Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOregon And Michigan
IN THE NEWS

Oregon And Michigan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft serial murder trial deliberated for a second day Saturday in Santa Ana without reaching a verdict and returned to the hotel where they have been ordered sequestered by Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin. Kraft, 44, a Long Beach computer consultant, is charged with murdering 16 young men in Orange County between 1972 and 1983. The case went to the jury of 10 women and 2 men on Friday after seven months of testimony. McCartin ordered the jury sequestered--a rare step in modern criminal cases--over the objections of Kraft's attorneys, who feared that jurors subconsciously would feel pressure to rush a verdict so they could return home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
October 5, 2002 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling Friday a "defining day" in the fight against terrorism, Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft announced the arrests of four people on charges of conspiring to wage war against U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan, as so-called American Talib John Walker Lindh was sentenced and shoe-bomber Richard Reid pleaded guilty to trying to blow up a transatlantic airliner. FBI agents arrested two men and one woman in a series of predawn raids in Portland, Ore., and another man near Detroit.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
A defense lawyer argued Wednesday that the jury automatically will assume Randy Steven Kraft is guilty of eight more murders if prosecutors are allowed to introduce any new entries from his handwritten list. "The prosecution won't need to present any other evidence," William J. Kopeny said. "The jurors already believe that it is a death list." The prosecution, which calls the list Kraft's "score card" of his victims, was permitted to introduce 13 of its coded entries when Kraft was convicted two weeks ago of 16 Orange County murders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors ended their case in the penalty phase of the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial Tuesday, and defense lawyers quickly left to huddle over the question that has haunted them for five years. Is there anything they possibly can do to save Kraft from the death sentence? "I've thought of nothing else," Kraft attorney C. Thomas McDonald said outside court recently. "What do you say to jurors who are already convinced your client is a serial killer?" Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin sent the jurors home until July 17, when the defense will begin its side.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Randy Steven Kraft, a soft-spoken computer consultant depicted by prosecutors as perhaps the worst serial killer in U.S. history, was convicted today of murdering 16 young men in Orange County, most of them sexually mutilated and dumped along freeways over more than a decade. Kraft, 44, appeared stunned when the clerk in Santa Ana Superior Court read the first "guilty" verdict, for the earliest murder. Families of victims broke into tears as they heard verdicts involving their loved ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Two mothers from Michigan who testified during the penalty phase of Randy Steven Kraft's murder trial Monday contributed more than just emotional testimony about their sons' deaths. They linked their sons' possessions to the computer consultant. One identified her son's car keys, found in Kraft's hotel room. The other identified her son's jacket, belt and boots, found at Kraft's Long Beach home. The bodies of their sons, Christopher Alan Schoenborn, 20, and Dennis Patrick Alt, 24, were found dumped along a rural roadside a few miles north of Grand Rapids, Mich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors ended their case in the penalty phase of the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial Tuesday, and defense lawyers quickly left to huddle over the question that has haunted them for five years. Is there anything they possibly can do to save Kraft from the death sentence? "I've thought of nothing else," Kraft attorney C. Thomas McDonald said outside court recently. "What do you say to jurors who are already convinced your client is a serial killer?" Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin sent the jurors home until July 17, when the defense will begin its side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft serial murder trial broke at noon Saturday, completing their second day of deliberations, and returned to the hotel where they have been ordered sequestered by Judge Donald A. McCartin. Kraft, now 44, a Long Beach computer consultant, is on trial in Santa Ana charged with 16 murders of young men in Orange County between 1972 and 1983. The jurors, 10 women and 2 men, not only have hundreds of exhibits to pore over, they have a multitude of verdict forms to complete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft serial murder trial in Santa Ana headed back to their hotel for the weekend Friday afternoon after completing their 7th day of deliberations. They will resume deliberations Monday. Kraft attorney C. Thomas McDonald said that based on the few questions that the jurors have asked, "I think they have a long way to go. But it doesn't surprise me that they are taking this much time." Kraft, now 44, a Long Beach computer consultant, is charged with 16 murders of young men in Orange County.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Randy Steven Kraft, a soft-spoken computer consultant depicted by prosecutors as perhaps the worst serial killer in U.S. history, was convicted today of murdering 16 young men in Orange County, most of them sexually mutilated and dumped along freeways over more than a decade. Kraft, 44, appeared stunned when the clerk in Santa Ana Superior Court read the first "guilty" verdict about the earliest murder. Families of victims broke into tears as they heard verdicts involving their loved ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Two mothers from Michigan who testified during the penalty phase of Randy Steven Kraft's murder trial Monday contributed more than just emotional testimony about their sons' deaths. They linked their sons' possessions to the computer consultant. One identified her son's car keys, found in Kraft's hotel room. The other identified her son's jacket, belt and boots, found at Kraft's Long Beach home. The bodies of their sons, Christopher Alan Schoenborn, 20, and Dennis Patrick Alt, 24, were found dumped along a rural roadside a few miles north of Grand Rapids, Mich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
