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Orangutans

NEWS
March 5, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sacrificed to a worldwide demand for mahogany to fashion into desks and dining tables, lost to a need for land to feed a growing population, the rain forests of Borneo and Sumatra are fast dwindling. And as these big trees fall, so too goes the only habitat of the orangutan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992
An 11-year-old Bornean orangutan died at the Los Angeles Zoo following a medical procedure conducted to identify a lung illness, zoo officials said Friday. Two zoo veterinarians conducted a procedure to gather specimens from a lesion on the orangutan's lung during an operation Thursday in the zoo's health center. They were assisted by a veterinary surgeon, a pediatric pulmonary specialist and a cardiovascular technologist from Huntington Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A 70-pound orangutan escaped from her enclosure at the San Diego Zoo on Friday and romped free for half an hour before being netted and tranquilized by keepers. Indah, a 7-year-old Sumatran orangutan, an endangered species, emptied trash cans and ate scraps as zoo visitors watched from a distance. The orangutan, a member of the ape family, was able to escape because the moat in the orangutan exhibit was dry for the protection of a new member of the group, 1-year-old Karen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987 | JERRY BELCHER, Times Staff Writer
Not to plague you with yet another worry, but there's been a population explosion among orangutans in the zoos of America. Because of the orangutan glut, a special committee of the American Assn. of Zoological Parks and Aquariums last month declared a moratorium on the breeding of the "orangs," as zoo folks affectionately call the sleepy-eyed, long-armed members of the ape family.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sacrificed to a worldwide demand for mahogany to fashion into desks and dining tables, lost to a need for land to feed a growing population, the rain forests of Borneo and Sumatra are dwindling fast. And as the trees fall, so too goes the only habitat of the orangutan.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | GEORGE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last thing Birute Galdikas wanted or needed was to get involved in rescuing orangutans from the intrigue of international smuggling rings. At her Borneo jungle camp, the UCLA-trained scientist had her hands full with the research that has made her the world's foremost authority on orangutans in the wild. In British Columbia while away from camp, she had students to teach at Simon Fraser University. But then the call came. In Bangkok Feb.
TRAVEL
January 19, 1997 | LESLIE NEVISON, Nevison is a Livermore, Calif., freelance writer
The guide brought a finger to his lips in the universal sign for silence and pointed with his other hand to the sky. "Longbeak," he whispered. I was too late to see the hornbill but I could hear the swoosh of great wings as it lifted from a treetop 30 feet above: perhaps to return to the spirit world that the people of Borneo believe is its home. The hornbill was probably frightened by my noisy approach.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With performing orangutans, chorus line dancers and a few laughs, this show has the makings of a hit on the Las Vegas Strip. Or maybe a TV soap opera, given the accusations of abuse, tearful denials and tales of intrigue. But the stage for this show is the Clark County courthouse, a few miles off the famed Strip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
About 30 years ago, noted anthropologist Louis Leakey sent the first of three women to Africa and Asia to study primates in the wild. By learning how the primates lived and interacted, he hoped to find important clues to the lives of the first humans that would flesh out the skeletal picture provided by his own excavation of fossils in the Olduvai Gorge of Tanzania. In 1960, he sent Jane Goodall, then a naive 26-year-old with no college degree, to Tanzania.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Entertainer Bobby Berosini was awarded $4.2 million by a jury Saturday in his bitter yearlong battle with animal rights activists who accused him of beating orangutans used in his act on the Las Vegas Strip. "Thank you, America," Berosini, a native of Czechoslovakia, said as he left the courtroom. "He'll never see a penny of that money," responded Philip Hirschkop, an attorney for the Washington-based People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).
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