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Orange Unified School Board

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG
Trustee Barry Resnick was unanimously elected president of the Orange Unified School Board last week during the district's annual organizational meeting. Resnick, 41, was elected to the board in 1989 and was elected vice president in December, 1990. He chairs the travel and tourism department at Rancho Santiago College, where he has served on the faculty since 1980. Outgoing president Alan E. Irish will remain on the board.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000 | BILL LEWIS, Bill Lewis is on the Orange Unified Board of Education
As a conservative Republican who supports school vouchers and opposes property tax increases, I have become embarrassed to be a member of the Orange Unified Board of Education. Since first elected in 1991, I have always supported fiscal solvency, a stronger student curriculum and more opportunities for those who will never attend college.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Despite pleas from parents and bus drivers, the Orange Unified School Board voted Thursday, after weeks of debate, to privatize its student bus system and awarded a contract to Santa Barbara Transportation Corp. Wording in the school board's resolution states that the district will continue to negotiate with the California School Employees Assn., the union representing bus drivers, on "awarding and effects" of the contract. Union leaders said they will continue to fight the decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1996
Your Sept. 10 editorial, "Privatization Is No Panacea," really hits the mark. The Orange Unified School District would have you believe that it went to a private firm because its school bus fleet is old and costly to run, but how can paying a private company to drive Orange's old bus fleet resolve the problem of aged buses? The buses are just as old no matter who drives them. What Orange Unified did lose was control of the situation. Had they been handling their own bus transportation system, they would have had plenty of time to remedy any "glitches" rather than be handed the problem at the very last minute by a private company that bailed out. OUSD employees are dedicated workers who care about their students and despite shabby treatment by the OUSD and the Santa Barbara Transportation Co. rallied to OUSD's cry for help and came back to get our students to school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Less bilingual education, more early reading, leaner legal bills and promoting voluntary community service were some of the goals set by newly seated members of the Orange Unified School Board at a workshop this week. This is the second consecutive year the board has set district goals before tackling budget decisions in the spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The school board, which voted earlier this month to find a private contractor to run its student transport system, has hit a roadblock. Purchasing Director Dwain Raney pointed out to trustees of the Orange Unified School Board, after they voted to privatize the bus system, that the bid requests they had sent to potential contractors failed to ask such essential questions as how much field trips would cost. "I'd hate to see Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996
Re "Orange Trustees Reject Federal Aid as Tainted," May 25: Once again the Orange Unified school board majority has chosen to cut off their nose to spite their face. To deny students the opportunity to connect with local businesses and other agencies in an effort to improve their career education is just another example of the short-sighted political agenda that those trustees are pushing down our throats. This federal government paranoia wherein Trustee Bill Lewis compares the government to a drug dealer is ludicrous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG
Bill Lewis had the publicity photos, the campaign flyer, the political consultant and the endorsements. But he won't need any of them for this year's Orange Unified School Board race. After just three years as an Orange resident, Lewis, 38, won his trustee seat by default because no one filed to run against him. The victory is an unusual trophy for a newcomer to local politics, election officials say. Lewis will replace Trustee Nancy L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1996
Your Sept. 10 editorial, "Privatization Is No Panacea," really hits the mark. The Orange Unified School District would have you believe that it went to a private firm because its school bus fleet is old and costly to run, but how can paying a private company to drive Orange's old bus fleet resolve the problem of aged buses? The buses are just as old no matter who drives them. What Orange Unified did lose was control of the situation. Had they been handling their own bus transportation system, they would have had plenty of time to remedy any "glitches" rather than be handed the problem at the very last minute by a private company that bailed out. OUSD employees are dedicated workers who care about their students and despite shabby treatment by the OUSD and the Santa Barbara Transportation Co. rallied to OUSD's cry for help and came back to get our students to school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lingering effects of a years-old kickback scandal and divisive labor disputes have made the Orange Unified School District board race the most crowded and controversial of the eight school contests on the Nov. 7 ballot. Plagued by the scandal and a seven-day teachers' strike last spring, the first in the county in three years, the district also has had more recent problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996
Re "Orange Trustees Reject Federal Aid as Tainted," May 25: Once again the Orange Unified school board majority has chosen to cut off their nose to spite their face. To deny students the opportunity to connect with local businesses and other agencies in an effort to improve their career education is just another example of the short-sighted political agenda that those trustees are pushing down our throats. This federal government paranoia wherein Trustee Bill Lewis compares the government to a drug dealer is ludicrous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Despite pleas from parents and bus drivers, the Orange Unified School Board voted Thursday, after weeks of debate, to privatize its student bus system and awarded a contract to Santa Barbara Transportation Corp. Wording in the school board's resolution states that the district will continue to negotiate with the California School Employees Assn., the union representing bus drivers, on "awarding and effects" of the contract. Union leaders said they will continue to fight the decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The school board, which voted earlier this month to find a private contractor to run its student transport system, has hit a roadblock. Purchasing Director Dwain Raney pointed out to trustees of the Orange Unified School Board, after they voted to privatize the bus system, that the bid requests they had sent to potential contractors failed to ask such essential questions as how much field trips would cost. "I'd hate to see Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Less bilingual education, more early reading, leaner legal bills and promoting voluntary community service were some of the goals set by newly seated members of the Orange Unified School Board at a workshop this week. This is the second consecutive year the board has set district goals before tackling budget decisions in the spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The controversial use of a dog to search school buses for drugs will continue, Orange Unified School District trustees voted Thursday night. Although several parents expressed opposition to the program, trustees were united in support of the policy, which began in October. The parents were among a capacity audience for the meeting at district headquarters. "As a parent of two elementary-aged children, will I ever be comfortable allowing my children to use district buses?"
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty degrees hot. Sixty percent humid. Go to a beach, find an air-conditioned movie theater, do anything but stand out here in front of the school district headquarters waving signs, chanting and wilting. But no, that would be the easy thing to do. The Orange Unified School District board members, who over the years have rivaled Frank Sinatra in the ability to do things their way, are again under siege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1988 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Teachers in the Orange Unified School District staged a one-day boycott of their classrooms and picketed for better pay and fringe benefits Tuesday--the first teacher strike in Orange County in three years. Hundreds of the 1,100 teachers in the sprawling, central Orange County school district marched and chanted in front of their schools. There were no serious incidents or confrontations, but student absenteeism districtwide was 10 times greater than usual.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty degrees hot. Sixty percent humid. Go to a beach, find an air-conditioned movie theater, do anything but stand out here in front of the school district headquarters waving signs, chanting and wilting. But no, that would be the easy thing to do. The Orange Unified School District board members, who over the years have rivaled Frank Sinatra in the ability to do things their way, are again under siege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG
Trustee Barry Resnick was unanimously elected president of the Orange Unified School Board last week during the district's annual organizational meeting. Resnick, 41, was elected to the board in 1989 and was elected vice president in December, 1990. He chairs the travel and tourism department at Rancho Santiago College, where he has served on the faculty since 1980. Outgoing president Alan E. Irish will remain on the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG
Bill Lewis had the publicity photos, the campaign flyer, the political consultant and the endorsements. But he won't need any of them for this year's Orange Unified School Board race. After just three years as an Orange resident, Lewis, 38, won his trustee seat by default because no one filed to run against him. The victory is an unusual trophy for a newcomer to local politics, election officials say. Lewis will replace Trustee Nancy L.
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