Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOrange International Street Fair
IN THE NEWS

Orange International Street Fair

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992 | HELAINE OLEN
The Orange International Street Fair begins Friday and continues through Sunday with a Labor Day weekend schedule of entertainment, food and fun. The fair's theme is "Orange: It's a Small World," said Al Ricci, president of the Orange International Street Fair. "Orange is a melting pot of all different cultures, and is a small world in and of itself," Ricci said. The fair will feature "ethnic streets" where visitors can buy ethnic foods and learn a bit about a variety of cultures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2005 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
The fare at the annual Orange International Street Fair can be unpredictable, but it can always be counted on to showcase the city's diversity. In addition to the German oompah band, for instance, the Labor Day weekend food and beer extravaganza featured aging surf band members, wearing Hawaiian shirts and Mexican sombreros, playing rock 'n' roll tunes from the 1960s at Polynesian Corner.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1988
In his original draft of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson wrote, "We hold these truths to be sacred and undeniable; that all men are created equal and independent, that from that equal creation they derive rights inherent and inalienable, among which are the preservation of life and liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." Amnesty International, winner of the 1977 Nobel Peace Prize, believes that these principles apply to all people regardless of the country in which they live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
Even as the temperature soared past 100 before 11 a.m., vendors and customers kept cooking and eating at the Orange International Street Fair. Nearly 500,000 people attended the annual three-day event that ended Sunday, police estimated. "It's shoulder-to-shoulder people here, and they are all eating," said Sgt. Jeff Burton. "I wish I could tell you that the heat could stop me, but it can't," said Michelle Munoz, a 32-year-old mother of two who had enjoyed kielbasa and a steak sandwich.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the first street fair in Orange, you drank lemonade to quench your thirst. It was 1910, and by local ordinance, Orange was dry. No liquor stores. No bars. Only a few bootleggers and a winery just beyond the city limits. What a difference 89 years make. Those attending this year's Orange International Street Fair will find beer in profusion--14 brands from nine countries.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 500,000 people expected to visit the Orange International Street Fair this weekend would have no trouble recognizing the city it was first held in even if they attended 89 years ago. Revived in 1973 for the city's centennial and repeated each year since, the modern street fair was meant to be a reenactment of the original, one-time event of 1910.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emma Armen didn't know what she was starting when in 1962 she opened Emma's Antiques in downtown, now Old Towne, Orange. Hers was the first antique store there. Nowadays the downtown merchants' association lists 38 antique shops and malls in the four-block downtown area, and that isn't all of them. There is such a concentration of antiques that for the last three years owners have promoted their shops as a tourist destination, trying to draw visitors attracted to Orange County by Disneyland.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had it not been for the Post Office Department, this year's street fair would be held in a city named Richland. That was the name of the farming community promoters laid out in 1871 a little north of Santa Ana. But in 1873 when a post office was to be built, the Post Office Department refused to use the name; there was already a Richland in Sacramento County. Instead, the town was named Orange. It made sense. The orange, which would become the town's heart and soul, was on the rise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1985 | Jeanne Boyer \f7
The beer and wine almost didn't flow this year at the 13th annual Orange International Street Fair. It wasn't until Thursday--the day before the Labor Day weekend festival was scheduled to begin--that fair organizers were able to obtain liquor liability insurance for the event. Bob Paul, president of the volunteer Orange International Street Fair Inc. that organizes the event, said he had been "diligently trying since March" to find insurance, which ultimately was written by a Florida firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2001 | Mai Tran
Featuring food, entertainment, and arts and crafts from 15 cultures, the 29th annual Orange International Street Fair opens today. Officials expect a total of 500,000 people to attend the three-day event, which could make parking spots scarce. "This is a kind of event where there's no centralized parking," said Marshall Feduk, the fair's publicity chairman. "It's like parking at a mall at Christmas."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year, Orange County artist Marshall Feduk attempted to get a documentary made about the annual Orange International Street Fair. He couldn't raise the money in time, however--and that turned out to be just fine with local law enforcement officials. They worried that a film extolling the virtues of the city's already teeming event might increase attendance to unmanageable levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Orange's annual International Street Fair is expected to draw 800,000 people before it ends at 10 p.m. today, more than the 600,000 the event drew last year, organizers said. "It is kind of funny watching people trying to find [parking] spots," said Jake Goetz, who lives nearby, sipping from a can of beer before adding it to the small pile of empties between his cooler and his lawn chair. "I've seen the same car go back and forth tons of times. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The distant sounds of a merry crowd--music and laughter and shouts--rolled down Orange Street on Saturday afternoon where they ran smack into old Jimi Hendrix songs pouring out of a portable stereo on Jake Goetz's front lawn. The crowd noise came from the city of Orange's annual International Street Fair, which organizers say could draw 800,000 people before it ends at 10 p.m. today, well ahead of the 600,000 people it drew last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven-year-old Ian Cuthbertson enjoyed the Orange International Street Fair on Saturday in style. Stretched out in a large wood-sided toy wagon, he had it all: a fluffy pillow, a big bag of popcorn, T-shirts, souvenir key chains, stickers and cup holders from a local radio station. He had sampled the food, played with goats in the petting zoo, and now he was kicking back. While his little brother Kasen, 4, sat on their father's shoulders, Ian enjoyed having the wagon to himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 500,000 people expected to visit the Orange International Street Fair this weekend would have no trouble recognizing the city in which it was first held 89 years ago. Revived in 1973 for the city's centennial and repeated each year since, the modern street fair--which this year features 145 booths selling crafts, food and drink from 15 cultures and nationalities plus 10 stages featuring free performances--was meant to be a reenactment of the original, one-time event of 1910.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emma Armen didn't know what she was starting when in 1962 she opened Emma's Antiques in downtown, now Old Towne, Orange. Hers was the first antique store there. Nowadays the downtown merchants' association lists 38 antique shops and malls in the four-block downtown area, and that isn't all of them. There is such a concentration of antiques that for the last three years owners have promoted their shops as a tourist destination, trying to draw visitors attracted to Orange County by Disneyland.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had it not been for the Post Office Department, this year's street fair would be held in a city named Richland. That was the name of the farming community promoters laid out in 1871 a little north of Santa Ana. But in 1873 when a post office was to be built, the Post Office Department refused to use the name; there was already a Richland in Sacramento County. Instead, the town was named Orange. It made sense. The orange, which would become the town's heart and soul, was on the rise.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|