-year staff member who helped found the orchestra and saw it through several major changes. Dvir-Djerassi said Friday that "some personal frictions" with new board president Lorraine Reafsnyder, a Tustin businesswoman who took over on July 1, were behind his termination. Reafsnyder could not be reached for comment Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove voted Monday to appeal its California Arts Council panel rating on the grounds that no council official has attended a performance by the orchestra in at least four years. A council panel, using tape-recordings to assess quality, recently gave the orchestra a 2-plus rating on a scale of 1 to 4. Typically, only groups rated 3-minus or above get grants. The orchestra received $3,387 from the state last year and applied for $29,000 for fiscal 1992-93.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove Sept. 25, 8 p.m. at the Celebrity Theatre, 201 E. Broadway, Anaheim: Philippe Bender, conductor; Eugenia Zukerman, flute: Mozart's Flute Concerto No. 2; Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantastique"; Debussy's "Prelude a l'Apres-midi d'un Faune." Nov. 14, 8 p.m. at the Don Wash Auditorium, 11271 Stanford Ave.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the demise of the South Coast Symphony, the county's only other small-budget orchestra--the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove--is tightening its belt and at the same time trying to reach out to new audiences and supporters. Saddled with a deficit between $50,000 and $60,000, the OCSGG will play only three concerts in 1992-93, one fewer than last season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1992 | ROBERT BARKER
City officials have agreed to contribute more than $27,000 to local cultural arts pursuits, including featured appearances by violinist Oleh Krysa at three concerts with the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove in November. The symphony is receiving $11,765, as is the Garden Grove Assn. for the Arts, which manages the Village Green Cultural Arts Complex. Village Green officials plan to install an automated telephone system at the Gem Theatre with their share of the money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
Forced to the sidelines for a year and unable to perform because of mounting debts, the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove made an upbeat return last week, performing in a free Children's Concert at Don Wash Auditorium. About 1,000 children attended the program, sang with the orchestra and gave a standing ovation to two young classmates who were featured violinists in a Bach concerto. To make the performance possible, nearly 50 musicians played without pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1992 | ROBERT BARKER
City officials have agreed to contribute more than $27,000 to local cultural arts pursuits, including featured appearances by violinist Oleh Krysa at three concerts with the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove in November. The symphony is receiving $11,765, as is the Garden Grove Assn. for the Arts, which manages the Village Green Cultural Arts Complex. Village Green officials plan to install an automated telephone system at the Gem Theatre with their share of the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1991
Criminals must be overjoyed by Yaroslavsky's proposal to increase the number of women police officers and reduce crime by communication skills rather than by force or brutality. Everyone, turn in your weapons and get ready for a war of words. JOHN G. KELLY Whittier
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