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Orange County Transportation Commission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
By a 4-3 vote, a panel studying the proposed consolidation of the county's bus agency and transportation commission rejected a bid Monday to delay state legislation that would permit the merger. Introduced by state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach), the merger bill (SB 838) is scheduled for a May 2 hearing before the Senate Transportation Committee in Sacramento. Santa Ana Mayor Daniel H. Young, Tustin Councilman Richard B. Edgar and Orange County Transit District board member William E. Farris tried to delay the legislation until next year for further study of the costs involved and possible alternatives to consolidation, said Tom Fortune, spokesman for the Orange County Transportation Commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former chairman of the Orange County Transportation Commission has joined critics of a proposed light-rail system linking Irvine and Costa Mesa, saying it shortchanges residents promised a mass-transit rail service that would run the length of the county. Dana W.
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NEWS
August 1, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transportation chief Stan Oftelie has become Orange County's reluctant rich uncle, the man with the awesome means to bail local government out of bankruptcy. For months, behind every county financial recovery scheme has stood someone coveting the bank account of the agency Oftelie runs, the Orange County Transportation Authority, swollen with $800 million in cash and hundreds of millions more in sales tax revenue that will flow to OCTA into the next century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1988
Also on Thursday, the Orange County Transportation Commission will honor companies and organizations that have contributed to easing the county's traffic problems. Transportation Partnership Awards will be given in the categories of ride-sharing, alternative work hours, incentives and traffic circulation improvements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1988
Your editorial regarding partisanship in the selection of the public member for the Orange County Transportation Commission (OCTC) missed the mark. People might cite any number of reasons for recommending a particular candidate. And since Orange County is overwhelmingly Republican, being a Republican is no sin. I believe the commissioners selected Dana Reed because of his outstanding qualifications, and you do a disservice to them to suggest otherwise. RANDY SMITH Yorba Linda
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1986
Transit Tax Measure Signed: Gov. George Deukmejian Friday signed into law a measure that gives the Orange County Transportation Commission a larger share of county sales tax revenues. Officials of the transportation planning agency said it would have had to cut its staff next year without the estimated $500,000 in additional revenues it will get under the measure, which was sponsored by state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987
The high-occupancy vehicle lane on the Costa Mesa Freeway has been controversial from the day it was opened. Subsequently, the Orange County Transportation Commission's "55 HOV Lane Committee" promised a number of engineering changes to improve safety, such as restriping, re-evaluating HOV lane entrance and exit locations and additional signs. That was 1 1/2 years ago! Not one change has been implemented to date. Perhaps the HOV committee should be replaced with members who can do things instead of those who decide that nothing can be done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
County Supervisor Thomas F. Riley was elected chairman of the Orange County Transportation Commission for a one-year term Monday, replacing Brea Councilwoman Clarice A. Blamer. "During this next year, as we take our 20-year Master Plan to the public," Blamer told the commissioners when nominating Riley to succeed her, "this commission needs the leadership of someone with Tom Riley's experience, integrity and character."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Orange County's cash-strapped toll road officials, who have borrowed money to pay bills, spent $13,300 on meals and $29,200 on car allowances last year, according to a tally prepared by the Transportation Corridor Agencies. In comparison, the Orange County Transportation Authority spent about $4,000 on meals and $109,560 on staff car allowances, OCTA officials said. These and other expenditures were detailed this week by both agencies in response to state Sen. Quentin L.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN and ANN CONWAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
James Roosevelt was remembered by friends and colleagues Tuesday as a legendary figure who moved with equal ease among the rich, the powerful and others less fortunate. "It's the end of an era," said Orange County Supervisor Thomas F. Riley, who counted Roosevelt among his closest friends. "There's nobody out there who is quite like him." Riley and others described how Roosevelt, by virtue of his family and political work, had easy entree to the power elite in Sacramento and Washington.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending a decade on the state's top transportation panel, former Orange County Supervisor Bruce Nestande said Wednesday that he will announce his resignation today from the California Transportation Commission. Citing the press of business, Nestande said he is quitting effective June 30 "because the time is right" and he wants to avoid any potential conflicts of interest between his commission duties and his job as a consultant for various Orange County developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Today the OCTD and OCTC do a disappearing act and reemerge as the new and hopefully improved OCTA. While the change sounds like little more than a bureaucratic shake-up in the murky alphabet soup of transportation agencies, the merger of Orange County's Transportation Commission and transit district creates a single, more powerful entity to oversee $500 million a year in traffic improvements and set priorities affecting commuters for decades to come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
South County commuters, who endure an agonizing squeeze through the clogged junction of the Santa Ana and San Diego freeways, can expect relief in mid-1997, officials said Monday. Remodeling of the interchange known as the El Toro Y will begin in the fall of 1993, two years earlier than the previous schedule under a plan approved by the Orange County Transportation Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of prominent business and development interests--concerned about a legal challenge to Orange County's first toll road--has formed a coalition and hired attorneys to help defend the proposed San Joaquin Hills Corridor project. The private group, which calls itself the Corridor Business Coalition, intends to raise money and provide legal services that will augment the efforts of the public agency that has been sued--the Orange County Transportation Corridor Agencies. Robert K.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | DAVE LESHER and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Some people enter politics for the power and others for a cause, but those who know Dana W. Reed say he is motivated by a fascination--if not an obsession--with the process of how government works. Reed has been a lifelong engineer in the machinery of California politics. His fascination began when he was a 12-year-old at the 1956 Republican National Convention in San Francisco, where he watched the nomination of President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
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