A defense lawyer argued Wednesday that the jury automatically will assume Randy Steven Kraft is guilty of eight more murders if prosecutors are allowed to introduce any new entries from his handwritten list. "The prosecution won't need to present any other evidence," William J. Kopeny said. "The jurors already believe that it is a death list." The prosecution, which calls the list Kraft's "score card" of his victims, was permitted to introduce 13 of its coded entries when Kraft was convicted two weeks ago of 16 Orange County murders.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Randy Steven Kraft, a soft-spoken computer consultant depicted by prosecutors as perhaps the worst serial killer in U.S. history, was convicted today of murdering 16 young men in Orange County, most of them sexually mutilated and dumped along freeways over more than a decade. Kraft, 44, appeared stunned when the clerk in Santa Ana Superior Court read the first "guilty" verdict, for the earliest murder. Families of victims broke into tears as they heard verdicts involving their loved ones.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Randy Steven Kraft, a soft-spoken computer consultant depicted by prosecutors as perhaps the worst serial killer in U.S. history, was convicted today of murdering 16 young men in Orange County, most of them sexually mutilated and dumped along freeways over more than a decade. Kraft, 44, appeared stunned when the clerk in Santa Ana Superior Court read the first "guilty" verdict about the earliest murder. Families of victims broke into tears as they heard verdicts involving their loved ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft serial murder trial in Santa Ana headed back to their hotel for the weekend Friday afternoon after completing their 7th day of deliberations. They will resume deliberations Monday. Kraft attorney C. Thomas McDonald said that based on the few questions that the jurors have asked, "I think they have a long way to go. But it doesn't surprise me that they are taking this much time." Kraft, now 44, a Long Beach computer consultant, is charged with 16 murders of young men in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft serial murder trial broke at noon Saturday, completing their second day of deliberations, and returned to the hotel where they have been ordered sequestered by Judge Donald A. McCartin. Kraft, now 44, a Long Beach computer consultant, is on trial in Santa Ana charged with 16 murders of young men in Orange County between 1972 and 1983. The jurors, 10 women and 2 men, not only have hundreds of exhibits to pore over, they have a multitude of verdict forms to complete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
With some high-technology visual aids, an attorney for Randy Steven Kraft argued to jurors Tuesday that there were too many discrepancies in the 16 slayings his client is charged with to think that one person committed them all. The case against Kraft, said defense attorney C. Thomas McDonald, "is a painting by a very clever prosecutor, to make these acts appear as if they were done by a single perpetrator." Kraft, 44, is on trial in Santa Ana, accused by prosecutors of killing more people than anyone else in California history.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2002 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling Friday a "defining day" in the fight against terrorism, Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft announced the arrests of four people on charges of conspiring to wage war against U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan, as so-called American Talib John Walker Lindh was sentenced and shoe-bomber Richard Reid pleaded guilty to trying to blow up a transatlantic airliner. FBI agents arrested two men and one woman in a series of predawn raids in Portland, Ore., and another man near Detroit.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Jurors in the Randy Steven Kraft serial murder trial deliberated for a second day Saturday in Santa Ana without reaching a verdict and returned to the hotel where they have been ordered sequestered by Superior Court Judge Donald A. McCartin. Kraft, 44, a Long Beach computer consultant, is charged with murdering 16 young men in Orange County between 1972 and 1983. The case went to the jury of 10 women and 2 men on Friday after seven months of testimony. McCartin ordered the jury sequestered--a rare step in modern criminal cases--over the objections of Kraft's attorneys, who feared that jurors subconsciously would feel pressure to rush a verdict so they could return home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
With some high-technology visual aids, an attorney for Randy Steven Kraft argued to jurors Tuesday that there were too many discrepancies in the 16 slayings his client is charged with to think that one person committed them all. The case against Kraft, said defense attorney C. Thomas McDonald, "is a painting by a very clever prosecutor, to make these acts appear as if they were done by a single perpetrator." Kraft, 44, is on trial in Santa Ana, accused by prosecutors of killing more people than anyone else in California history.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|