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Orange County Symphony Of Garden Grove

ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1993 | BOB BARKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The financially struggling Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove on Tuesday asked the City Council for a $20,000 bailout so that it can pay back wages to its union musicians. Without the money, the musicians will not be allowed to play during the coming concert season, putting the future of the 8-year-old orchestra itself in question.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County arts groups stand to receive nearly 30% less California Arts Council money than last year, partly because of state budget cuts and partly because some organizations have deteriorated in the eyes of the council. According to figures released Friday, CAC advisory panels are recommending 14 local groups for a total of $202,838 this year, down from $285,409 in 1991-92.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a decline in ticket sales and corporate support, South Coast Symphony will shut down, just two months after announcing its 1992-93 season. The board of directors of the 8-year-old orchestra called an emergency meeting Wednesday and voted to tentatively dissolve the organization. The surprise decision will go to a full board vote Sunday, but compliance is expected, according to board chairwoman Arlene Schafer. "We just couldn't go on with what was happening," Schafer said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a show of holiday generosity, a new arts foundation on Friday awarded a total of nearly $1 million to a dozen Orange County arts groups and programs, including $250,000 to the Grove Shakespeare Festival, the troupe's largest gift ever. The Leo Freedman Foundation, which also gave $250,000 to the Orange County Performing Arts Center, was established by Leo Freedman of Beverly Hills, an arts patron and real estate developer who died in 1989 and whose business ventures mainly were in Anaheim.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
On July 29, 1924, the Ku Klux Klan took over the green patch of Anaheim now known as Pearson Park for a night of pointy-hooded marching. According to historical accounts, more than 10,000 people gathered for that Klan procession and induction ceremony. At the time, Klan members controlled four of the five City Council seats in Anaheim; in a recall election in February, 1925, the citizenry voted the Klan slate out.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The grim economy of 1991 turned grimmer in 1992, and had it not been for the surprise arrival of a new arts benefactor at the close of last year, the Orange County arts community would have been a few steps closer to a real-life re-enactment of Dickens' "Bleak House." But even with some good news, 1992 fell far short of conjuring up "Great Expectations." Corners that were cut in 1991 were cut off in '92, as several groups reduced or curtailed activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On top of recent financial problems and efforts to recover from a long absence of top administrators, the Newport Harbor Art Museum is now in jeopardy of losing state arts council funding. The Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove also may not receive a California Arts Council grant, and four other prominent local arts groups may get smaller grants this year as a result of lowered rankings by council review panels announced this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the cancellation of its 1993 outdoor summer season, GroveShakespeare received a vote of confidence from the City Council even as the last remnants of the Grove's board of trustees decided to seek protection from creditors under federal bankruptcy laws. At the same time, a dissenting council member has charged that the theater company "mishandled" funds awarded by the city in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least three Orange County cities have expressed interest in becoming home to Los Angeles' Southwest Museum--which is looking for new, larger quarters--but only one appears to be winding up for the pitch. Southwest officials announced earlier this summer that they are seeking to move the 79-year-old repository of American Indian artifacts out of its cramped digs in Mount Washington in northeast L.A. The museum has solicited bids for a new home from about 140 Southern California cities.
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