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Orange County Tax Assessor

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NEWS
December 8, 1994
Many Orange County residents reacted with frustration and anger at the county's financial crisis. Here is a sampling of comments received from readers invited to telephone the newspaper's TimesLine number with their comments. "Obviously, (resigned County Treasurer-Tax Collector) Robert Citron has to take the major hit on this, but I believe that in any government system there is supposed to be a system of checks and balances. I would like to know what happened to them. "Obviously, Mr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to make it possible to cut Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs' pay for refusing to apply for state loans that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals. Saying that chipping at the assessor's $100,000-a-year salary is the only way to convince Jacobs to cooperate in seeking the loans, the board voted 3 to 2 to consider adjusting Jacobs' pay on an annual basis beginning in January 1999.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors gave Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs a choice Tuesday--either apply for state money that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals or face a pay cut. In a 4-1 vote, the supervisors gave Jacobs until Feb. 24 to seek the $6.8 million he has repeatedly shunned, even though they would give him the extra staff he has said he needs to relieve the jam. If Jacobs refuses, the board could decide at its next meeting to cut his $100,000-a-year salary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors gave Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs a choice Tuesday--either apply for state money that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals or face a pay cut. In a 4-1 vote, the supervisors gave Jacobs until Feb. 24 to seek the $6.8 million he has repeatedly shunned, even though they would give him the extra staff he has said he needs to relieve the jam. If Jacobs refuses, the board could decide at its next meeting to cut his $100,000-a-year salary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to make it possible to cut Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs' pay for refusing to apply for state loans that could relieve a backlog of property tax assessment appeals. Saying that chipping at the assessor's $100,000-a-year salary is the only way to convince Jacobs to cooperate in seeking the loans, the board voted 3 to 2 to consider adjusting Jacobs' pay on an annual basis beginning in January 1999.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1986
The Irvine Co. won delay of an appeals board hearing Tuesday in its approximately $1.7-billion dispute with the Orange County tax assessor over the taxable value of the company's giant landholdings. A three-man assessment appeals board, meeting in Santa Ana, overruled objections of the county assessor's office and agreed to Irvine Co. attorney Robert E.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County tax assessor's office severely overestimated the value of an offshore oil platform and overcharged its owners more than $1 million in taxes, a county appeals board has ruled. But lawyers for the county said Tuesday that they may appeal that ruling in Superior Court. If the county elects not to appeal, it would have to return almost $1.2 million to Chevron USA for taxes that the company paid from 1986 to 1988 on an oil platform 1.5 miles off the coast of Seal Beach.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County tax assessor's office won a round in its battle with 10 Orange County cable television companies Friday when a Superior Court judge dismissed a lawsuit against the county and Assessor Brad Jacobs. The cable firms, outraged over a new method of valuing their property that has led to a doubling and tripling of their property taxes, alleged in the lawsuit that their civil rights were being violated by discriminatory tax treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1986 | TED APPEL, Times Staff Writer
Irvine homeowner Debbie Carden was unpleasantly surprised this week when she opened her mailbox to discover a bill from the Orange County tax assessor for close to $800 in additional property taxes. "Anytime you get a bill you weren't expecting, it causes problems," Carden said. "And you have to pay it before Christmas, so you have to rearrange things."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the face of a cable TV industry advertising blitz complaining of higher tax bills, Orange County Assessor Bradley L. Jacobs lashed back Monday, accusing "Big Cable" of violating campaign reform laws by lying to residents and using a monopoly to gouge customers with inflated rates. "That monopoly allowed Big Cable to raise prices by more than 400% since 1983, and it's about time that the people got some of that back," Jacobs said in a press release.
NEWS
December 8, 1994
Many Orange County residents reacted with frustration and anger at the county's financial crisis. Here is a sampling of comments received from readers invited to telephone the newspaper's TimesLine number with their comments. "Obviously, (resigned County Treasurer-Tax Collector) Robert Citron has to take the major hit on this, but I believe that in any government system there is supposed to be a system of checks and balances. I would like to know what happened to them. "Obviously, Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1997
While the Asian markets were faltering and before stocks tumbled on Wall Street last week, Orange County got several pieces of favorable news that suggest a promising future for the local economy. One came from an economic forecast, and the other came in a report from the Orange County tax assessor. The findings in these reports are some of the very "fundamentals" in the economy that experts were citing during Wall Street's dramatic "correction" last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County tax assessor, in a report that will be welcomed by school districts and other government agencies heavily dependent on property tax revenue, said Thursday that the value added to this year's tax roll by new construction projects and the resale of existing real estate was the highest in a decade. The report said that home and business resales along with new building added $4.29 billion to the county's $178-billion property tax rolls between Jan.
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