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Orange County Vector Control District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1987
Entomologist Honored: Irvine resident Gilbert L. Challet, manager of the Orange County Vector Control District, has been honored by the Entomological Society of America as 1986's Outstanding Medical Entomologist of the Year. Challet was chosen for the award, which was presented at the society's annual December conference held in Reno, from a membership of more than 1,700 professional entomologists in the United States. Challet has managed the Orange County Vector Control District since 1974.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2004 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Vector Control District decided Thursday to shut down a program aimed at controlling red imported fire ants. About a dozen workers were laid off. The move came five months after the state Department of Agriculture said it would stop funding the program because of California's fiscal problems. Orange County officials said they feared the decision could significantly affect the county's quality of life. Fire ants are considered a threat to agriculture and have attacked people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1999 | Jason Leopold, (949) 574-4204
The City Council last week made appointments to two Orange County commissions. Council member Brenda Ross was named to the Orange County Library Advisory Board and resident Bob Bauer was appointed to the Orange County Vector Control District. Information: (949) 597-4361.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Vector Control District may ask homeowners for an additional $4 a year to pay for its suddenly underfunded fight against the red imported fire ant, a district spokesman said Friday. But some members of the district's board of directors say they oppose increasing the tax, which would generate about $3 million a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
City Councilwoman Alice B. Jempsa this week was named to a third term on the Orange County Vector Control District's Board of Trustees, which handles rodent and insect problems. Jempsa, who does not disclose her age, was appointed to the board in 1990 and again in 1996. The new assignment is for two years. The City Council unanimously approved the appointment at Jempsa's request.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | Raul Gallegos, (714) 520-2512
Councilman John C. Holmberg has resigned because he's moved out of the city. Holmberg's resignation on Friday came a few weeks before the end of his latest four-year term; he has served on the council for 16 years. Holmberg was first elected to the council in 1980. He was reelected in 1984 and 1988, and after a hiatus of a few years, he was elected again in 1996. He served as mayor in 1985, 1987 and 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
You may not know Gil Challet's name, but for nearly 30 years he has been controlling Orange County's rodent and bug populations. Challet, head of the Orange County Vector Control District since 1974, retired Tuesday to pursue independent research on diving beetles in Brazil and other parts of Latin America, a personal interest that blossomed while working for the district. The beetles feast on mosquito larvae.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer and Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writers
The head of the Orange County Vector Control District is so concerned about the West Nile virus that he may suspend his agency's rat patrol in order to concentrate solely on virus-carrying mosquitoes. There have been no human cases of West Nile virus in Orange County, but the virus was recently detected in mosquitoes in Imperial County, a sign that the dangerous disease could spread to Orange County and elsewhere throughout Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1985 | G. M. Bush
Due to several cases of mosquito-borne encephalitis last fall--one of which proved fatal--county health officials have expanded a disease surveillance program and are asking the public to help stem the spread of the potentially dangerous insect. B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first step in the eradication of fire ants was unanimously approved by county supervisors Tuesday, beginning what could be a five-year battle plan, said county Agriculture Commissioner Rick LeFeuvre. The board's action allows the state Department of Agriculture and Food to prepare contracts with the Orange County Vector Control District, which was selected as the subcontractor, LeFeuvre said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer and Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writers
The head of the Orange County Vector Control District is so concerned about the West Nile virus that he may suspend his agency's rat patrol in order to concentrate solely on virus-carrying mosquitoes. There have been no human cases of West Nile virus in Orange County, but the virus was recently detected in mosquitoes in Imperial County, a sign that the dangerous disease could spread to Orange County and elsewhere throughout Southern California.
OPINION
August 24, 2003
The state got everything it bargained for when it hired the Orange County Vector Control District to fight fire ants in the southern part of the county. The district has done such an exemplary job that pest-control managers from other afflicted areas travel to the county to pick up tips. Vector Control, meanwhile, picks up enough extra cash from this and other outside contracts to keep its workers on staff and its public operations running without raising homeowner fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2003 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
At a time when government is being asked to do more with less money, one obscure public agency believes it has found the answer. The Orange County Vector Control District, charged with controlling mosquitoes and other disease-transmitting pests, sells extra services to other government agencies and even one business, Disney's California Adventure theme park. This lets the district not only stay on budget, but also turn a profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of summer's most incessant pests has turned out to be a big beneficiary of a new policy protecting California's waterways: the bloodsucking, disease-carrying mosquito. Local agencies charged with hunting down and killing the insects say their never-ending battle suffered a severe blow last month when the state adopted restrictions on the use of aquatic pesticides--their best weapon against mosquito larvae.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Miller isn't sure what to expect. It's a few minutes before 9 on a fog-shrouded morning and a neighbor of this seedy-looking house in Cypress has put in a call to the mosquito police. Which is why Miller is here. He carries a badge. Miller, 47, is an inspector for Orange County Vector Control, which sounds vaguely like some intergalactic bureaucracy. Vector Control's mission, though, is real: to eradicate rats, mosquitoes and other pests that can spread infectious diseases to humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | Raul Gallegos, (714) 520-2512
Councilman John C. Holmberg has resigned because he's moved out of the city. Holmberg's resignation on Friday came a few weeks before the end of his latest four-year term; he has served on the council for 16 years. Holmberg was first elected to the council in 1980. He was reelected in 1984 and 1988, and after a hiatus of a few years, he was elected again in 1996. He served as mayor in 1985, 1987 and 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Under the right conditions, mosquitoes are rather prolific. In the next few seconds, virtually every female mosquito could deposit as many as 400 eggs each in any puddle throughout the county. And today, the conditions don't get much better. With record-breaking rainfall in March, the Orange County Vector Control District is gearing up for a boom in the county's mosquito population, triggered by the recent renewal of parched water sources, both natural and urban.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Have no fear, Vectorman is here. Clad in a red bodysuit, sunshine-yellow cape and high-top sneakers, he is the mascot of Orange County's Vector Control District, and he's ready to help fight the pesky, disease-carrying mosquitoes that promise to plague Southern California this summer. "The goal is to reduce the number of mosquitoes--it's as simple as that--and we want the public's help," said Fred Beams, assistant manager of the district and a sort of real live Vectorman, minus the cape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors on Tuesday approved using $6 million in state funds to eradicate red imported fire ants, which now infest more than 500 square miles of Orange County. The vote comes a month after supervisors approved a program to eradicate red fire ants by the Orange County Vector Control District with funding from the state Department of Food and Agriculture, county Agriculture Commissioner Rick LeFeuvre said. But the original program only included funding through June of this year, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first step in the eradication of fire ants was unanimously approved by county supervisors Tuesday, beginning what could be a five-year battle plan, said county Agriculture Commissioner Rick LeFeuvre. The board's action allows the state Department of Agriculture and Food to prepare contracts with the Orange County Vector Control District, which was selected as the subcontractor, LeFeuvre said.
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