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FOOD
September 2, 2010
  Chicken thighs with honey, olives and oregano Total time: About 2 hours, plus marinating time Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from "The Essential Book of Jewish Festival Cooking" by Phyllis Glazer and Miriyam Glazer. Even though some sources say that the honey of the Bible was made of dates, grapes, figs or carobs, dishes sweetened by honey are a frequent feature of Rosh Hashana fare. This dish may be prepared several hours in advance and reheated in the oven.
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FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: We recently dined at Ciopinot in San Luis Obispo. We tried their "no work" cioppino, and it was the best cioppino we've ever eaten. Wonder if they will share the recipe? Thank you. Brian Somodi Laguna Beach Dear Brian: It may take a little work prepping the ingredients, but Ciopinot's take on this classic contains a lot of flavor in just a few simple steps, and it makes a perfect dinner for those cold winter nights! Enjoy! Ciopinot's 'no work' cioppino Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from Ciopinot in San Luis Obispo.
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FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: We recently dined at Ciopinot in San Luis Obispo. We tried their "no work" cioppino, and it was the best cioppino we've ever eaten. Wonder if they will share the recipe? Thank you. Brian Somodi Laguna Beach Dear Brian: It may take a little work prepping the ingredients, but Ciopinot's take on this classic contains a lot of flavor in just a few simple steps, and it makes a perfect dinner for those cold winter nights! Enjoy! Ciopinot's 'no work' cioppino Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from Ciopinot in San Luis Obispo.
FOOD
August 25, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: Old Venice in Manhattan Beach makes excellent Greek and Italian food, but its lemon chicken, from the Greek side of the menu, is especially wonderful. I can still taste the delicious sauce. Any chance of getting the recipe? I'd love to make it for my foreign dinner group. Phyllis Ruderman Manhattan Beach Dear Phyllis: Old Venice was happy to share its recipe with us, which we've adapted below. Enjoy! Old Venice's Greek lemon chicken Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Adapted from Old Venice in Manhattan Beach 1 (3½- to 4½-pound)
FOOD
August 25, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: Old Venice in Manhattan Beach makes excellent Greek and Italian food, but its lemon chicken, from the Greek side of the menu, is especially wonderful. I can still taste the delicious sauce. Any chance of getting the recipe? I'd love to make it for my foreign dinner group. Phyllis Ruderman Manhattan Beach Dear Phyllis: Old Venice was happy to share its recipe with us, which we've adapted below. Enjoy! Old Venice's Greek lemon chicken Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Adapted from Old Venice in Manhattan Beach 1 (3½- to 4½-pound)
FOOD
March 12, 1987
Although stir-frying originated in the Far East, recipes cooked by this method needn't be limited to those from that part of the world. Mexican Beef Stir-Fry cooks thin slices of lean flank steak in oil seasoned with cumin, garlic salt and oregano. Add sweet red pepper and onions and serve over lettuce rafts, or use for tacos and tostadas. Favorite toppings such as shredded cheese, chopped tomato, guacamole and salsa will add the finishing touches.
FOOD
August 27, 1997 | DONNA DEANE, Deane is director of The Times Test Kitchen
One of the ways we cut the fat in this Mexican tostada was by making our own refried beans. Traditionally beans are fried in lard or bacon fat for flavor. Instead, we sauteed the garlic and onion in a skillet sprayed with nonfat cooking spray and added cumin and oregano to boost the flavor and help compensate for the lack of fat. The Mexican panela cheese that is sprinkled over the almost-finished tostadas is available in most supermarkets.
FOOD
August 25, 1994
Just a short note to thank you for your sensible and well-balanced approach to the issues you cover in your columns. You have given me much confidence as I got about my business in the kitchen. Certainly the balsamic vinegar you suggest in today's column (In the Kitchen, Aug. 4) is a good idea (I've been using it for the last year) but the simplest version of a broiled tomato (which is not exactly stuffed) using olive oil, balsamic vinegar, pepper, kosher salt, Greek oregano and Parmesan, produces a result that goes far in my house, where some won't eat anchovies.
FOOD
August 1, 2007
Talk to any southern Italian cook and you'll hear a recipe for salmoriglio . And the odds are they'll all be different. Some add water to the sauce; others go with straight lemon juice. Some cook the sauce gently; others insist it be served without cooking. And so it goes. I find that both of these steps slightly soften the attack of the oregano, which in my book is a good thing (fresh oregano is about as subtle as raw garlic). The heating also thickens the emulsion a little. The recipe here is based on one found in "Il Libro d'Oro della Cucina e dei Vini di Sicilia," by Pino Correnti.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000 | MARTIN BOOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Utopia" has an ominous sound as a restaurant name. Ideological purity is bad enough in politics; in food, it could mean trouble. Will you get a menu or a manifesto? Relax. This intimate cafe-style eatery, situated in a gentrifying Long Beach neighborhood, is anything but dogmatic. The menu skips merrily--and most of the time quite gracefully--across Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Asian and New World specialties. It's eclectic, not dogmatic.
