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Orangutans

ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rose-Marie Weisz grew up on a cattle ranch in North Dakota; now her job is managing very different animals: orangutans. The four orangutans at the Los Angeles Zoo--Eloise, Bruno, Rosie and Kalim--recently moved into a new $6.5-million habitat, called the Red Ape Rain Forest. The new exhibit replicates the creatures' natural habitat in Borneo and Sumatra with 20-foot bamboo, fruit trees, and a recirculating stream that runs through the 6,000-square-foot area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999
The Los Angeles Zoo unveiled plans Monday for a $5-million project that is expected to provide a healthier environment for its four orangutans than their current, cramped quarters. At a news conference at the Griffith Park facility, zoo officials introduced models of the Red Ape Rain Forest, 6,000 square feet of open space with a recirculating stream and 20-foot artificial trees that the apes can use for climbing and swinging.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first open-heart surgery performed on an ape, a medical team led by an internationally known heart surgeon worked for seven hours Saturday to repair a life-threatening hole in the heart of a young orangutan at the San Diego Zoo.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
An orangutan smuggler was sentenced Friday to 13 months in prison in a KGB-linked case that aroused the indignation of conservationists around the world. In a last-minute twist, prosecutors refused to recommend a lighter sentence for Matthew Block, 31, questioning whether he had fully cooperated with the government as required by his plea bargain.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sacrificed to a worldwide demand for mahogany to fashion into desks and dining tables, lost to a need for land to feed a growing population, the rain forests of Borneo and Sumatra are fast dwindling. And as these big trees fall, so too goes the only habitat of the orangutan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992
An 11-year-old Bornean orangutan died at the Los Angeles Zoo following a medical procedure conducted to identify a lung illness, zoo officials said Friday. Two zoo veterinarians conducted a procedure to gather specimens from a lesion on the orangutan's lung during an operation Thursday in the zoo's health center. They were assisted by a veterinary surgeon, a pediatric pulmonary specialist and a cardiovascular technologist from Huntington Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A 70-pound orangutan escaped from her enclosure at the San Diego Zoo on Friday and romped free for half an hour before being netted and tranquilized by keepers. Indah, a 7-year-old Sumatran orangutan, an endangered species, emptied trash cans and ate scraps as zoo visitors watched from a distance. The orangutan, a member of the ape family, was able to escape because the moat in the orangutan exhibit was dry for the protection of a new member of the group, 1-year-old Karen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987 | JERRY BELCHER, Times Staff Writer
Not to plague you with yet another worry, but there's been a population explosion among orangutans in the zoos of America. Because of the orangutan glut, a special committee of the American Assn. of Zoological Parks and Aquariums last month declared a moratorium on the breeding of the "orangs," as zoo folks affectionately call the sleepy-eyed, long-armed members of the ape family.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sacrificed to a worldwide demand for mahogany to fashion into desks and dining tables, lost to a need for land to feed a growing population, the rain forests of Borneo and Sumatra are dwindling fast. And as the trees fall, so too goes the only habitat of the orangutan.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | GEORGE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last thing Birute Galdikas wanted or needed was to get involved in rescuing orangutans from the intrigue of international smuggling rings. At her Borneo jungle camp, the UCLA-trained scientist had her hands full with the research that has made her the world's foremost authority on orangutans in the wild. In British Columbia while away from camp, she had students to teach at Simon Fraser University. But then the call came. In Bangkok Feb.
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