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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Vivian Barnes, being mentally ill and homeless was like being stuck on a cruel roller-coaster ride--it was dizzying, terrifying and disorienting, and there was no way to make it stop. But Barnes, a diminutive woman with a ready smile, found a way off last year. Diagnosed as manic-depressive, she was one of nine people who entered Orbison House in Hollywood, touted as the county's first public-private effort to create permanent housing for the homeless mentally ill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Vivian Barnes, being mentally ill and homeless was like being stuck on a cruel roller-coaster ride--it was dizzying, terrifying and disorienting, and there was no way to make it stop. But Barnes, a diminutive woman with a ready smile, found a way off last year. Diagnosed as manic-depressive, she was one of nine people who entered Orbison House in Hollywood, touted as the county's first public-private effort to create permanent housing for the homeless mentally ill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2011 | Randy Lewis
When singer Roy Orbison was touring England in 1968, it had been four years since he last appeared at the top of the charts with "Oh, Pretty Woman," even though he continued playing live and recording long after the pulse of rock music shifted away from his signature brand of sweepingly operatic pop. At a show in Leeds on that tour, he met 18-year-old German fan Barbara Ann Marie Wellhoener Jakobs, and within a year the two were married....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993
At least 25,000 homeless mentally ill people live on the streets of Los Angeles County. A small but comprehensive program, A Community of Friends, is making a dent by applying all kinds of housing expertise, from design to financing to community relations.
REAL ESTATE
July 26, 1992 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Foster is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
"How I'd like to settle down and have a home. One is attached to a house one has arranged oneself, and feels at home in it. I cannot tell you how much pleasure it gives me ..." -- Vincent van Gogh, before entering an Aries insane asylum Boxed away in institutions, board and care homes and "custodial congregate living" arrangements, society's most neglected group--the homeless mentally ill--are now being given the chance to establish affordable, permanent homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Working without accolades, a special housing corporation has been able to put a dent in the number of mentally ill people on the streets of Southern California. A Community of Friends, a nonprofit organization, has blended creative real estate and financial wrangling with help from the county's social service agencies to build low-income apartments for more than 300 men and women trying to rebuild lives after depression, addictions or other mental illnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992 | JOCELYN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long bout with severe depression and suicidal urges, it seemed that Dennis Bullock had finally lost the war. Mental illness had caused the Vietnam veteran to lose his home, his job and, most of all, his hope. Bullock became a spectator in the world, watching from behind the walls of mental institutions as others lived the life of normalcy he longed to have. "I was unable to work or function properly," Bullock said, recalling those years.
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