FOOD
September 2, 2010
  Chicken thighs with honey, olives and oregano Total time: About 2 hours, plus marinating time Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from "The Essential Book of Jewish Festival Cooking" by Phyllis Glazer and Miriyam Glazer. Even though some sources say that the honey of the Bible was made of dates, grapes, figs or carobs, dishes sweetened by honey are a frequent feature of Rosh Hashana fare. This dish may be prepared several hours in advance and reheated in the oven.
FOOD
March 11, 2009 | Emily Green
As outdoor herb gardens perk up with spring, resist the temptation to rush out to harvest the new leaves. Let your garden grow. Instead, take a moment to revisit cooking with dried herbs. Contrary to conventional wisdom, fresh isn't always better. As proof, witness the heaping pile of salami, provolone, lettuce, radicchio, onion, pepperoncini and garbanzo beans known as Nancy's Chopped Salad at Pizzeria Mozza.
FOOD
August 1, 2007
Talk to any southern Italian cook and you'll hear a recipe for salmoriglio . And the odds are they'll all be different. Some add water to the sauce; others go with straight lemon juice. Some cook the sauce gently; others insist it be served without cooking. And so it goes. I find that both of these steps slightly soften the attack of the oregano, which in my book is a good thing (fresh oregano is about as subtle as raw garlic). The heating also thickens the emulsion a little. The recipe here is based on one found in "Il Libro d'Oro della Cucina e dei Vini di Sicilia," by Pino Correnti.
HEALTH
October 24, 2005 | Elena Conis
Pungent and peppery, oregano is a popular ingredient in Italian and Greek cooking, where it spices up beef, pasta sauces and other dishes. The herb also has a long history of medicinal use. Ancient Greeks prescribed it for aching muscles and failing hearts. The Chinese took it for fevers and vomiting. In the 1800s, some American physicians recommended it to women with irregular menstrual cycles, and in parts of South America it has been used to induce labor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000 | MARTIN BOOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Utopia" has an ominous sound as a restaurant name. Ideological purity is bad enough in politics; in food, it could mean trouble. Will you get a menu or a manifesto? Relax. This intimate cafe-style eatery, situated in a gentrifying Long Beach neighborhood, is anything but dogmatic. The menu skips merrily--and most of the time quite gracefully--across Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Asian and New World specialties. It's eclectic, not dogmatic.
FOOD
August 27, 1997 | DONNA DEANE, Deane is director of The Times Test Kitchen
One of the ways we cut the fat in this Mexican tostada was by making our own refried beans. Traditionally beans are fried in lard or bacon fat for flavor. Instead, we sauteed the garlic and onion in a skillet sprayed with nonfat cooking spray and added cumin and oregano to boost the flavor and help compensate for the lack of fat. The Mexican panela cheese that is sprinkled over the almost-finished tostadas is available in most supermarkets.
HEALTH
October 24, 2005 | Elena Conis
Pungent and peppery, oregano is a popular ingredient in Italian and Greek cooking, where it spices up beef, pasta sauces and other dishes. The herb also has a long history of medicinal use. Ancient Greeks prescribed it for aching muscles and failing hearts. The Chinese took it for fevers and vomiting. In the 1800s, some American physicians recommended it to women with irregular menstrual cycles, and in parts of South America it has been used to induce labor.
FOOD
August 3, 1995 | SYLVIA THOMPSON
I regard oreganos as the Harleys of the herb world. Vroom vroom! In fact, Greek oregano is so lusty, on hot summer nights you can almost hear bouzouki music thrumming from the patch. I hear you say, "What's this Greek oregano? What's Greek about it? Isn't oregano just oregano?" No way. There are at least nine different species of the genus Origanum. You get the feeling that when botanical names were handed out the naming committee had drunk its share of ouzo.
FOOD
August 3, 1995 | SYLVIA THOMPSON
I regard oreganos as the Harleys of the herb world. Vroom vroom! In fact, Greek oregano is so lusty, on hot summer nights you can almost hear bouzouki music thrumming from the patch. I hear you say, "What's this Greek oregano? What's Greek about it? Isn't oregano just oregano?" No way. There are at least nine different species of the genus Origanum. You get the feeling that when botanical names were handed out the naming committee had drunk its share of ouzo.
HOME & GARDEN
July 22, 1995 | From Associated Press
The "pizza herb"--oregano--comes in a variety of flavors, from very mild to downright peppery. Oregano is native to the Mediterranean and was originally employed as a medicinal herb for relieving sores, insect bites and muscle aches. Today, oregano is a seasoning especially popular in Italy, Mexico, South America, Cuba, Greece, Turkey, Portugal and Spain. Part of the mint family, oregano encompasses about 20 subspecies of perennial plants.
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